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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone here have any experience with the old Remington Model 25 in 25-20? They just look cool to me, and was wondering if they were good solid guns or troublesome.

Steve
 

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Can only reply in a comparison with the model 14. The 25 was a miniaturized version of the 14. They were Pedersen designs and proven to be good shooters. Have at times searched for a 25 but they always seemed pricey when I looked.
 

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Compared with Winchester and FN repeaters of the period, Remington guns were 'soft' in heat-treat and rather short-lived. It's not often we find a well used Remington that still works. They tend to be 'near new' or broke.
 

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Compared with Winchester and FN repeaters of the period, Remington guns were 'soft' in heat-treat and rather short-lived. It's not often we find a well used Remington that still works. They tend to be 'near new' or broke.
I had heard the same thing from and old timer gun dealer. His suggestions was not to spend too much time looking for one. I just thought they looked cool. Oh well !

Steve
 

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To expound just a little on the above assertion, because I know of no actual comparative test for longevity in similar rifles.

Looking at the innards of multiple guns that aren't working, teaches the gunsmith a lot about weaknesses and commonly found failures in families of guns.
It's easy to compare models nearly the same from different makers. The Remington Model 12/121 and Winchester Model 61 were competing, sports, .22 pump guns at the same time in the US. In Europe, they were buying the FN Trombone for more money but of the same design.
During that same period, Remington made the Model 24/241 while FN made the same gun as the FN Auto. (Today, it's the Browning 'slim-waist' 22 Auto made first in Belgium, now Japan.)

All of these guns are circulating through the gun market and still fairly common. An indicator of how long lived they are is seen in used prices better than the high condition 'collector's' guns. Any .22 rifle from 1940 that's still in the factory box with hanging tags will bring a premium price. Which well used gun will be bought to use and maybe later restore is the real question. Those are the guns that will live multiple generations and never become 'long parts' in a stack in the back corner of gunshops and flea markets.

Here's a hundred dollar 'barn gun' that is like new inside. I think its' been shot more since the rebuild than before, thanks to the affordability of 22Win Auto ammo.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So those are the 1903 models. I have a couple of the Model 63's that shoots the regular 22 LR. Basically same rifles. I have been trying to find an 03 at a reasonable price. They have gone up in the last few years. Ammo is still at about $14 a box or so. They are beautiful rifles though especially that high grade one.

Steve
 

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A great example of 'hoarding' ammo. 1903s were REALLY cheap when ammo was gone for them. I bought several that came into the shop on trades. I bought a collector grade Deluxe '03 for $300 in 1976. It sold in 'Vegas for $2500 with a brick of ammo in Y2K.
I had four '03s when one above came along for $100 at a gunshow. I didn't want it but talked my 'bestest buddy' into buying it and letting me 'clean it up' some for him. He had a brick of original ammo and wanted some of my work. Several years after I finished it, Aquilla made a run of ammo and we both bought a case for less than $15 a brick. I guess his son has the gun and ammo now and there's no reason not to shoot it.
I have several Model 63s and still have an '03....with Brit proofs. I think they're the finest .22 auto ever made. The Model 03 roller bearing bolt still gives me a thrill for some reason. ;)

Just to be clear--The two guns pictured above are before and after photos of the same gun.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Dis you do all the checkering and the engraving? Wow that rifle turned out beautiful, Amazing results....

Steve
 

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Thank you. I did everything but the checkering. Natalie Oikawa in Silverthorn, CO did that nice job.
There is a set of Talley rings with a new Leupold-Lyman 2 1/2x for it, too. I dovetailed the receiver for the rings.

The gold inlay is more of a personal touch. The owner of the gun (now gone) was my very closes friend in grade school. We hunted arrowheads and played Indian in the swamps. The head on the right side is a Tallahassee point about 7500 years old. The arrowhead on the left side is a Wendover point from about the same period. He stayed in Tally all his life. I moved West.
He only had three years to enjoy the gun and he fondled it every day. He was a wildlife artist of some note. He gave me prints of all his work.
I drove to Florida last year to shoot his ashes over our fishing lake from my cannon.
He left a hole that can't be filled with his voice but the memories overflow....

His name was Jim Dollar so I put it on the tang for him.
 

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Remingtons of a bygone era in excellent condition, like the Remington model 17, the Remington model 14/141, the Remington model 25, etc., are all excellent firearms if they have been treated with respect from the day they were owned.

Some of these rifles now are 100 years old or thereabouts.

They are light, well-balanced, great shooters.

If you happen to find one for a reasonable price, by all means buy it. I don’t believe you will be in anyway disappointed.

The 25-20 is an extremely fun little cartridge to shoot, and since it is derived from a black powder cartridge, it’s chamber pressure is not incredibly robust, so if the Remington model 25 you acquire has been well cared for, it will probably last you the remainder of your life if you care for it the same way.

A comment made by someone who owns all of the guns listed above, and enjoys them for the treasures they are.
 

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Remingtons of a bygone era in excellent condition, like the Remington model 17, the Remington model 14/141, the Remington model 25, etc., are all excellent firearms if they have been treated with respect from the day they were owned.

Some of these rifles now are 100 years old or thereabouts.

They are light, well-balanced, great shooters.

If you happen to find one for a reasonable price, by all means buy it. I don’t believe you will be in anyway disappointed.

The 25-20 is an extremely fun little cartridge to shoot, and since it is derived from a black powder cartridge, it’s chamber pressure is not incredibly robust, so if the Remington model 25 you acquire has been well cared for, it will probably last you the remainder of your life if you care for it the same way.

A comment made by someone who owns all of the guns listed above, and enjoys them for the treasures the are.
I have one that can ring a 12” gong at 200 yds.with two or three shooters. Armidillos and jack rabbits really do not like that little rifle. Normana
 
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