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Discussion Starter #1
This one is for my use. I checked out the 'sniper' site on the web, but couldn't find instructions for my Ruger Model 77 Mk II. Can someone provide me with instructions, or a website to tell me how to adjust the trigger, and how to take the bolt apart.

Thanks for the help, again.
 

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Beartooth Regular
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The MKII trigger is designed NOT to be adjustable. Timney offers an excellent replacement that is adjustable for weight and overtravel, and it can be installed at home with a good file and some care. You must fit the trigger to the individual gun for the safety to function, but it isn't a difficult task.
As for the bolt, how far apart do you want to take it? I belive instructions are in the manual for unscrewing the cocking piece/ firing pin assembly, which should be all that is necessary for cleaning and degreasing. If these instructions aren't included, please repost and I'll try to help. I've owned a couple of these rifles, but don't have one currently, so I don't have the manual - working from memory, always a dangerous thing... IDShooter
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Many thanks, ID. I'll try the limited disassembly shown in the manual to lubricate the parts, etc. At that time I may find it possible, I'll see, to lighten the firing pin spring.

I'll also try to 'moly' the trigger mechanism since this has been helpful in the past.

Thank you.
 

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I've known guys who improved the trigger a bit by polishing the sear and engagement, and even lightening the return spring. I've felt these triggers, and they are an improvement over the factory for sure, but not in a league with the Timney.
Either way you go, it's got to be an improvement over the factory job.
As for the firing pin spring - I never took mine down that far. The only rifle on which I've ever taken the bolt down that far was a Mauser. Hopefully someone else can help with that!

Good luck and be safe, IDShooter
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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I stayed with the older 77 for this reason - their triggers are adjustable.

When you can find a big aftermarket for triggers on a particular rifle, that ought to tell you something about the factory trigger!

I would advise against lightening the mainspring. First, you may have reliability problems if it doesn't hit the primer hard enough, second you may increase the lock time which isn't good for accuracy, and third, this usually isn't the source of most of the pull weight, anyway. If there is a separate trigger return spring (and most guns to have one, except the Redhawk comes to mind as having only one spring in the action), then that is the spring you want to reduce the weight of.

I've lightened the trigger return springs in a number of revolvers and this generally gets the desired results with a minumum of effort, and doesn't compromise reliability.

As an example, on the Win M70 trigger, the trigger weight is adjustable by two nuts which control how much the trigger return spring is compressed. Doesn't affect sear engagement (creep), overtravel, or how 'crisp' the letoff is, but those are things you want to be very careful with anyway.

Good luck, and check with Brownell's to see if they have just a trigger return spring that you can buy as a replacement. It's been a while since I looked for trigger springs for Ruger 77s so off the top of my head I couldn't tell you.

Oh and Brownell's sells a bolt disassembly tool that you will want also. You can take a bolt apart without one, but it's not fun, and very easy to loose parts or have the mainspring pop you in the eye if you are not careful.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I try to remember safety glasses as soon as I work on/around springs. They may be small but they can pack a wallop to an eyeball!

Thanks, again, for your replies.
 

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I agree with Big Mike, the Timney trigger is the way to go, I have the Ruger MarkII in .338 win mag with the timney trigger, its like night and day compared to the stock trigger. Aim small hit small. RAMbo.
 

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My two cents;

I picked up a Ruger 77 mkII in .270Win a few years back. Was only the second bolt action centerfire I had ever owned. I had been spoiled rotten by a Rem 722 that was adjusted just as I liked it. After one trip to the range with the new Ruger I knew that the trigger wouldn't do. I bought an aftermarket spring set and polished the trigger and sear surfaces. Don't remember the manufacturer of the spring. It wasn't Wolfe although I do believe they also offer one. Seems to me I bought it from Lock, Stock, and Barrel.

Polished the sear and trigger surfaces with a dremel and simichrome mold polish. It was the first time I had tried this, boy was I nervous and careful. Ruger trigger mechanism is incredibly simple, figured worst case I'd be buying another trigger from Ruger. Anyway, it was an easy job.

Trigger was much improved. No, it probably won't compare to what Timney offers but it set me back less than $20. No problems with misfires. In fact I think the kit came with multiple spring weights so that if you had trouble with ignition you could step up to the next higher weight. Yeah it probably increased lock time but in the field I don't think it will matter much. I don't have nearly the skill to be worrying much about a few thousandths of a second (or whatever). This option is inexpensive and might be worth trying before going to a Timney. Just one guy's opinion.
 

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I guess I need to clarify. I'm not really sure where my head was at with that last reply. The spring I installed fits behind the trigger itself. I suppose this is the trigger return spring. I did not replace the mainspring that powers the firing pin. As I understand it, my spring probably wouldn't have an impact on firing pin energy so reliabilty should be unchanged. I am satisfied with my results, especially considering cost vs. improvement. I can't help but think, thought, the polishing I did probably was responsible for more of the improvement than the spring was.

I have seen HEAVIER mainsprings for sale to decrease lock time but I havn't noticed lighter ones out there. Then again, I wasn't really looking for them either.
 

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I would suggest buying one of the aftermarket triggers for the MkII. I happen to like the MkII trigger because once I have it adjusted to my taste, it can't get out of adjustment. This type of trigger must be adjusted by a good gunsmith.

Adjusting a MkII trigger involves first taking the slop out of the system with larger pivot pins and possibly side shims. All contact surfaces are polished and lubed.

Next the sear engagement and angles can be reworked and polished. Surface hardening of the new surfaces may be necessary to prevent premature wear and a safe trigger turning unsafe. Here is where it's very likely someone who doesn't understand the geometery involved will get an unsafe trigger.

Finally, the return spring is clipped or replaced to get the desired pull weight.

For anyone not familiar with this sort of work I strongly suggest one of the aftermarket triggers.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I plan on taking the careful approach to this project since I "hate to get up off my wallet" for repair bills. When I have time I will disassemble the 'piece' to see what is reasonable.

Thank you for the advice.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The website, and it's connection from Jack, were excellent. Now I've got an alternative to a lighter spring. The technique is straight-forward. I am considering doing a care-
ful rework of the parts pictured. I do understand about keeping proper angles, and the problem with removing the hardened, outside surface of these parts...

Many thanks to both of you ...
 

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The suggested webpage looks sound. A couple of things to keep in mind. I don't like a dry trigger- even in match guns it's almost impossible to keep lube out of the trigger. Each time you adjust the engagement surfaces, apply some lube before you test the trigger pull.

It's tremendously easier to remove material than it is to add material. Work slowly and use the old machinist's trick of removing the material halfway to your expected finish point and try the fit. Then remove material halfway to the finish point and try again. By doing this you can sneak up on your final dimensions without going too far.

After you finish, there will be some mating and wear on the parts under use. Quit just a bit short of the pull you want and work the parts for awhile. Again, you can always go back and remove more material.

I honestly don't know what kind of hardening Ruger is currently using on their components so I don't know that re-hardening the surfaces will even be necessary.

As an alternative to adjustable overtravel screws, I prefer (on hunting weapons) to weld up a stud and file to fit or drill a blind hole for a pin that can be filed to fit.

It might pay to have spare parts on hand just in case.
 
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