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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking for some help to define my Browning 16 Gauge auto Everyone is baffled looking for an expert to help me figure out the serial number
 

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Is your gun a Remington built Browning or a Remington Model 11? Big differences between them.
If the serial number is on the side of the receiver and starts with an "A", it was made between 1940 and 1946
Welcome aboard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It is all marked Browning but the serial number throws us all for a loop its starts with a 7 And is a total of 4 digits with the one letter
 

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If it has a gold trigger it's from 1967 and should be marked 'Sweet Sixteen'. If a blued trigger, probably from 1957.
Other features? Where is the safety? Is the carrier two piece or one? Where is the serial number?
 

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Why is it Remington built if it has all Browning markings? What is the letter in the serial and where is it marked? Blued trigger and one piece carrier with the safety behind the trigger points to 1957, IF it's a Browning.
If it's a Remington made Browning, the serial will be on the side and the letter will be 'A'.

Browning/FN also contracted some guns with special features and serial ranges. One of the rarest is the A-5 Riot gun with 18 inch barrel and 7 shot magazine and extra long fore-end.
Is yours' a sporting gun with 'normal' barrel length? Rib or no rib? Solid rib or vent?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Contacted Browning directly gave them the serial number they told me between 41 and 46 But Remington would have the rest of the records in of course we can't get in touch with them For a more definitive date
 

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OK, it is an 'American Browning' made during the war. Remington doesn't have the dates, either except 'during the war'.
There are subtle differences between Rem and FN in the A-5. Much more differences between either of the A-5 and the M-11
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
My local gun dealer gunsmith very knowledgable Dateted maybe 41 or 42 My biggest issue is putting a value on it buying it from a family member nothing online seems to give us any indication of value
 

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Very sad to say the A-5s have taken a tremendous hit in value due to steel shot and the (cheap) reliability of gas guns with a wide variety of ammo. Only the 3" 20 ga. has held it's value and even increased. The American A-5 has some value as an oddity but as shooters they tend to be sub $300 range.
I see on gunsinternational dot com that Sweet Sixteens are bringing a big premium, too. Not sure why.
I had to nearly give away a 3" 12 A-5 with vent rib.
 

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American "Brownings" were made by Remington from 1946 to 1952. A letter prefix was also used, with "B" for 12 GA, "A" or "X" for 16 and "C" for 20. There weren't many A-5's produced by FN in the early post-war years.
 

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Very sad to say the A-5s have taken a tremendous hit in value due to steel shot and the (cheap) reliability of gas guns with a wide variety of ammo. Only the 3" 20 ga. has held it's value and even increased. The American A-5 has some value as an oddity but as shooters they tend to be sub $300 range.
I see on gunsinternational dot com that Sweet Sixteens are bringing a big premium, too. Not sure why.
I had to nearly give away a 3" 12 A-5 with vent rib.
I'd love to see where you're shopping for A5's, because they're anything but cheap these days. Since I have a weakness for A5's I'm always looking, and I haven't detected a dip in prices in at least 15 years.
 

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Just from personal experience in one market- I took a 1966 A-5 12 ga 3" 30" VR, 98% on a trade at $500. I left it on consignment for 2 1/2 years at $600 and finally cut it to $500 to sell it which lost me $75. It went to three gun shows during that time. Antidotal at best, of course.
Both gun shows had people actually buying M870s for more than Win M12s. In fact, I had a 95% M12 Duck 3" for two years at $500 and couldn't sell it. I GAVE it to a friend as a guest gun at his duck club.

If you see an A-5 on the rack, make an offer and probably be surprised. A local pawn shop had a straight gripped pre-war A-5 with a solid rib barrel and a shattered fore end for $300. I offered a hundred and we flipped for $100 or $125 and I won that. It took another $150 in parts to turn it into a quick load, re-choked shooter. Its my back-up gun on trips.

The A-5, 1911, Superposed and Win M61 represents the very best of JM Browning unless you have a Ma Deuce laying around then it could be added easily. All unique, different and elegant in design.
 

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Perhaps its just your area. A5 Magnums are always worth less because they're magnum only. Still, $600 is a pretty fair price for an A5 magnum in good shape. The A5 magnum is a pretty specialized gun, so they're just not in much demand.
I have noticed A5's do tend to go for less in areas where there's a lot of waterfowl hunting; which makes sense.

