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I put a Timney on my Ruger.

Ruger likes to brag that the purchase includes rings valued at $40.. They dont say to be prepared to spend $100 on a trigger.
 

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Overtravel fix Ruger 77 MKII

When I bought my Ruger Gunsight Scout rifle it came with a horrible trigger. The information I found here allowed me to stone and re-spring the trigger correctly. Over travel was still a problem. The local hobby shop had stainless steel shim stock. I bought a .010 1/2"x 12" piece. Cut a 5/16" wide x 2" long strip that fit in the trigger hanger. Bent the top of it to fit in the front of the sear cutout. Dropped it down in front of the trigger into the trigger hanger. Bent the shim stock hanging down out of the hanger forward clamping it into the hanger. Trimmed off the extra length and checked the trigger pull. No perceptible over travel remains.
 

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Safe easy novice trigger jobs.

Something I've done to many guns to shorten the sear engagement is to put some JB weld in front of the trigger engagement point. Instead of permanently shortening the engagement surface, this just stops the trigger short of 'full' engagement. It's easy, reversible, and doesn't require any special tools or talent. If I go too far I simply file away some of the JB weld to get a deeper engagement.

In some cases JB weld can also be used to fix over travel and other things.

As for smoothness, the standard is polishing the engagement surfaces. Some of us don't have the stones to do this, whether we're talking about the tools or the personal stones to start modifying the surfaces. I've found that the right lube can help quite a bit. I've applied molybdenum disulfide paste to several and it does a great job. I recently 'rebuilt' a .22 lever gun and used Hornady Oneshot gun cleaner/lube to flush it out and protect the metal. I didn't expect it, but the trigger was surprisingly light afterwards. I did nothing to modify the trigger, unless I accidentally did something, so I assume it was the Oneshot that did it. Next gun I get into I'm gonna try it to verify, but from some tests I've seen and done myself it's very believable that the Oneshot did it. If I think the surfaces are rough I've put some polishing compound on them and just work the trigger several times to help smooth it.

I get that these aren't the 'right' way of doing things, but they're the right way for this novice as it's safe, easy, and reversible.
 

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I recently pulled out my 1970 M77 in 6mm Remington with the tang safety. I had not shot it in probably 30 years, and although not unhappy with the way it shot some old reloads, the trigger seemed to be a bit heavy. I have seen some talk about "adjusting" this trigger as there is an adjustment screw (small allen head). Can it be safely adjusted?
 
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