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Discussion Starter #1
How long does it take to clean your rifle? It usually take me about an hour and a truck load of patches. I here people talk about cleaning quickly with only a few patches. I do ocassionally do this with a gun that I am shooting more regular. I will swab it a time or two and oil it. No point scrubbing one when I will shoot it again in a day or two.
But back to the question. I will soak the barrel with a loose patch or two. Let soak. Then go at it with dry patches. Typically I will use a bore brush at different times. I will repeat till the the patches come out clean. Now, the real question is how tight are your patches. When I am running a real tight patch, it has to be bumped through with the palm of my hand. I mean it is really tight. Am I running these through too tight? Running the really tight patches I have cut a lot crap out of barrels that were supposedly clean. Any helpful hints would be appreciated.
Chris
 

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IMO you're doing fine. I too have problems periodically trying to force a patch into the barrel. When that happens I just switch from the cotton patch to a finer felt type patch. As you stated, a tight patch does clean the barrel gunk out. And it takes me some time to clean my rifle to my satisfaction. I've watched a lot of guys clean there guns and it's amazing how sloppy they are with the brushes, patches and over coating with oil.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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See this thread, about 14 posts down.

http://www.shootersforum.com/showthread.php?threadid=5883

A tight patch is good, up to the point that the cleaning rod starts to flex and rub up against the rifling. If you want to make a patch really reach down into the grooves, wrap it around an undersized nylon brush.
 

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It depends on several factors as to how long it takes me to clean a rifle.
Some of these factors are; ammo - corrosive or not, black pdwr, or lead vrs jacketed bullets.
Bore condition: a pitted rough bore will take me longer to clean.
Ammount of copper fowling in the bore: takes a bit longer to clean those.

Normally it takes about a hour to clean my 94 Win 30-30's.
I ususally start by running a saturated bronze brush through the barrel to get the solvent in the groves and break loose any chunks of powder or whatever.

Then while the bore is soaking I use various tooth brushes to clean the action.
Then patches to clean out the solvent. After that I will decide weather or not to soak the bore with solvent, turn the gun muzzel down and let it soak and drain overnight. This gets a lot of the copper out.
Or weather to swab it out and oil it and put it away till next time.
 

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Beartooth Regular
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If you are shooting jacketed bullets and use a copper solvent and brush, make sure you aren't using a bronze brush while using the copper solvent. A nylon brush works well for scrubbing the copper.

I tend to use a good powder and lead solvent, take your pick, but I like Hoppes. Then patch the bore dry. A lot of folks at this point will recommend using a neutralizer or something like brake cleaner to remove all oil and solvent residue. Then run a soaked patch of copper solvent. I prefer Sweets 7.62, but I've heard some good reports of the Barnes copper solvent. I try to get a soaking in the bore of the Sweets then let sit for 10-15 minutes. Sweets will pit the bore if left in too long, don't make that mistake. Use the directions on the bottle. I follow with scrubbing with a Sweets soaked NYLON brush. Then patch dry. If you are still getting a blue colored patch after cleaning, reapply the Sweets and do the operation over again. When patches are coming out clean, I then apply a patch of oil and swab dry.

This works on some of the old really rough Ruger barrels. The Wilson barrels used in the 80's are as rough as any that I have come across. They all seem to shoot really well if kept clean, but usually require an aggressive copper cleaning routine.

I've heard some great things about a foaming cleaner called "Wipeout", but have yet to use it.

A couple of things that are very important when using an ammonia type solvent such as Sweets or the Barnes product. One do not leave in the bore longer than recommended. You may pit the bore if you do. Two, don't mix with other solvents, either completely dry the bore between using the powder solvent or use some type a neutralizer. Third, make sure to dry the bore completely after using and apply a light coating of oil (remove before the next shooting session). Ammonia will attract moisture and rust your bore if trace amounts are left in the bore.

Oh yeah, its best to use the copper solvents outside. You need some good ventilation, and if you are married, your wife may kick you out of the house because of the smell. That stuff stinks.

As suggested by MikeG in another thread, if the bore is rough and requires too much time cleaning, a lapping job is probably in order. A smooth, lapped barrel will save you a lot of cleaning time.
 

