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Discussion Starter #1
I have an old Remington Model 241 .22 rifle (a great-uncle to the Browning take-down .22 rifle currently being sold) and the removable barrel isn't as tight as I'd like.

I'm about to decide that the only thing to be done is to send the rifle to a proper repair facility but thought that I'd make one more attempt to at least understand how the barrel clearance is adjusted.

As best I can tell the Model 241 barrel tightness is controlled by the interrupted-screw thread which lines the input to the receiver. I believe that the interrupted-screw is locked-down by the screw which is on the right side of the receiver (the take-down on/off button being on the left side of the receiver). Unfortunately some previous owner partially messed-up the flat-blade screwdriver head of the interrupted-thread locking screw so I can't get it to loosen (afraid I'll mess-up the screw beyond where it can be removed by a gunsmith).

Can anyone tell me if I have correctly diagnosed how the interrupted-screw is loosened (so it can then be rotated to tighten-up the removable barrel) ?

- PaulN
 

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IIRC there are two types or ways to attach the barrel. If the below is not correct, say so and I'll do some digging.

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Be careful with the below design, there are 2 tiny plungers and 2 tiny springs. The forearm holds the parts in place during usage.

A common method, as used by the Browning Auto-22, is a nut threaded onto the barrel. Remove the forearm and turn the nut so that it moves towards the receiver, a click or two should be all it takes.

You might need to remove the barrel to get a "click" on the adjustment. When finished, the joint should not wobble.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
IIRC there are two types or ways to attach the barrel. If the below is not correct, say so and I'll do some digging.

~~~

Be careful with the below design, there are 2 tiny plungers and 2 tiny springs. The forearm holds the parts in place during usage.

A common method, as used by the Browning Auto-22, is a nut threaded onto the barrel. Remove the forearm and turn the nut so that it moves towards the receiver, a click or two should be all it takes.

You might need to remove the barrel to get a "click" on the adjustment. When finished, the joint should not wobble.
Perhaps I wasn't sufficiently clear in my description.

With the Remington Model 241 the barrel tightening adjustment IS NOT associated with the removable barrel. (I am familiar with the Browning semi-automatic .22 take-down rifle and the tightening ring which encircles its barrel; the Remington Model 241 does not use that technique to tighten the barrel.)

With the Remington Model 241 the barrel has a simple thread on the end which goes into the receiver and it is in the receiver assembly where the barrel tightening is accomplished. Imagine a very short tube which is threaded on both its inside and its outside. The thread on the exterior is continuous and this is screwed into a threaded opening in the rifle's receiver. The thread on the interior of the tube is interrupted and it is this surface into which the barrel screws. When the very short tube (threaded on both its interior and exterior) is not locked-down to the receiver (into which it is screwed via its exterior threads) it can be rotated slightly (within the threaded opening of the receiver) and this is the method used to tighten down the barrel as rotating the very short tube within the receiver causes the interrupted-threads on the inside of the very short tube to also rotate. This slight rotation of the interrupted screw changed ever-so-slightly the depth of the barrel where it pulls up snugly against the receiver when it is inserted into the interrupted screw (which is itself screwed into the threaded opening in the receiver). Rotating the very short tube (threaded on both its outside and inside) sets the depth of the barrel when it is inserted into the receiver.

The thing that I am not completely sure of (but am reasonably so) is precisely how that very short tube (threaded on both its inside and outside) is held fast in the threaded opening in the receiver once the desired barrel tightness is reached. I believe that a screw on the right side of the receiver is what tightens that very short tube (threaded on both the inside and outside) in the receiver.

I hope that my description can be followed; this is one of those situations where a picture would be worth (easily) a thousand words.

Regards;

- PaulN
 

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~ Remove fore-end.
~ Remove barrel adjusting bushing lock screws from front end of receiver.
~ Push out barrel adjusting bushing lock right side front of receiver, (not threaded).
~ Turn barrel adjusting bushing slightly in direction indicated by arrow on front end of receiver.
~ Replace barrel adjusting bushing lock to engage bushing, turn to proper position to be locked by lock screw in front of receiver.
 
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