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My friend has a Ruger Gold Label that has been repaired by Ruger twice for broken hammers, and once by a ‘smith Ruger contracts with. The hammers break off chips and become non functional, interfering with the extractors. Does anyone know if this is a recurring problem with Rugers?
 

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The Shadow
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The internal floating hammers going goofy, a propensity to launch choke tubes down range, horrid wood-to-metal fit, and general casting plagues.
That is the story of the Gold Label.
They are beautiful, but were a last effort of Bill prior to his death, that the company didn't care to fix after he was gone.

Cheers
 

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The internal floating hammers going goofy, a propensity to launch choke tubes down range, horrid wood-to-metal fit, and general casting plagues.
That is the story of the Gold Label.
They are beautiful, but were a last effort of Bill prior to his death, that the company didn't care to fix after he was gone.

Cheers

All true, but they still bring big bucks and are tough to sell too. Some guys just collect them, so a pretty narrow market does exist. One of Bill's dream projects.
 

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The Shadow
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they still bring big bucks and are tough to sell too. Some guys just collect them, so a pretty narrow market does exist.
The OP's question is about frequency of mechanical problems with this gun, not it's value in the heart of a sentimental collector.
 

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That hammer tail that engages the cocking arm is an example of a part that needs more strength than investment casting can offer. Every internal part can be made from scratch but it would be a big job.
 
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