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Discussion Starter #1
I'm thinking very hard about a stainless No 1B in 30-06.  The only smithing I expect to do is to have the trigger worked on a little bit to lower the weight of pull down to say, 3 to 3.5 lbs.  I will put a leupold vari-X III on it in all liklihood.  Using Federal match (alas, I don't reload, yet), what kind of accuracy do you think I can realistically expect from the rifle?

Thank you.

Troy
 

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Troy,

I love the #1 and am in good company.  It has some quirks, however.  My out-of-the-box #1B in .220 Swift shoots 3/8" to 1/2" (bench, 100 yards), but only if I feed it what it likes.  For example, it tends to prefer flat-based, plastic tipped bullets, and it likes them fast.  I have quite a collection of partial boxes of bullets resultant from load development.  It was all trial and error, with a lot of error.  Prepare yourself for the possibility that it may not like the match ammo.  I shot my .308 almost exclusively with Federal GM match for years until I got a wild hair and started serious load development with other bullets...and I cut my groups in half.  Federal match is great ammo, no doubt about it, but the gun has the final word.  Decide on the purpose of the ammo, (hunting, paper punching, etc.), and experiment with the appropriate weight and styles of bullets in that category.  In .30-06 there are a lot of options in factory ammo.

Just a note:  Many people have improved their groups out of the #1 by addressing the inherent problem of the forend hanger.  There are several good articles out there, several of which I have on file. I would be happy to send you what I have on that subject.  

Also:  My #1s tend to string the shots as the barrel heats up, and they absolutely do not like being shot off of a sandbag or hard rest.

Hope this helps...

Cordially,

Smith
 

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I currently have 2 No. 1's and in other time had a third.  The two I have are No. 1 S in 338 Win Mag, and a No. 1 RSI in 7x57 Mauser.  The 338 was made around 1985, I think Wilson was still making Ruger barrels then, but right out of the box, the rifle would shoot better than I could shoot it.  It's no problem getting MOA from that rifle, as long as I do my part.  It is relatively picky about what it likes though.  It doesn't seem to like Nosler Partitions at all, but loves the 230 gr Win Fail Safes.  It does shoot the 225 and 230 grain bullets of all flavors very well.

The RSI is picky also, I haven't come up with a load yet that gives as good of accuracy as Hornady's Light Magnums.  I did have the 338's trigger lightened and smoothed.  The RSI is still fairly new and I'm still working with it.  It's kinda cold here now to be spending a lot of time at the shooting bench and my range is in an avalanche zone, so I haven't shot in awhile.

The one I got rid of was a No. 1 B in 270 Wby Mag.  It shot extremely well, and had a great trigger right out of the box.  I didn't like the beavertail forearm though and a No.1 just doesn't look right to me if it doesn't have sights on it.  The 270 Wby is a very destructive round, especially if bone is encountered.  It would be a shame to load down a Wby Mag, kinda like keeping a Ferrari in first gear.  I like the 7mm Mauser better.

Having said all that, I have read that some folks have had problems with No. 1's accuracy.  You sure couldn't make that arguement with the rifles I've been fortunate enough to shoot.  I'm not sure about the stainless, all mine are blue steel and walnut.

I've read quite a few of the accurizing tips and tricks used on the No. 1, as a matter of fact that's how I came across this here website.  None sound too tough to do.  But, like I said, my rifles seem to shoot better than I can shoot them, especially after climbing 6,000 feet in the rarified air of the Chugach or Wrangell Mountains.  One of the strong points for me is the way the rifle handles and the No. 1's are short and well balanced, they come up to your shoulder in a fluid grace and I don't have dig my face into the stock or raise it up off the stock to hunt for my scope.  The rifle snaps to my shoulder and I'm looking right through the scope automatically.
 

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Oh yeah,
Did I say that I really really like the No. 1's?  I do.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you both.

I probably should have added a little info.  My intended purpose is hunting; deer and elk primarily.  And no, I wouldn't be hunting with federal match.  I just cited it because it seems to be, on average, one of the best factory cartridges out there.  I figure that a quality rifle with an MSRP of over $800, assuming it likes a particular brand of ammo, should be able to shoot around 1 MOA with it after a good trigger job.  This is not necessarily needed for hunting at responsible ranges I realize, but I guess I'd like to get an idea of what I can expect from the rifle in it's stock condition with good quality factory ammo.  Sort of a baseline if you will.

Smith, I have seen a few articles about the forend hanger on the No 1.  I appreciate your offer through, thank you. The symptoms you mention seem to be the two most often cited by No 1 owners.  For around the same amount of money a know a local chap who would build me a rifle that will shoot 1 MOA with match ammo (my boss has three of his rifles).  I like the No 1 action much better, but the aforementioned quirks have made me somewhat afraid of it...
 

