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Just a short story I have for people. I bought a Ruger RSM in .416 Rigby, a nice rifle, but the rifle would not feed. The only modification that I did was to add a nicer forend tip and a better recoil pad.
I called Ruger to ask what I should do and this is what happened: First of all the "tech" asked if I was using and after-market magazine (!?) I didn't even know such a thing existed. I finally talked to a "supervisor" and when she found out that I had added the forend tip and the recoil pad she said that that was probably the problem. She then told me that the first thing they would do was to replace the stock (approx. $500) and then go from there! She informed me that, "Any firearm that has been altered from its condition when it left the factory has to be put back to factory specs before we will work on it."
I was thoroughly amazed. I guess that would mean that if you had a gun reblued, pad added, sling swivels added, refinish of the stock, etc. that Ruger would no longer cover any repairs on that firearm until they "undid" everything you had done to that firearm, and charge you for it.
Anyway I would appriciate any comments anyone has and maybe give warning to others about dealing with Ruger.
 

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Beartooth Regular
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congomike,
     Yeah, I'm a little out of sorts with Ruger right now. My revolver is currently in their shop. I'm awaiting the result. When I talked with them on the phone they were very non-commital about the problem I was having (see the GP-100 thread) .
      Some people have said "great service", some have said that Ruger simply returned their gun with a note that everything was within specs. And I have heard the part about returning altered guns to factory specs at the customer's expense too. I have a Ruger .257 Roberts that I have had feeding problems with but I didn't return it because I had free-floated and glass-bedded the stock and I knew they would "sell" me a new stock.
      I have just about had it with new guns, period. If I expand my collection any further I believe I'll stick with used stuff and look for a good deal, because you are basically stuck with whatever you buy unless you leave it just as it came out of the box. And I have not seen very many new guns that were shootable out of the box. I may be picky, but there you go!     IDSHooter
 

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no excuse at all for a weapon that won't feed properly out of the box. i've only had to send something back to ruger once...i did get good results & fast turnaround but the people i spoke to on the phone were morons. problem was a cylinder on a single six scraping the rear of the barrel, and the "tech" i spoke to told me not to send it in but to take a file and scrape metal off the rear of the barrel. also i strongly suspect the "tech" you spoke to isn't particularly aware of the product line. i would just put the old foreend tip back on temporarily if possible, or if necessary not mention that it was altered, not worry about the pad, and send it to ruger with a letter stating exactly what you want done, their gunsmith (a real one and not the idiot who answered the phone) will usually do exactly as you ask with good results.
 

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Guys, support techs are the lowest caste in the company, so you're not going to find too many sharp knives in that drawer. (Or Old Schmidt, the Swiss 40 year master gunsmith.)

Most of the calls to these manufacturers are something like, "Why can't I shoot dad's 30-30 cartridges in my new M77?".  You can imagine how many home gunsmith Dremel-ground feedramps and sanded magazine followers these guys must see...  Ruger just says, "you void the warranty if you change it."  It's a policy that cuts a wide swath in order to keep returns manageable and simple. Ruger has done well in a tough market because he watches costs and gives a solid product.

It's also too bad you didn't check the function of the gun out before investing your time and effort in adding the pad and forend.  How does it shoot?
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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I have answered tech support emails for a living and you would be just astonished at the stupid things that people ask - so.... companies tend to staff the first couple of levels of tech support with the cheapest help they can find.

Having said that, whoever you talked to was a COMPLETE moron.  They are just going through a list of prepared questions, without any idea what they are talking about.  Too bad the supervisor was a dolt - when this happens, ALWAYS ask to see the next person up the line.  The company may not be aware of what an idiot they have on their hands.  Tech support people are generally measured by how fast they clear the phone lines so if you never called back, they can tell their supervisors that the call was a 'success' and who would ever know?

OK.... enough complaining.  Practical advice:  When you send it back to Ruger, just send the barreled action.  There is no need to send the stock, scope, or anything else.  If it is a feeding problem they don't need the stock to solve it - they have plenty of stocks!  Be sure to tell them that you DON'T want another stock.

I can't believe that someone would be in the firearms industry and have so little idea about how guns work.... unbelievable.

When you send it in mention the ridiculous advise you got, include names if possible, and ask what they are doing to educate their tech support staff....
 

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I'm off topic here, sorry folks I was just thinking it's nice to be on a board where no one is getting paid to write magazine features. A guy can speak his mind here without getting bombarded by attitude "corrections". Back to the topic... I've had many, many problems getting defective guns repaired by Rugers revolver factory. My one encounter with the semi-auto factory in Arizona was quite pleasant in contrast.
 
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