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Discussion Starter #1
I am using RCBS 3die set, for my 45 Colt. Winchester brass new unfired as well as once fired Winchester brass that has been trimmed to size. I am full lenght sizing the brass. Trying to crimp on a hornady 300 xtp as well as 255 gr lead.
I am putting a pretty heavy crimp on my reloads. And every time I roll one on it shaves just the tinest sliver of brass off the end of the brass.
is this something I'm doing or is it a problem with the die ( brand new), or just a normal result of the crimping process?
thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, I will try that soon as I get home. Loading for my Win. Legacy @23 gr of H110. To use for deer this fall.
She's a hoot to shoot with 16 gr 2400 and a 255 cast,accurate too. But dirty to shoot. Must be a cleaner powder for plinking. Any suggestions?
 

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Yes, lighten up a bit. You are actually pushing the case past the smaller diameter section (end) of the crimp shoulder in the die. This is where the "shaving" is occurring.

With crimping jacketed  in the crimp groove, it is easy to over-crimp and start to distort the mouth of the case. Cast bullets can have a crimp groove that actually tends to be too deep, with the crimp die not being able to "roll" the case mouth into the bottom of the crimp groove. Hence their is a look of the case not being crimped enough.

I've taken a taper crimp die and crimped the case into the driving band on some cast designs just ahead of the crimp groove. Seems to work very well and has better holding power and doesn't take much crimp either. A Lee Factory crimp die can be employed in the same manner.


Regards
 

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I solved this problem on 454 Cassull and 45 Colt by crimping in a separate step after seating the bullet.
 

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To be more specific, use a crimp die with the seating stem removed or just turn your stem up so there is no contact with the bullet.  That way there is no bullet movement while the crimp is applied.
 
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