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Discussion Starter #21
I just purchased one recently. It’s in 30.06 and is the same year as yours, I believe. However, mine is not drilled and tapped for a scope. Was yours done by the factory? I’d love to mount a scope on mine but I’d hate to destroy the originality of it
I'm not sure, it only has 3 holes, I took off the scope & mount and put a standard rail so I could mount a newer Scope.. The Bausch & Lamb had little black specs inside the glass, not sure if it was just the age that caused it or what.. I have far too many Rifles to pick just one to hunt with, lol..If you want to use your Rifle and need a Scope then have a Gun Smith drill and tap it.. Guns are made to be used not safe queens.. IMO.. Good Luck
 

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Kingfish, I'm not aware of any 760 that would rate in the collectible realm, but consider them to be in the user catagory. If you want to mount a scope to make it more useable I'd say "do it". I would however have a smith take on the job unless you are able to drill and tap inline, straight holes with the proper spacing.
 

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I'm not aware of any M760 that wasn't drilled and tapped with the four holes plugged with tiny screws.
The M740 came first and they were drilled, so I assume the same is true of the M760.

Does it have a 'gunk hole' forward of the trigger, inside the guard?

Glockman-- that's an especially nice 760 and one of the first made. They're rust blued and well fitted.- Just be warned, the 'safety' is not. It CAN fire anytime its loaded.
 

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Remington started tapping M760 receivers around 1955. Previous to that they were not normally factory drilled and tapped for scope mounts.



.
 

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Yours is not vintage, vintage 760s had the corncob forend!! Ive always been amazed with the Rem 760 as its a pump gun and they all shoot super accurate, every bit as accurate as a bolt action rifle for the most part, not so the auto version of the 760...Did you know the CIA issued them for that reason as assignation guns, but since the world law did not allow assignation it makes one wonder what the heck is that all about..oh well...The last one I owned was the later model in 35 Whelen, and its was a tack driver..Only downfall it they rattle like a BB in a box car while hunting, its the loose forearm set up..
 

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Discussion Starter #26 (Edited)
Yours is not vintage, vintage 760s had the corncob forend!! Ive always been amazed with the Rem 760 as its a pump gun and they all shoot super accurate, every bit as accurate as a bolt action rifle for the most part, not so the auto version of the 760...Did you know the CIA issued them for that reason as assignation guns, but since the world law did not allow assignation it makes one wonder what the heck is that all about..oh well...The last one I owned was the later model in 35 Whelen, and its was a tack driver..Only downfall it they rattle like a BB in a box car while hunting, its the loose forearm set up..
If you are referring about Mine not being Vintage, .. it is stamped ZZ that puts it 1953.. corn cob or not,,
 

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That is the first style 'corn-cob' fore end. I would still like to know if it has a gunk hole in the trigger guard.

One other thing about the Model760. They were used in two major civil rights murders: Medgar Evers and MLK.

One thing is for sure. The 760 will outlast the 740/742/7400 semi-autos by a considerable margin, but seldom is one shot to destruction. The internal parts are pretty much identical but hand operation is much less violent than by gas.
 
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I stand corrected I went back and enlarged the picture and that is the corn-cob fore end...A very nice gun..Belk and I had a friend named Scott McCracken, a gunsmith and his elk gun was a 35 Whelen Rem 760, and he had removed the iron sights front and rear sghts and installed a gold bead in front, and at the rear sight location, He lined up the two beads as one would do to shoot birds with a shotgun...It worked and he shot a number of elk at various ranges..I would never have believed it. He claimed it was fast in Idahos black timber...Still, I'll stick with a 3X leupold or a receiver in the thick stuff or across a canyon..
 

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Scott's Figure 8 sight. :)
That would be great in Trinitron on a carry gun, too.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
That is the first style 'corn-cob' fore end. I would still like to know if it has a gunk hole in the trigger guard.

One other thing about the Model760. They were used in two major civil rights murders: Medgar Evers and MLK.

One thing is for sure. The 760 will outlast the 740/742/7400 semi-autos by a considerable margin, but seldom is one shot to destruction. The internal parts are pretty much identical but hand operation is much less violent than by gas.
Explain Gunk Hole Please?
 

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The 'Gunk hole' (Remington name) is located inside the trigger guard forward of the trigger. It drains the 'gunk' out of a blind space that builds debris and adversely affects sear engagement and the safety of the trigger mechanism. The safety does NOT prevent the gun from firing.
The gunk hole was in response to full auto fire from Model 740s and remains there today.
 
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