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Troy,
    I'll add my tiny bit of experience here if you don't mind. The No 1 I dealt with was my dad's varmint model in 22-250. Had it a few years ago (18?). I was never able to get varmint accuracy out of that rifle. 1.5 to 2" groups were the best we could get from it from the bench. I didn't know anything about the fore end adjustments back then, and we never messed with the bench set up much, just tried different ammo. Perhaps now we could do better. But the rifle has been sold years ago.
    It also had some quirks. For example, it would not always extract a fired round. The extractor would pop over the rim of the cartridge, leaving it in the chamber. And, when I carried the rifle in the field hunting woodchucks, the lever would catch in my jeans pocket and pop open, dropping a chambered round on the ground. And last, we had trouble getting proper eye relief with the scopes we had at the time because the rings sit so far forward and close together.
     All these problems could have been overcome more than likely. But it really didn't seem worth it so my dad sold it. I don't mean to say you shouldn't get one - they are beautiful rifles and have potential, certainly! But I just wanted to make you aware of our experiences before you buy.
One last thing - most models are heavy, 8 lbs and up without a scope. I don't know where you hunt, but these days I wouldn't want to carry around that much rifle in these Idaho mountains!     ID
 

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One thing about the No.1's is that they do not like a hard rest.  If you cushion the rest with a loosely rolled up sweater, towel, or even your hand, it seems they settle down a bit.
 

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i haven't had a bad #1 yet! based on the few i've owned i would tend to expect a new #1 to shoot at or near moa right out of the box. my #1h in .375 h&h isn't picky about ammo, it averages 3/4" for 3 shots at 100 yards with 81.0 grs imr4350 (not sure if this load is safe with newer batches of 4350 though), w-w brass, federal magnum primer, and any of several 300 grain bullets...had another #1 in .375 h&h which was almost as accurate, a #1s in .338 which tended to do 1" or better, and a .45-70 #1s that did about 3/4" to 1" with i forgot what load. somebody who can actually shoot well could probably do better with my rifles. incidentally on the ones i've owned, the triggers were generally ok ot of the box but were around 4 lbs pull...exception was the .45-70 which did need some work.
 

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I agree with you 100% rgp.  My next rifle will probably be a No. 1.  That No.1 H in 416 Rigby is calling my name!!!  The only way the next rifle isn't a No. 1 for me is if a really nice Sharps (C Sharps or Shiloh) becomes available for less than a gazillion dollars.
 

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I took a new 30-06 #1A to the range yesterday.

Load: Sierra 168gr matchkings in Fed cases, CCI 200 primer and 57gr of IMR4831.  Carefully loaded, but I haven't worked the charge weights around -- only using recommended 57gr.

I was very pleased with the 2" and 3" 3-shot groups at 200yds.  I'm using a fixed 4x Burris compact; I don't think I can shoot better than that at that range.  @100yards, I got a 3 sub 1 inch groups (3 shots) -- one at 3/4" -- and a couple at 1" and 11/4".

I tried 5-shot groups too and they added an inch at 200yds, but heck it's a hunting rifle and I don't plan on taking 5 shots at anything, anyway.

I've added the Moyer's trigger and loosened the forend screw to "just snug".  If it stays this accurate (consistently), I won't muck with it anymore.
 

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Charlie,
I think those results are pretty typical these days with the No. 1's.  Somehow, somewhere down the line they got some bad press.  For whatever it was, I just don't think it is deserved today.  I think they are as good right out of the box and the M77, Rem 700, Win 70, etc...  Another point, these rifles to have a fairly high MSRP, I think around 818, but you find them 150 less than that brand new all day long.
 

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ditto...the bad press probably came from some idiot who wanted Ruger to pay him extra for a good product review. The last and only "bad" #1 I ever saw with my own two eyes was a #1B in .220 Swift, and I don't think that rifle was actually defective in any way because the owner was the type to expect 1/2" or better at 100 yards out of any varmint cartridge and was thus disappointed with most rifles...every #1 I've owned or shot has done moa or better, and how much more accuracy can somebody realistically expect than to be able to regularly hit soda cans at 300 yards with a .375 H&H?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Gentleman,

Thank you all for replying to my post.  I appears I will get one in all liklihood.
 

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Troy,
Let us know if you do and what the results are.  I'm sure you will be pleased.
 

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I have been shooting #1s for about 30 years and have 3 '06s in my experience; two of them are 1Bs.  They were very different.  The first achieved 1" groups with several loads, including my favorate of a Speer GS with 57 grains IMR 4350 CCI 200 primer.  The bullet needed to be seated near the lands, but would shoot under 1" with 5 shots.  I rebedded the forearm with Accuglas for the last 1 1/2" of the forearm and adjusted the tension with the glass against the hanger.  It took some work, but showed good results.

The other would not shoot under 2" for 5 shots with any load I tried, so I eventually had it rebarrelled to a .280 Rem.  I had rebed the forearm; tried seating bullets at various lengths; etc, but nothing showed an improvement.

