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Discussion Starter #1
To keep the Walker style triggers working safely, they need periodic cleaning. Even a properly adjusted trigger can be dangerous when they get gummy because of the way the safety operates. The safety actually blocks the sear from dropping, it in no way blocks the trigger lever. If the trigger is pulled with the safety on, the trigger can hang especially if the tension screw has been backed out. Without the trigger in the proper position, the safety will release the sear and the rifle will fire. To do a good cleaning, the trigger unit needs to be removed in my opinion. You need a small hammer, a 3/32 punch, small quality screw driver, cleaning solvent and some light oil. The spray solvents work well for this, I like the non chlorinated Brakleen. A can of air is handy if you don't have a compressor. For oil, I use spray Rem oil because if coats everything with a thin layer and then I blow out the excess. Do not use gummy thick oils.
Remove the stock and pull the bolt out. Look at how the bolt release mechanism works as it is all pinned to the trigger. Switch the safety on so it is out of the way and drive out the rear pin from the right side. The sear will jump up and the bolt lock and spring will fall out. There is also a spring under the sear that is now free. Now drive out the front pin also from the right side, the trigger unit is now completely out. You can do a reasonably good job of washing the trigger without going any further. If you know the trigger has never been tampered with and you are happy with the settings just wash it out, blow it dry, spray it with oil and blow the excess oil out and reassemble. For old triggers and especially ones with the lacquer missing from the screws, might be a good idea to go a little deeper. A before picture showing the left side. Examine how the bolt lock works, the position of the lever and where the spring is located because when you drive out the rear pin from the other side, this stuff will swarm. The second pic shows what you should have.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Next, I like to remove the safety lever. Remove the clip on the right side. Lift off the pressure plate and the steel ball. The ball is held under tension by the plate which lets the safety snap between the on and off detents. I have washed globs of grease off safeties put on by guys trying to get a smoother quieter safety....don't do it, that crap works it's way into the trigger.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The trigger unit has 3 screws, 2 in the front and 1 in the back. I use a small wire bush and a pick to clean any crud or lacquer from the screws. Spray some cleaner down through the unit and blow it out. Spray some oil down the inside. This oil is to lubricate the screw threads to ease in removal. Put a drop of oil on the top front screw and wiggle it with a well fitting screw driver. This is the over travel screw, they usually come out easy. Next, a drop of oil on the lower front screw and give it a wiggle. This is the tension screw and has a spring under it. I have found loctite on these screws and have had to heat them but that is rare, just be careful and they should come out. Now the connector should come out. The connector is a small bent bar that rides on the trigger lever, it is also the piece that the sear actually contacts. The last screw adjusts the sear engagement. I have seen staked screws that simple would not come out, have also seen Loctite on these. Be patient, a little oil, a little wiggle, they usually come out. What you have left is the case with the trigger loosely swinging, now wash it out again. I use Q-tips and pipe cleaners to swap them out and then a final spray of cleaner. Blow it dry, spray with oil and blow out the excess oil.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
To go back together, lay the connector on the trigger. It goes in the front with the long edge on top facing the back. That top flat surface should be very smooth and clean. The top of the connector can be polished to help smooth up the feel and reduce creep. I polish them with a buffing wheel and flitz to a glass smooth mirror finish. Do not change any angles or remove metal. You can also polish the sear ledge that mates with the connector. Next, install the top over travel screw, it's the longer of the 2 with the pin tip. Run it in almost flush as the pin tip aligns with the hole in the connector and holds it in place. Next, the lower front spring and screw. This is the shorter of the pin tipped screws, run it in until a couple of threads are still showing. I should mention, I oil all the screw threads before I install them. Now the back screw. This screw sets the sear engagement by setting the limit on how far the connector moves under the sear, you can run in it about flush for now. Now put in the sear spring and position the sear in the unit using the mounting pins to hold everything in place. If the trigger feels really loose, turn the tensioning screw in a little, I find they are easier to adjust with a little tension. Pushing down on the sear with your thumb nail, turn the sear screw in until the sear drops. Back the screw out 1/2 turn. If movement stops before the sear drops, back the over travel screw out a little as it's keeping the trigger from moving far enough. Yes, you can run less engagement and yes you will get less creep but you can also get a dangerous trigger. Unless it's for competition only with the safety removed, use the 1/2 turn please. Once the sear is set, adjust the over travel screw. You can watch the sear and over travel adjustments through the window on the side. Holding the sear down, turn in the over travel screw until it stops then back it out 1/4 turn. This is the part where I like some pressure on the tension screw. It helps hold the trigger against the sear while adjusting the over travel.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Now the safety and bolt release lever go back on. Put the sear spring and sear in the unit with the front holes lined up. Install the front pin, tapered end first in the front hole from the left side. Drive this pin in slightly below flush so it does not interfere with the bolt lock. Now cam the unit into place for the rear pin, also tapered end first from the left side. Lay the bolt lock in the groove, position the spring under it and wiggle the pin a little. Align the trigger unit's rear hole and push the sear down so the pin goes over it. Takes a little finesse, resist the urge to beat it in. Once it's well started, tap it in until the pin is about flush with the bolt lock. You can now put in the bolt and check the trigger tension adjustment. What you really want is a positive pressure on the trigger in the uncocked position. I know, we all want a light trigger but keep in mind, this is what resets the trigger under the sear and keeps the safety from becoming the trigger.
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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Thank you limberjack.

This thread will be locked to prevent it's over crowding with questions.

RJ
 
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