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Discussion Starter #1
Anybody do any handgun competition shooting? I have been shooting since I was about 13 but I've never had any training except in the Army(40 years ago). I recently joined a club and we have four ranges.

I think I want to start learning the Bullseye style shooting. I don't know the first thing about it other than the fact that you shoot three pistols...45, .22 and your choice. I have: a Browning Buckmark, a Ruger Mark III and three different 1911's. Are there any competition magazines being published? Any suggestions?
 

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You can get training material, match rules and a list of accredited matches in your area from the NRA.
 

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If your club doesn't hold bullseye matches or have any bullseye shooters I would start by calling around to other ranges--somebody is bound to know where you might find a match. The NRA has a publication called "Competitive Shooter" or something like that--I used to get it when I was an active competitor. It comes out monthly like the "American Rifleman" but with a much lower circulation as generally only regular match shooters subscribe to it. Anyway, it lists all the different matches by states--type of match, dates, and address or phone no. of the match director. You have the equipment to get started--you need a spotting scope which doesn't have to be an expensive one. 20X is enough magnification to see .22 bullet holes at 50 yds. In my opinion, and I am a holder of the distinguished pistol shot and distinguished rifleman medals, NRA three gun, or "bullseye" matches (and practice) are the best training for ALL the pistol disciplines. If you become reasonably proficient at bullseye--reach Sharpshooter level or higher--you could enter an action pistol or PPC match and do fairly well. I don't think it works the other way around--most action pistol shooters have never developed the kind of trigger discipline that is necessary for bullseye shooting, and they shoot at bigger targets at shorter ranges. In fact, many good bullseye shooters who take up highpower rifle shooting usually do well too. Watch the front sight!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys. I appreciate the advice. My club holds matches and has an active event schedule. I just don't know any of people yet. We have Bullseye matches next Saturday and Sunday and I'm gonna' be there asking all kinds of stupid questions. Maybe someone will have pity on me and take me under their wing. NRA membership is required of all our members and I'm on my way to their website when I finish this. I'm definitely most interested in Bullseye. I'm not planning on entering anything next weekend. I think I should just observe at first, as I've never even seen one of the matches.

Thanks again.
 

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IMO, starting out in NRA Bullseye with a .22 rimfire is the way to go! The rimfire is both accurate and relatively inexpensive. Once you've learned the shooting sequences, you can move up to the larger calibers if you wish. You will need a quality .22 with adjustable sights as well as some quality ammunition. No need for match ammunition while you're learning, just good ammunition will do because part of the match is shooting at 50 yards or a reduced size equivalent target. As a previous poster suggested, get yourself a spotting scope. Mine is a 20X Busnell which is good enough to see .22 cal. bullet holes in a target at 50 yards. Best wishes!
 
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