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maybe a bore snake will do for a quick clean if your gonna fire later on or next day hi yall
 

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I'm with Mike, thats just what I do, then after all that is done, I use some flitz paste,run a patch of it threw, let it set for a few, then buff it out, man you want to talk about polished, I also noticed the barrel will not foul as quick if you did not use the flitz. Hand lapping at its best;) Aim small hit small. RAMbo.
 

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Good info but we missed a few things here.

1St get a BORE GUIDE. You can buy a cheap plastic one or a more expensive one but they all work bascally the same. When you run a patch through the rifle you may get the barrel clean but pick up contamination from the forcing cone which means you drag more dirt into the barrell and your caught in a catch 22. The bore guide ensures you push the patches directly in to the barrel and avoids picking up any other crud.

If that does not work~

Get a chamber plug. A chamber plug allows you to fill the barrel up with solvent and let it soak overnight. Dump out the sovent and brush/patch away.



:D
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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I go through patches like a lot of women go through toilet paper! Have to buy in the big 1,000 count bags and always buy when I spot a sale on them. To somewhat conserve, I'll keep the ones that are merely solvent/oil stained toward the latter stages of cleaning to reuse the next cleaning session. These get used first to push out the black fouling gunk and initial solvent soaking of the bores. A squeeze bottle with a small orifice is used to apply the solvent to soaked, but not dripping patches. Bore guides are used in all cases except the lever actions and semi-autos where a guide is impracticable. A saturated bore snake works in these cases.

Once the black stuff is cleaned out to manageable levels, clean patches are saturated with MPro-7 and run down the barrel. This is followed by saturated bronze bristle brushes (tight) with resaturation every 10 strokes. Usually run about 50 strokes per barrel. Since there are normally 4 - 5 firearms to clean each time, the gun is set aside with the MPro-7 soaking until all guns have been treated accordingly. Then, clean patches to remove the solvent and remaining fouling. With a squeaky fouling clean bore, the WIPEOUT is injected into the bore and left to sit for a minimum of 24 hours. That's right - 24 hours, as recommended by the manufacturer! Care is taken to assure the bores are level, via gun vises or secure propping.

When a patch is run to clear the WIPEOUT, it will be a very dark blue when shooting jacketed bullets. An application of WIPEOUT is repeated for the following days until the blue stain is gone. Some bores clean within a couple applications, some require up to a half dozen treatments. Once the stain is gone, clean drying patches are run and a patch with a very light synthetic oil is swabbed down the bore.

Works for me!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Then, clean patches to remove the solvent and remaining fouling. With a squeaky fouling clean bore, the WIPEOUT is injected into the bore and left to sit for a minimum of 24 hours. That's right - 24 hours, as recommended by the manufacturer! Care is taken to assure the bores are level, via gun vises or secure propping
kdub, is the wipeout amonnia based or have a very foul odor.
As of now and for a while later I am cleaning the guns in my bedroom. Well usually clean outside and bring them back in. Just curious if a bore setting with this stuff will run me out.
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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No, the WIPEOUT is NOT ammonia based and has a rather pleasant odor, compared to most bore solvents (Hoppe's #9 remains my family of female's favorite solvent - they love the smell of it!) The manufacturer recommends the 24 - 36 hour treatment and guarantees no bore damage. The owner of the product is a shooter also, and is always interesting to talk to over the phone when ordering. It is a little more expensive than some cleaners, but "you get what you pay for" certainly applies in this case.

Takes a bit to learn how to use without excessive waste. Using bore guides, I put a large plastic soda straw on the nozzle of the can, try to hold can as near vertical as possible and carefully press the top to inject the foam slowly until it shows at the muzzle. After proper cleaning, the bores always look as shiny as a baby's bottom!
 

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"Bad Joke Friday" Dan (moderator emeritus)
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Last year I noted a "cleaning your rifle" thread on the Accurate Reloading forum and found Wipeout to be the most preferred lotion. I talked to the gentleman on the phone and Kdub's comment about being interesting to talk to is sure true. I use the product and it has performed as advertised, with minimal. During our initial conversation, the gentleman insisted I try the product on a firearm that I though was thoroughly cleaned so I could see the different....the patch from the cleaned rifle comes out discolored.

The owner also stressed that Wipeout is for copper removal and not for lead removal. He indicated he had an newly dveloped lead remover, but couldn't package it as the can containers he had access to used lead for the can's seams...obviously a rather self defeating adventure.

Dan
 
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