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I own a couple revolvers. An S&W 66 (with hole) a 629 (no hole) and a Ruger super red hawk 454. About a year ago I sent the 66 in the S&W performance center for there master revolver action package. This included the following: Trigger stop, chamfer charge holes, polish rebound spring, hammer stud and yoke barrel bosses, detail lockwork surfaces, stone hammer and trigger contact areas, test fire for function. This improved the trigger a lot but it could still be sweater. I have been wanting to have some work done on the 629 and super red hawk. I recently purchased the “Trigger Job DVD” from GunVideo. In it Jerry shows the stoning of a few surfaces that smith did not do. He also installs a new trigger rebound spring and main spring. (These require federal primers). In the next couple of weeks I am thinking of working over the 629 depending on how that goes I might do some more work on the 66. (I may even tinker with the Ruger. Is there a good source on Ruger trigger work out there?) Does anyone have any tips for messing with the 629? What do other folks use for springs? I do mostly double action shooting. I carry the 66 a lot and the 629 is my woods gun so I would want both to be 100% reliable. I also want both revolvers to feel very close to one another, so that practice with one carries over to practice with the other. What do you think of this and what do other folks do?
 

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You can probably leave the mainspring alone. It will help guarantee ignition. Replacing the rebound spring is usually enough. If you have the three spring kit, consider trying the middle one first, then if it is too heavy or too light you only have one move to make, not two. Take a look at the rubbing of the parts and feel the roughness of the surfaces. You will quickly see which parts will benefit from light stoning to smooth the interface areas. If you have forged parts, they are usually casehardened and the casehardening layer is very thin so don’t stone things too much and cut through it. If they are MIM parts, they should be through hardened. They will probably be rougher and more difficult to smooth, but once you get them polished up, I feel they provide a better trigger pull than the forged parts. fficeffice"
<O:p</O:p
If it is one of the newer ones with the frame mounted firing pin, you may want to replace the pin with a slightly longer one. I like the Cylinder & Slide Shop one that Brownell’s carries, but there is at least one more from someone else.<O:p</O:p
<O:p</O:p
Smoothing the internals of a revo isn’t rocket science. Just take your time.<O:p</O:p
 

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If you have mim parts LEAVE THEM ALONE!!! Only the surface is hardened and once it is gone your part will wear out in no time.

If your hammer has a nose on it, you are OK. If your hammer is flat on the front and transfers its energy through a transfer bar...it is MIM. Mim parts often have a trough on the side of it.

I'm pretty sure that a N frame gun (629) (never seen the inside of one) is the same design as a K frame (66) and L frame.

Another thing, leave your hand alone. I like to lightly hone the sides of the flat parts...like the aligator, and the hammer block...not that it does anything.

Also, on match guns, they shorten the thumb release spring, so that the rod in the center, of the back of the cylinder pushes the latch back. Proceed w/caution here...even though that spring is not really needed. I prefer to have a real weak spring in there (you take the thumb release off and watch out for a projectile). Also, make sure that the piece that the cylinder release bolts to is not rubbing on the hammer (you'd fix that w/a file). If the hammer rubs on it, do it, if not LEAVE IT ALONE.

Also, for a defense gun, I'd leave the main spring alone and just mess w/the rebound spring.

My Ruger 101 has the stock mainspring, and middle Wolf Rebound spring and its action is pretty darn good.

In general, a lighter rebound spring is all that you need. S&W will be reluctant to tamper w/their original design and the rebound spring is a safety feature as it pushes the hammer back, which allows the aligator (the real name escapes me) to block the hammer>
 

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I've tuned several K Frames and I'm with the others about the main spring and rebound spring. Keep the main spring for reliable ignition. I would only go lighter if I was using this revolver for competition only. Paper targets don't shoot back if your ammo doesn't off. The rebound spring can be replaced with a lighter one and will lighten the trigger pull some. I never change the sufaces that touch each other on the internal parts but I do polish the sides that rub against the frame, then only lightly. I also polish the inside of the frame. But go easy on any polishing. You can take steel off but you can't put it back. I got a great deal in a Model 19 S&W several years ago that had been "tuned" until it didn't work any more. If you're not sure about doing the work youself, find a good gunsmith. By the way, my favorite old K frame is a model 19 that has gone through several thousand rounds of .38s. It seems to get sweeter all the time. Put some rounds through whatever you've got. The pistol may "wear in" and you may develop some muscles and techniques. Trigger time is good for both shooter and weapon.
 
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