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I haven't seen you mention inspecting the chamber itself for old oil that maybe 'gummed up' inside . . . ?
 

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Discussion Starter #22
so I held the case and pushed it into the bolt face and the extractor pushed out of the way and snapped over the case rim. Which is how I would think omit would work when inserting a round into the chamber, what am I missing here??
 

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The extractor does NOT work if it doesn't pull the case from the chamber. No matter how it acts otherwise. If it doesn't work IN THE GUN, its useless and needs repair.
The Remington 'Three rings of steel' extractors are a very complicated part that's had engineering and production problems since the prototypes in 1946.
They ARE spring steel, but with very little 'temper'. They only have to work .021-.026" so can be very hard and brittle and still last a long time. It takes very few overly-hot loads to crack them. (most seem to be broken by trying to pry it out so it works better.)
There are at least four different variations of those extractors and all of them are tough to install correctly.

I really hope the newest Remington continues parts and repair. That's one that's commonly broke and seldom repaired as good as new.
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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If it works to put tape on a gauge to find "head space", couldn't you also put tape on the shoulder of the case, (obviously so it doesn't interfere with case to chamber fit) chamber said round and close the bolt then see if it extracts.

But first I'd clean the spiders out of the chamber, they can get quite a grip on brass, at least in Granny, my aged 788. She does the same thing when her chamber gets dirty. A couple passes with a bore mop that fits the chamber (say 45 caliber?) with some solvent then a couple dry patches and WALLAHH!

RJ
 
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If you have another 6mm Rem rifle that you've set up the dies to work, having the brass work in that rifle doesn't tell you much. Presumably the brass was fired in that rifle, and sized appropriately.

Make sure you are doing a true full-length resize, then try it in the "sticky" rifle. You may have a combination of incompletely-sized brass and a weak extractor both.
 

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Of course the extractor works with the bolt out of the gun, but it does NOT work with the case is centered in the bolt face as it is when in the chamber.
Your rifle doesn't extract. That means the extractor is not working.
Or the case is to short or chamber long and the extractor won't go over the rim.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Jbelk, I tried a small experiment by covering the head and rim of a resized case with black marker and after it dried I tried chambering it and when I opened the bolt the cartridge stayed in the chamber but fell free when I pointed the muzzle up, by the look of the rim the extractor didn’t go far enough to snap over the rim.

Recoil Junky, I’ve also thought about the tape on the shoulder, most likely my next trick, And yes the chamber is clean.

Amflyer, these cases were not fired from either of my other 6mm Remington’s, they are once fired cases I got at a small gunshow, and I full length sized them. And they worked fine in my 700 varmint rifle but not in this one.
 

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Take the FP out and check headspace with a factory cartridge. You should be able to feel one layer of tape (.003). The bolt shouldn't close on two layers of tape. If it closes on three layers, the rifle needs repair because it could be dangerous. Why complicate things by trying to wrap tape on a sharp taper? Base to datum is the measurement. "Datum" is used because it is a geometric way of determining a point on a taper.
POUR A CHAMBER CAST so you know what you're working with.

Note too-- to accurately determine headspace, remove the ejector.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Ok so I put tape on the shoulder and chambered the round..... it extracted and ejected every time.... so chamber is long extractor seems to work. So I have three choices 1) size cases just for this rifle, which could be problematic seeing I have two other rifles in this caliber, 2) have the barrel set back and re chambered, 3) have barrel replaced.
 

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HOW did the chamber get too deep? WHY has it got excess headspace? (It (probably) wasn't made that way by Remington). Before shooting it, that needs to be figured out.
Back to a chamber cast.
You didn't do anything but show with enough interference, the extractor works. You really don't KNOW what caliber that rifle is!
I'd take it to someone with the tools and knowledge to figure out what you have.
 
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Discussion Starter #32
Jbelk, so after three posts telling me I had a bad extractor that needed to be replaced, sometimes in capitals to prove your point, we finally agree that the extractor works and the chamber is deep. How did it get deep you ask? How does any chamber get deep?? Wear to the bolt lug area is a good place to start, maybe some hack with a reamer or worse maybe a drill or a slotted stick wrapped in Emory paper..... but none the less the chamber is long and I’m not even curious what it’s chambered in, this rifle will be getting re barreled. Thanks for your insight.
 

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So, all you have to do is change calibers for the extractor to work? ;)

My first suggestion would have been the first thing I did in my shop to figure out the problem. After that is just filling in bubbles in a flow charts depending on results of checks and test. Headspace check is #2, IF the chamber is good. If the chamber is 'bad' it opens up Set back or replace.

One thing to check. In the mid '80s, some M700 bolt heads were cut with too large a radius between the lugs and the body. That radius bore on the corner of the locking lug recesses instead of allowing the lugs to bear in the recesses. It created .010 excess headspace on the first very few shots. If your rifle is of that vintage, it's a possibility.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
I never said I would change calibers I only said if the chamber was long id replace the barrel. By the barrel code it’s 1977
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Doom, the bolt is electric pencil marked with the last four of the serial number which is how my other Remington’s are marked
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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You haven't proven much, since it's a pretty complicated formula to determine how much "thickness" the tape added at the shoulder. Got to dust off geometry for that one ;)

Put the tape on the BASE of the cartridge as Jack suggests. Gumming up the front of the chamber with bits of tape is just going to make this all the harder to figure out.

Figure out if the HEADSPACE is too long, first. That will tell you whether or not the extractor needs to be looked at. HEADSPACE will cause problems with the smoke going out the wrong end of the rifle; extractor problems will not. Check that FIRST!!!!!!
 

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Do yourself a favor, do some research on the proper way of checking headspace on Remington 700. To begin with, the proper way is to remove the ejector, extractor and firing pin from the bolt.
Make sure you have the correct gage for the type of ammunition the weapon fires and finally use at the very least a two gage set of headspace gages for you caliber of ammunition.
Don’t go playing games using tape. Shims or some other type of spacer. The difference between a go and no-go reading is .001 inches or 1/ten thousandth of an inch.
I check headspace on Model 700’s using a set of 10 gages for either the .308, 30-06, 5.56/.223 or 6.5mm Grendal. All the others, I use a 3 gage set of Go NoGo and Field.
It doesn’t matter what caliber headspace I’m checking, on bolt actions, I remove the extractor, ejector and firing pin, on semi automatic weapons I also remove the extractor, ejector and firing pin along with the spring or op rod or whatever is used to force the bolt into the closed firing position.
With something as critical as headspace, if you’re going to do it, DO IT CORRECTLY or get someone qualified to do it for you.
 

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The extractor does NOT work if it doesn't pull the case from the chamber. No matter how it acts otherwise. If it doesn't work IN THE GUN, its useless and needs repair.
The Remington 'Three rings of steel' extractors are a very complicated part that's had engineering and production problems since the prototypes in 1946.
They ARE spring steel, but with very little 'temper'. They only have to work .021-.026" so can be very hard and brittle and still last a long time. It takes very few overly-hot loads to crack them. (most seem to be broken by trying to pry it out so it works better.)
There are at least four different variations of those extractors and all of them are tough to install correctly.

I really hope the newest Remington continues parts and repair. That's one that's commonly broke and seldom repaired as good as new.
What JBelk said about the extractor being bad makes the most sense to me. I would start there before I ever worried about the headspace. It seems the most obvious remedy,. Take it to your Smith, I'm sure he has put in more than one Remmy extractor and has a Go guage.
 
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