I tend to find Remington's going pretty cheap for your typical model 11. 16 & 20 ga guns go for a bit more, especially the 20 bores.

The middle gun in this photo was found at a local shop selling as a "gunsmith special", I paid $199. It was pretty ugly when I got it, covered in oil and gunk. I bought it for the barrel. 20ga 28 inch full rib barrels are rare and expensive, so I just figured I'd trash the rest of the gun and put the barrel on the bottom gun. But when I started cleaning it up, I found it was a Sportsman Model (just one grade up from the bottom) and everything was actually in pretty good shape. Put a spring kit in it, opened the choke up to SK1, and it's my favorite upland game gun these days. The finish is a little thin in places, but this is a working gun for me, not a collector. The fact that its less than perfect is great, so I never feel bad about dragging it through the scrub brush.

The A5's that are typically the most in demand are the Light 12's, Sweet 16's, and Light 20's. Those are hard to find at bargain prices anymore unless they're a bit trashed.

Still, I like your advice of "make an offer". I'll have to keep that in mind, perhaps some of those A5's are sitting a while...never hurts to ask.
102468
 

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The shop I went to work in just after school sold and average of two A-5s a day. It was the redneck holy grail and our lay-a-way rack sometimes had a hundred guns in it. SO, A-5s were a staple of the buttpad and repair business.
The A-5 is SO well done its hard not to have one around just to marvel at.
My dad shot a 16 ga. Model 11 he bought at the hardware store for $42 just after the war. When I was about 7 years old, he showed me how he could unload it by pulling on the barrel. I was hooked!

Trivia--- The very first piece of 'plastic' used in any US firearm is the piece of Dupont nylon in the rear of the Model 11 receiver. It's a 'bumper'. The first ones were linen phenolic but they crumble after a time.
 
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The shop I went to work in just after school sold and average of two A-5s a day. It was the redneck holy grail and our lay-a-way rack sometimes had a hundred guns in it. SO, A-5s were a staple of the buttpad and repair business.
The A-5 is SO well done its hard not to have one around just to marvel at.
My dad shot a 16 ga. Model 11 he bought at the hardware store for $42 just after the war. When I was about 7 years old, he showed me how he could unload it by pulling on the barrel. I was hooked!

Trivia--- The very first piece of 'plastic' used in any US firearm is the piece of Dupont nylon in the rear of the Model 11 receiver. It's a 'bumper'. The first ones were linen phenolic but they crumble after a time.
The shop I went to work in just after school sold and average of two A-5s a day. It was the redneck holy grail and our lay-a-way rack sometimes had a hundred guns in it. SO, A-5s were a staple of the buttpad and repair business.
The A-5 is SO well done its hard not to have one around just to marvel at.
My dad shot a 16 ga. Model 11 he bought at the hardware store for $42 just after the war. When I was about 7 years old, he showed me how he could unload it by pulling on the barrel. I was hooked!

Trivia--- The very first piece of 'plastic' used in any US firearm is the piece of Dupont nylon in the rear of the Model 11 receiver. It's a 'bumper'. The first ones were linen phenolic but they crumble after a time.
The shop I went to work in just after school sold and average of two A-5s a day. It was the redneck holy grail and our lay-a-way rack sometimes had a hundred guns in it. SO, A-5s were a staple of the buttpad and repair business.
The A-5 is SO well done its hard not to have one around just to marvel at.
My dad shot a 16 ga. Model 11 he bought at the hardware store for $42 just after the war. When I was about 7 years old, he showed me how he could unload it by pulling on the barrel. I was hooked!

Trivia--- The very first piece of 'plastic' used in any US firearm is the piece of Dupont nylon in the rear of the Model 11 receiver. It's a 'bumper'. The first ones were linen phenolic but they crumble after a time.
It's refreshing and "comforting" to find the strong interest in fine wood and steel. The Brownings and Winchesters...and others...bring back the scent of "fired paper cases" on a cool day. These shotguns, to me, are the best and in particular if they're wearing a solid-rib barrel!

Had a 20 GA American Browning for a bit....nice little shotgun, but lost in a theft a number of years ago.
 
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