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Found this on working on the Ruger trigger for the 77 mk2. Got a friends that pulls about 9 pounds and wanted to see if I could do something about it.

Ruger Model 77 Trigger

by
Michael Donaldson (aka Doc)

Webmasters note: This information is strictly for reference purposes only and is not intended for use by anyone other than a qualified gunsmith. The author, nor the webmaster will be liable for any incidents or accidents that occur through the use of this information. In laymans terms, if you are not a qualified gunsmith DO NOT MESS with your trigger. Leave it to the professionals!

The Ruger 77 trigger is one of the easiest factory triggers to rework. However, alterations to any firearm should be done only by a qualified gunsmith. This information is strictly for reference only and is not intended for use by anyone other than a qualified gunsmith. (guess why I had to put that in?)

Ruger firearms are designed to be strong, reliable, and SAFE. In doing this, they leave you with plenty of material to work with. In the model 77 bolt action rifle there are 2 main areas of complaint, that would be creep and weight. A third area could be considered as trigger over-travel.

Creep equals the distance the trigger must travel before releasing the sear. Weight equals the amount of force required to compress the trigger in order to fire. And over-travel is the distance the trigger travels after releasing the sear. If any of these are out of balance, they will be detrimental to the accuracy of ANY firearm. Ideally, the distance the trigger ‘creeps’ is imperceptible, the weight is light enough so as to not distort one’s hold on the firearm, and over-travel does not exist. With these definitions is becomes apparent that trigger WEIGHTS should vary according to the intended purpose of the firearm. A crisp, 3 pound trigger is as absurd on a bench rest rifle, as a 2oz trigger is on a hunting rifle. Remember safety is always #1. Keep the WEIGHT safe. All triggers should have minimal creep and no over-travel.

To fix the Ruger trigger one must understand its design. ‘Creep’ comes from the amount of trigger/sear engagement. Weight is a combination of trigger angle and spring tension, over-travel comes from the free swing of the trigger after the sear releases.

1. Standard factory trigger/sear engagement is about .035-.045. It equals the depth of the sear notch. This means that the trigger must move that entire distance before releasing the sear. Reducing this distance to .020 will safely reduce the perceptible ‘creep.’

2. The top angle of the trigger is steep enough that you must actually lift the sear in order to release it. Remember, the sear is already under tension from the bolt and firing pin. Increasing this angle to an even 90 degrees allows the trigger to follow a more natural arc and defeat the lifting action. Only enough metal needs to be removed to fully engage the sear, or about .025.

3. Next, a slight 45 degree bevel on the lead angle of the trigger will drastically increase the crispness of the trigger. Do only enough so as to extend perpendicularly forward about .005. This will actually help the sear to release, it is done on many custom 1911 triggers. With a .020 sear notch and the trigger done in this manner, you will still have a full .015 engagement of the trigger to the sear.

4. Polish all parts and bearing surfaces.

5. There are two solutions to the over-travel problem. (1) You can drill a hole in the front top end of the trigger for a small set screw and adjust accordingly. (2) You can drill a hole through the back of the trigger guard. The one in the trigger itself is theoretically better because it is supported against the action itself. Whereas the trigger guard screw is actually a third piece of connected metal. I have personally found no difference accept the trigger guard is easier to do and easier to set.

6. If the trigger and sear are wobbly because of the pins, simply purchase a couple of drill bits slightly larger that the existing holes, re-drill, cut off the bits and use them as pins. This is a key element when making the triggers extremely light.

7. I personally prefer the single stage triggers to the 2 stage trigger because my triggers are lighter than the 1st stage. You can actually pin the 2 sections if you like, just replace the connector spring with a pin. After you have done one, you will understand the principles, and should have no problem figuring the 2 stage. New springs are usually necessary in order to get very light triggers.

Some weights that I would recommend for intended uses would be 2-16oz (less than 1 pound) for a BENCH gun. Start heavier so that as you progress you can still feel the trigger. The ‘average’ hunter may not even realize they have touched a 2oz bench trigger. These rifles are ONLY chambered when aimed at the target, hence, they are not real conducive to hunting conditions. 16-40oz (1-2&1/2 pounds) on the average VARMINT gun. Most varmint hunting is done off of some form of rest where firearm is stabilized in a safe direction. Finally, the average hunting rig should be at least 2&1/2 pounds plus. These are just my suggestions and opinions.

GOOD LUCK and BE SAFE
 

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I have a MKII 300 Win Mag with a stiff trigger. Do not have an acctual calibrated weight scale. I just used a fish scale i have and my pull was unofficialy 5.5 lbs from the factory. All i did was take out the spring and replace it with a shortened spring out of a ball point pen, resulting in around 2.5 lbs pull weight. Easy(cheap) solution to try and see how it feels.
 

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I bought my brother and I a matched pair of Ruger M77 Varmint/Target Rifles in .22-250 this weekend.

We adjusted the triggers to the limits that the adjustment allows, but the two stage trigger just doesn't satisfy us.

I spent some internet time this weekend researching this topic and I uncovered that the Timney Adjustable Triggers that seem to be popular are specifically NOT for the Varmint/Target version.

I did find a "Rifle Basix" option. And, I guess what I'm looking for is an opinion on replacement trigger options for the Varmint/Target version and a comment or two on the Rifle Basix option specifically.

Thanks so much!
 

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Anytime I pick up a 77 MkII I install a Rifle Basix trigger. I have never been able to do much with the stock Ruger trigger. Rifle Basix triggers are truly a drop in option and I have found the people there to be extremely helpful. All of my Rifle Basix triggers have a pull using a RCBS tirgger scale of 2.75 to 3.0 pounds and have a good crisp feel. Here the Sportsmen's Warehouse has them in stock and most mail order houses carry them.
 