The 3rd is a 1A that is owned by my elder son.  It shoots 1" with no modification with a thrown-together load of 56 gr of IMR 4350 and Hornday 180s.  All of the rifles had a decent 3# - 3 1/2# pull on the trigger out of box.

I believe that you will find the rifle to be finicky, but will shoot well with what it likes.  If not, try the forearm.  It seems to be the single problem (?) on the gun.

All in all, I am a No. 1 fan, as I own about 10 of them and have my sons shooting them.  Hope yours shoots like a "house-a-fire."

dclark
 

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While I never have been a big Ruger fan, I have two Number 1s in my permanent collection- one, an International in 7 x 57 that is a wonderful handling little rifle suited for any game on the planet that doesn't eat people; the other a very rare S model in .38-55 WCF. The 7mm shoots 1" groups regularly with handloads and the 38-55 is a joy to shoot with cast bullets. I can also use the more potent .375 Win for deer and bear hunting in this rifle. Ruger took a huge leap in price on this model in the last year or so. Two years ago I retailed them for about $550, now I can't buy them wholesale for that! The one thing I always wanted to see offered on the #1 was some tasteful engraving on that blank receiver panel. They did roll-stamp a few with a somewhat tacky pattern last year but not quite worthy of the price. All in all, a wonderful firearm and I can certainly recommend it.
 

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Charlie Z,

How was it installing the new trigger?  I have contemplated adding one to my varmint model in 22-250.  It shoots great, but the trigger is a little heavy and sometimes feels like the pull is inconsistent.  If it is a drop in install, it seams like a done deal for the price.  

5 Shot
 

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Indeed!......This has been an excellent run and has covered the No1 quite well. Let's address the vertical stringing. As with all single shots and double rifles.....The No1 does not like a hard rest on the forearm (as the man said)...there is more trouble from this than the forearm hanger. Before you begin the various treatment, can I suggest something. Cut a small hardwood wedge and drive it between the hanger and the barrel...shoot a few groups. If this solves the problem, you might want to consider the method of a set screw between the hanger and barrel. If there was no improvement, you may want to consider glass bedding the rear of the forearm and hanger, and floating the barrel.Thereason I suggest this course, is I know of quite a few No1's that still have the little hardwood wedge in them after years of shooting...not fancy, but works!
I think we have some tech notes on glassing the forearm.
Best Regards, James
 

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The trigger change was a little more involved than expected, but if you're patient and study what you have to do, it's no problem.  

To get at the trigger assem. you have to pull the buttpad, then buttstock.  The trigger guard assem. drops out with 2 pins.  

The only tricky bit was the toggle bar from the trigger to the sear connected by a couple of press fit pins.  They are *directional* -- they have a head.  (If your tap on it doesn't release the pin, you're probably tapping the wrong side.  Do not hit harder&#33<!--emo&;)--><img src="http://beartoothbullets.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif" border="0" valign="absmiddle" alt=';)'><!--endemo-->

The Moyer trigger adds a sear release adjustment that, apparently, existed on early #1s.  This gets adjusted only when the stock is off, so get it right.  Trim a couple of loops off the trigger return spring to lighten up the pull, while you're in there.  

You can adjust the overtravel and trigger pull screws anytime, as they are in the face of the trigger.

Bounce the butt on the floor cocked (not loaded) afterward to make sure the trigger is predictably safe.  

Charlie
 

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Well, there's got to be someone throw a fly in the ointment. I had one of the first 22-250 #1's that probably got sold in B.C. A buddy bought one of the first 270 Alex Henry styles a short time later. As received each rifle would walk 5 shots vertically off the target at about 2 " intervals. It didn't matter if it was a soft rest, hard rest , held in the hand or shot with the forearm removed and only the action held in the hand. I glass bedded, relieved , varied forend screw tension to no avail. I concluded that the barrels which had very minimal clearance betwen the forend hanger were "springboarding" for lack of a better term. What finally cured them was a spacer or shim cut from brass dogs and literally driven between the barrel and hanger with a narrow piece of steel to firm up the relationship of forend hanger and barrel. Forends were glassed to the hanger and relieved from the receiver and floated from the barrel. Following this both rifles shot 1/2 or smaller with good handloads and were no longer fussy about how they were held or what they were held on. Can you imagine tolerating a hunting rifle that will only shoot well when held by 3 fingers rested on a foam pad on top of a waterbed? Not this cowboy! So it was interesting seeing the comment about the hardwood shim as I think I first detailed my "cure" on shooters about 15 years ago.
On the other hand the #1's I have seen shot since then have not exhibited this problem to anywhere near the same extent and most appear to be reasonably good shooters out of the box. None the less guys still like the set screw pressure point installed to tweak it a bit. I haven't a clue what changes Ruger may have made over the years but at the time I was fooling with them I contemplated having the barrel reduced by about .010 at the back to see if that made a difference. Never did it so can't report squat on that idea. No matter how you solve the problem it can be fun getting there.
besto.
 
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