Shooters Forum banner

1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,168 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have only one gun that I used a barrel break-in procedure on. It was a new 1894 that I plan to use lead bullets in and I wanted the barrel to be prepared and easy to clean. I figured a systematic break in procedure may give me the desired results. It remains to be seen because the season caught me and I had to go ahead and use the 240 gr XTP in it for now in the little 44 lever. It does clean easy and the barrel is smooth and shiny. It will be on a steady diet of cast bullets next season though.

Here is my question. Can you do any thing or should there be something done to a barrel on a gun that is not new or after you lap it or something like that? It seems like a good thourough cleaning and then using a break in process could only do good things for a bore. What is the forums thoughts on this?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
24 Posts
Looking down the barrels of a few Marlin 1894's I have to say most are pretty rough. I have one that you can easily see the tool marks in, and it leads up fast with any serious cast load. It shoots real good for short sessions and is getting better.

I also prefer cast bullets in these calibers, and counting handguns, I have used this proceedure to get the barrel up and running. Take it home and with a bore guide, always a bore guide, and coated rod, thouroughly clean the bore with RemClean and a tight patch 'til no more black crud comes out. Remove the RemClean with Hoppe's or something like that. You'll be amazed at how much "stuff" comes out without a shot. Start shooting with a 50 rd box of Federal Eagles or something in that class, and bang away. Take it home and clean all of the jacket fouling out with a bore brush and a copper remover 'til the green is gone. Then another round of RemClean. You're usually ready for lead. Remove the lead with the Remclean and tight patch, and you'll find that it takes less effort for each cycle.

I have never had the nerve for fire lapping, and the configuration of the Marlin Ballard rifling is to have sharp corners to grip the bullet securely. The mild abraisives don't really work the edges too bad, but do remove burrs and tool marks that snag lots o lead. I also place a wadded rag in the open receiver to prevent huge flakes of lead from jamming up the internals.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top