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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, I am trying to identify the model of my fathers shotgun however am not able to gain access to it for some weeks. It is a Remington break open 12G and I suggest was manufactured in the 1960's or early 70's (I think my father purchased it 2nd hand in the late 1970's).

I have scoured the internet however cant find a match.

Any thoughts on model would be appreciated.

Thanks, J
 

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Pretty difficult to tell you anything about a gun without a picture or model number. If you remember what the gun looks like you could google or search gunbroker and try and find a match.
Was it a single shot or double barrel?
 

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IF it is an over/under, then it is a 3200.

This a fine shotgun, maybe the besst. It is a reintroduced the classic Remington 32, renamed the 3200. It was designed by John Browning and improves on some of his earlier Superposed designs.
 

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IF it is an over/under, then it is a 3200.

This a fine shotgun, maybe the besst. It is a reintroduced the classic Remington 32, renamed the 3200. It was designed by John Browning and improves on some of his earlier Superposed designs.
I thought that the 32 was designed by a Remington Engineer C. C. Loomis. The 32 and Superposed guns are quite different.

I am also pretty sure that John Browning never got a chance to improve the Superposed. My friend is a Superposed fanatic. The story that he relayed to me is that John Browning and his son were reviewing the first 5 Superposed guns built (pre-production). After reviewing them, John excused himself and said that he felt sick and was going to go die. He passed on a short time after. This is my friends story, not mine. Wiki does not confirm that. Browning did die in 1926 and the Superposed did not actually go into production until 1931. His son finished the final changes to the design (tweaks) before it went into production.

Hate to be picky, but I am a 3200 fanatic. The 3200 started production in 1973. So that is what it could be if he bought it used in the late 70's.

If the shotgun is a side by side, it cold be a 1900, which was made from 1900 to 1910.

The only other possibility of something later than that would be as was mentioned, a Parker.
 

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I'm a Superposed fanatic and proud of it.

The 32/3200 Remington is still alive as the Kreighoff. the sliding breech cover design was also used by licence from Remington in the Savage Model 330, I think it was. There are many variations of that basic design. Loomis was the inventor, AFAIK.
 

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I know what they say about making assumptions but one would assume if his father had a 3200 the son would at least enough knowledge about firearms to know what it was, you had to be a real shot-gunner and gun enthusiast to own a 3200 in the late 70's, they were never inexpensive.
My guess is it's a much older side by side or single shot.
I could be wrong, were all guessing including me.
 

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I'm a Superposed fanatic and proud of it.

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I am certainly an admirer of them as well. I have never had a good opportunity to get one. I saw one a Cabela's a while back for $1,100. It was certainly hunted with, but appeared in good shape. Had a fundage issue at the time.

You can get some good deals at Cabela's if you know what you are looking for. I saw a nice Remington 32 less than $1,000 a while back. They sometimes only mark their guns up a certain %, so if they get a deal from an estate, so do you. The 32 was already pending, so I missed it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks all for the feedback - the gun is a single shot and I don't believe it was an expensive weapon as it was simply the farm shot-gun. Dad bought it along with a new Brno .22 at the time and fitted a Parker Hale 4x40 scope - I have used that rifle regularly on rabbits and foxes since purchase and it still punches with awesome accuracy and consistency today after many thousands of rounds!

I will wait until I can get my hands on the Remington again and check it over for a model number. Will let you all know the outcome.

Thanks all, J.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Found it online - it is a Remington 812 however appears that this model was made in Brazil by a company called CBC and imported into both Canada and the US and this one found its way down under to here in Australia.

Now that this is done does anyone have any knowledge or experience with this model - in my opinion it is like a good tractor in that it goes when you need it to go however it is not necessarily a comfortable ride!

Cheers, J.
 

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Looks like the old FIE break over. I think they were made in Brazil too. Interesting. Never seen the Remington.
 

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That was one of Remington's contract guns that were not sold in the U.S.. I've seen them with several names attached.
 

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That was one of Remington's contract guns that were not sold in the U.S.. I've seen them with several names attached.
Interesting, only ones imported to Canada were marked Remington? Weird, you would think if they were sold here they would be sold as Remingtons or maybe they weren't sold here.
Have any idea why Jack?
 

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Trying to figure out firearms marketing strategy is about like trying to figure out women. I quit trying on both about the same time.

All I have is vague references at various trade shows. At one time the Remington trademark was worth much more than now. Remington sold the worn out Nylon 66 tooling to CBC many years ago and it could be some of the price was paid in cheap SS shotguns. CIL in Canada imported the Remington marked Brazilian guns about the same time Remington was upgraded the ammo plant....there could have been some trading going on there, too.

Re-marked imports have been a staple for many decades and sometimes muddies up the genealogy, but future gun collectors have an open field. Just think of the display to be made out of Ithaca LSA, S&W1500, Weatherby Vanguard and Howa-marked rifles. There has to be a hundred variations just in that one model rifle.
 
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