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Dean Fay said:
Anytime I pick up a 77 MkII I install a Rifle Basix trigger. I have never been able to do much with the stock Ruger trigger. Rifle Basix triggers are truly a drop in option and I have found the people there to be extremely helpful. All of my Rifle Basix triggers have a pull using a RCBS tirgger scale of 2.75 to 3.0 pounds and have a good crisp feel. Here the Sportsmen's Warehouse has them in stock and most mail order houses carry them.
I bought two of the Rifle Basix triggers and they have made a world of difference!
 

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You can 'shim' the trigger on Ruger's target model. . .Look closely and you'll see where to apply the shimwork. You can use plastic, brass or steel, the choice is yours.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The Ruger target trigger is one that I've not worked on so I really can't apply the above trigger smoothing article to it. I do have to say that from a gunsmith point of view I've never felt that shimming was a good idea compared to actually stoning to change sear angles and the amount of sear contact.

I do like the aftermarket triggers for the Ruger MK II's as it does give you the option of trigger adjustments compared to the factory trigger. I've tried the new Ruger trigger and it is better than the old one, but still not adjustable.

Along with that Ruger has paid me enough for replacing their non-adjustable trigger to buy several nice rifles. Go Ruger.
 

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The Ruger Target triggers components have some interesting features that, upon close inspection, enable one to see that shimming works well within its design...not to put your opinion down. I've had two of their models, and Bill did a good job designing this system.

If it wasn't for the weight of Ruger's target model, I'd be loving one right this minute. Heck, as it turned out, after glass, bipod, sling and ammo, my sub is gaining more weight than I care to juggle around these days.

Have a good-un
 

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A friend has a Ruger 77 .220 Swift from sometime past. He got it at a gun show in almost new condition. It appeared unfired. I had adjusted some Ruger 77 triggers in the past for myself and friends, so he asked me to do this one. This appeared to be just a standard Ruger 77 with a 24' varmint bbl. , a 77 V. When I started out on his trigger, it just had a lot of creep and was very heavy.

After getting the over travel gone and backing out the return spring tension, there was still all that creep. I then started reducing sear engagement, or so I thought. No response from turning that allen screw. Hmmmm....

What Ruger had done was to put that screw in as a "plug screw" or a "dummy screw", covering up the access tunnel to the real sear adjustment screw. It wouldn't matter how you turned that screw, there would be no sear adjustment. That screw had to come all the way out. It took an extra long allen wrench to get to that real sear adjustment screw down that long tunnel. But that did finally allow a 2 1/2 lb. trigger pull with no creep and no over travel. It did end up with no problems safety-wise.

Just thought folks might want to know about that little Ruger trick, in case they might encounter that situation.

Rev
 

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I bought my brother and I a matched pair of Ruger M77 Varmint/Target Rifles in .22-250 this weekend.

We adjusted the triggers to the limits that the adjustment allows, but the two stage trigger just doesn't satisfy us.

I spent some internet time this weekend researching this topic and I uncovered that the Timney Adjustable Triggers that seem to be popular are specifically NOT for the Varmint/Target version.

I did find a "Rifle Basix" option. And, I guess what I'm looking for is an opinion on replacement trigger options for the Varmint/Target version and a comment or two on the Rifle Basix option specifically.

Thanks so much!
Not sure which version of the Varmint / Target you have but the first ones made were called VBZ I believe the ones with the Blued reciever and the stainless barrel will accept the Kepplinger single set trigger. I have one in a 22-250 that I love, I purchased a couple of these and installed one and have about a 2&1/2 Lb pull unset and a 1&1/2 to 2 Oz when set. They will not work on the V/T with the stainless reciever but will fit the V/T with the Blued reciever.
 

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I'm fairly certain the older Target versions with the blued receiver and stainless barrel will accept an aftermarket trigger(Rifle Basix) for a standard MK II.
 

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Ruger 77MKII trigger job

i have made all the cuts on the hammer and the sear according to your instructions. I used the series I power jig. I didn't make bigger pins or cut any springs yet and Ime getting a nice 2.75 pull..However there is some grit or a little glitchey feeling getting to a solid trigger that breaks nicely and am wondering if you know how to smooth this out....Ime thinking the area under the sear, where the hammer rests, might need considerable honing..
Ill answer my question: Took out the hammer/sear again and polished the area where the hammer rests on the sear and recut my cuts and polished them again. Perfect trigger at 2.75 where the customer wants it....
 

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Got my Ruger Hawkeye Ultra Light .308 back yesterday with a new adjustable Timney Trigger. WOW!! WHAT A DIFFERENCE!!!! The new trigger has no creep and is very crisp letting off at 3.5 pounds! Raining here today so I'll have to wait to shoot a 100 yard 5-shot group.
 

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Timney does work in mine-Ruger77-223.

Much better trigger in the 2-3 pound range. I cant do those 4+ pounders after shooting benchrest w/ 2 ounce triggers.

I sold a Savage 219 cause of a 6# (or more) trigger. Wish it was adjustable cause it was a nice gun, 22 Hornet.
 

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typo fix

Langenc,
This is thread has been dead for three years now, and dear Bob has passed on some time ago as well.
 

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Just buy an after market trigger
Save yourself some money and just polish the one you have. I did both of my MKII triggers, was very easy and now they are some of my best triggers. I was going to order a Timney but figured I would try to do the trigger work my self, I had nothing to lose, if it didnt work I was going to buy one anyway. I am glad I tried it, between the two rifles I saved over $250.
 
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