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Discussion Starter #1
I read through a ton of old posts and have to say I am amazed at the knowledge contained in this site.

Now that you are all smiling, I am looking for a revolver in 44 magnum.  I figure ruger is good as I have some of their revolvers and have enjoyed them.  I am leaning towards stainles steel and probably single action.

After reading way too many posts I found one or two that said the double action redhawk was stronger than the blackhawk design, without going into specifics.  From what I understand the cylinder should be the biggest problem area.  

I do not currently reload, but that is something that will change this year.  I have a lever action marlin, so I have already started accumalating brass.

Is there a noticable difference between the strength of the double action and the single action?  And if so, what does it take to notice this difference?

The gun will be in 44 magnum as I just want one to match my marlin.  I know in some of the more stout cartridges you could run into problems, but will the 44 magnum prove to be a problem?
 

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Good chance to exchange some info since I have a SBH 44 and I am getting a 1894 Marlin out of layaway soon.

I think the strength issue will not come into play. They are both strong revolvers. What you want it for is the issue. If you shoot double action and are used to it and you don't want to learn a different feel then stay with the redhawk. If you want something light to carry and do like single actions go with the 5 1/2 inch Blackhawk. If you are going to scope it go with a model that is ready for that ie. scope mount ready. I think the Hunter series is back in the Blackhawk and the Redhawk is ready.

I think the issue if you hunt is always the same. Carry ability and hunting load accuracy. At the range trying to shoot little groups with a handgun at extended ranges why not go with one of the single shot specialty guns.

A gun is a tool. Get the one that suits the type of shooting you do. This will see that your gun is the one you reach for when you go shoot and not the one that stays in the closet, lonely and unused.

Now, I have a question. I've been reading a lot about feed problems with the 1894 Marlin. Have you experienced any with the loads that it should chamber easily or not? Also while we are at it have you changed your sights and if so what?
 

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My marlin has been pretty good from the get go.  It starts out a little rough if brand new.  But I noticed a big difference by 50 rounds.  And at around 200 its action was pretty good.   I do not take stuff apart unless there is a major problem.  I figure by 1000 rounds the action should work great.

I guess I should clarify.  The action will feed fine.  But you work it hard.  Some people like to real gently work a lever action, or my favorite, watch every thing move while working it.  Doing this I can get the 44 magnum bullet to roll around enough to cause a jam.  But if I hold the gun sideways or anyway I can and work the action fast, it does not have a problem.
I am happiest with wad cutters for shooting, mostly target practice at a good back stop at home.  Some light weight hollow points must really get moving cause they seem to explode on impact without doing much penetration.  I thought I had a problem the first round and after research figured it was a round suited for a short barrel revolver.

I do not handload and have bought all different weights and what not that I could.  I had some the shop said were about the heaviest he had seen for a factory load, but I forget what they were.  Those were a nice push for recoil.

The sites are factory.  I considered changing them before even shooting the gun, but they work alright.  I really do not shoot long ranges, so the distance adjustment got set where I am comfortable with it, around 30-40 yards I think.  The sites while tacky work well for me.  If I have a problem with them loosening or anything I will certainly change em.  But for now I prefer to buy ammo and other firearms.

The revolver will be for plinking and general enjoyment.  I might use it hunting or who knows what.  But basically I just want it.

My first marlin lever action was a used 22 with a scope someone else mounted.  I think it is a 39 or 39A or something.  Its action is seriously sweet.  No real effort needed to open and close it.  And if you want to see how fast you can unload it and stay on target it is still fast.

The 44 just takes a bit more effort.  I have read where you should expect it to take some effort, and they should be worked like you mean it.  But the 22 amazed me, but it was used.  And the 44 is improving every box of rounds, so I do believe you will be happy with yours.

I plan to have mine till I die.  It will not be getting traded for anything else, and I like marlins due to the ease of cleaning.
 

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Either one is great, just depends on which one works better for you.  I have 3 DA Rugers (1 44, 1 480, 1 being converted to .500) and a Bisley, and for me the DA grip frames work better for my hand.  As far as strength goes, the Redhawks are a little more massive in the cylinder and frame, but either one is about as fragile as an anvil.  Both are capable of being quite accurate if Ruger did things right at the factory.
Mark
 

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biere,

I have a Stainless Super BlackHawk. I love that gun!!

If you plan on shooting cast bullets through it, (when you get set up to reload). I would recommend that you slug the barrel. You will be amazed at the constriction at the threaded shank of the barrel/frame. It is definately noticeable when you push the slug down.

I would plan on a firelapping project, and then the gun would be perfect!!! I'm getting ready to firelap mine. the only other things I did to mine was add a Belt Mtn. basepin, a set of Trapper springs, and made new grips for it.

I only did that so the gun was uniquely "mine". I really didn't have to do anything with it as it was perfectly servicable out of the box.

Hope this helps,

Ray C.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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You won't wear out a Super Blackhawk or Redhawk (or Super Redhawk) with any sane .44 loads.

Pick whichever feels the best in your hands and whichever sights, barrel length, etc., suit your fancy.

I favor the single action for hunting as they are a little lighter, but that's just personal perference.  
 

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If you enjoy reloading and start experimenting with cast bullets in your 44, the Super Redhawk has a longer cylinder, which is more forgiving for longer bullets.  And, it is true, the Redhawk and Super Redhawk are built stronger than the origional blackhawk, but don't let that deceive you.  The Blackhawk and Super Blackhawk are plenty strong and are built to withstand 44 Magnum and hot loaded 45 Long Colt loads.

The only advantage you will enjoy with the Double action (mainly in the Super Redhawk) is the additional weight, cushioned grip and if you get the 9.5" big boy, the longer barrel, which you may or may not like.

I still think the Single Actioned Rugers are stronger than anything else made in 44 caliber out there with exception to the Super Redhawk, so you needn't loose any sleep over your decision.

I chose the Ruger Double action first and really like it.  I also have my eye on a Super Blackhawk Hunter that looks like a really great gun.  And, if you're like all the rest of us, I'm sure you will have one of each one day soon.

Good luck in your decision, and enjoy your pistol.

Kid
 

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Ya can't go wrong with either choice.I have a SBH that just turned 23.It has been fed a regular diet of stuff that would make Elmer proud..Probly 10k rounds or better run thru it without a problem.The only thing I changed was puttin Pachmayr grips on it some years back.I have big hands and the issue grips were uncomfortable to me.
Also have  a SRH as well. Nary a problem there either.
 

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Nawth East Moderatah
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 hello, I too own a ruger in d/a.  I've had that Redhawk 44mag since 1989.  The gun is more than strong enough to take anything you'll feed it.  Ruger has a way of over-engineering all of his firearms.
 Bought mine in 7.5" bbl, blue because that is all it came in at the time.  I bought the Ruger cause I could'nt comfortably shoot the BIG s&w 29 my buddy owned at the time.  Subsequently, he sold the 29 and got the same r'hawk as myself.  The trigger has just gotten better with age,unlike myself.
 I'm currently getting rid of a peacemaker clone(EMF) and plan on replacing it with the Blackhawk convertible in .45colt.... But if your set on .44 you won't go wrong with either sa or d/a.>>>>>>>>>>                              RUGER BUILDS  S T R O N G  G U N S...
 
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