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Discussion Starter #1
MY several year old 629 developed a occasional misfire at approx. round 800. All loads were by the book maximum hand loads. Originally I thought it was something I was doing, but at round 900 multiple misfires were occurring. Getting worse, I threw in the towel after 950 and sent it back to S&W and they repaired it at no cost, a new recoil shield I believe. Although good as new, the frame had stretched causing light strikes. My round count is exact because I had purchased a box of primers when I got the gun and all rounds were my reloads and I fire 50 rounds each range visit.

Clearly the 629 was designed to handle less than 1000 magnum rounds before needing repairs. I haven't read anything about this so was wondering if anybody else has had this experience? Maybe 1000 rounds is more than they expect from a typical user?
 

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I owned two of them and they each had multiple thousands of rounds fired through them and were as good as new when I got rid of them. I'm sure the first one had somewhere near seven or eight thousand rounds through it with no problems.
 

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Im a long time 29 user. The one i have now was well used by the previous owner and came with some very steamy loads. I generally use tamed down reloads. It has a round count considerably more than yours with no issues. Also have a near new 629 with less than 500 rounds through it. I'll be watching it since being informed of your problems.
 

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My family has three model 29, pinned, S and W revolvers. The oldest was likely built in the late 1950s the newest in about 1976. The first and oldest one was bought used so I don't know what happen to it before we got it. It was bought in the earlier 1960s. These guns have shot many, many rounds, mostly loaded with 2400 powder from 18 to 22 grains. Non of these guns have ever given us any problems. They are accurate, powerful and fun to shoot.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I understand the skepticism. I originally thought I was doing something wrong, but I am experienced (25+ years) and all my loads were assembled in small batches at different times and individually weighed for target accuracy. There were no signs of excess pressure, flattened primers, unusual recoil, extraction problems and accuracy was very good. I have loaded somewhere between 15,000 to 20,000 rounds of all kinds and never deliberately hot rod any load including several thousand 357 max loads in a S&W K frame with no trouble. I have made occasional reloading errors but not a 1000 in a row. Since S&W repaired it and sent it back under their warranty program, they obviously have a fix procedure and it is not a safety issue. Maybe frame stretch is not the correct explanation but it required repair.
 

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Swarfer, what exactly is the load you are using in your 629?
 

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S&w 629

I sold mine because I seen they had a few problems with heavy reloads and bought a Contender G2 44Cal. If you do some research on the 629s the older ones are the ones that have the most problems. If you have a 629-S that is not pre drilled for scope rings the frame is a little lighter. The 629s with pre-drilled holes for a scope base are a little more beefier. The only thing you can do is back off your loads a little to get more life out of your 629-S. I like the Contender G-2 because you will brake down before the Contender will. Its got a little more kick but you can load heavy for the Hand Cannon.
 

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Swarfer-- I think the firing pin bushing in the recoil shield set back in the frame so that it blocked full motion of the firing pin. Instead of the 'frame' stretching, it's the threads in the frame. It takes very little variation from perfect on either set of threads for the shield to set back. Good on S&W for repairing it.
 

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In 1989 S&W made several modifications to strengthen their N-frame 44 mags. If yours is older than that, it definitely will not take as many full house loads as the newer ones. Still, many shooters have fired many more than 1,000 rounds through the older ones without any negative effects. If JBelk's supposition isn't correct, could be yours just got a less than ideal heat treat. It happens with mass production items.
 
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