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Discussion Starter #1
Gentlemen...

As I sift through the plethora of loads for the .45-70, I see data for the Hornady 350 gr. RNSP for the levergun class of actions.  Am I justified in being a little nervous about a mag tube detonation?  Until recently I have been shooting single shot rifles, for which there is no such consideration.  

The question is...Is the profile of that bullet pointed enough to fire the primer of the following round during recoil?

All input is greatly appreciated.

Cordially,

Smith
 

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Beartooth Regular
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Hi, Smith:
   Hornady has data for them in the #4 manual, with loads to 1900 fps in the Marlin, so I'd GUESS they're OK. Might be a good idea to check with them.
<a href="http://www.hornady.com/

Bye" target="_blank">http://www.hornady.com/

Bye</a>
Jack
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Was just flipping through the latest Midway catalog and noticed that they list TWO 350 gr. .45 cal rifle bullets from Hornady, one a round nose and one a flat nose.  No explanation given in the catalog for the difference.

Guess one is for lever guns and the other any other action type?  Don't know.

I'd definitely call Hornady.
 

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I called Hornady  and asked the same question about 6 years ago.  The answer is (paraphrased) we've shot many thousands of these in tube-fed rifles with no problems.   Hornady is (IMHO) a very litgation-sensitive company given the conservative nature of their 45-70 data.  

Concerning the FN hornady vs the RN.  The RN has a heavier jacket and is specifcally designed for 458 winmag velocities where the 350 FN is of lighter construction designed to dependably expand at 450 marlin velocities.

As I understand, mag tube detination is a very rare event.  Even if it does happen, since the mag tube is not all that strong and does not contain the gases at all, the chances of getting hurt are even slimmer.  The worst-case scenario is a damaged mag tube and a bruised ego if anyone sees it happen.

If you are still concerned, there are a few things you can do to further reduce your chances of it happening.  Starline brass produces 45-70 brass with the primer pocket cut about .006" deeper than spec.  You can also use a mil-spec primmer that is tougher than the run-of the-mill primer.  Further, Starline is/soon will be producing a 45-70 cases with a small-primer pocket that is also .006 deeper.  What all this does is make it much more difficult for the bullet tip to reach the primer of the round ahead of it.  THis information is based on several indirect discussions I've had with Tim Sundles at Buffalo Bore.  His need for such a primer configuration was due to a very minor occurance  where primers had isolated runin with a very wide meplat hardcast bullets.  The problem occures due to the way Marling has the magtube designed (but thats another story.)

I personally don't worry about it.  Statistically speaking,  I'm  5 times more likely to be struck by lightning than getting one tube detination.  

Hope this sets your mind at ease...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
In response,

Indeed it does.  (But I still wear eye protection.)
I appreciate your experience and input.  This forum has proven very valuable while ascending the steep end of the learning curve.  Hats off to the forum developers and moderators.  

Thanks again,

Smith
 
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