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Alright! Here is one question I have never seen asked or answered. Maybe it is just too obvious. Unfortunately my feeble little mind just can't see what the answer is.

The question is, what purpose does a saddle ring on a carbine serve and how is it used?
 

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It's used to secure the carbine to the horse/saddle when riding. A leather thong is passed through the ring and tied. I'm not sure whether or not the carbine is in a scabbard while the ring is in use. Someone else will chime in shortly.
 

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Kanuck,

I'm not too sure if the carbine ring on a sporting gun is usually put to any practical use, and since they are generally not available except on replica guns used for CAS I feel safe in this belief.

They come from the carbine ring which was common to most weapons used by Dragoons (the US Army didn't use the term Cavalry until the Civil War). The Dragoon wore what was called a Carbine sling which was a wide leather band which went over the left shoulder and hung down the right side. The sling had a large snap which snapped into the carbine ring and was what supported the carbine while the trooper was mounted. To keep the gun from flopping around, the barrel went through a leather ring called a Carbine Boot which was mounted on the saddle rigging. This Boot was merely a tube, open at both ends usually, which only controlled the gun but didn't support it. As the trooper rose in the saddle to dismount the carbine would pull free from the boot and he didn't need to take any particular mind of his weapon as it was attached to him, not the horse.

If you think about this a few moments you will probably realize that this method of carrying the Carbine when mounted was what really brought about the so-called "Cavalry Draw" or reversed strong-side holster. If the pistol holster had been in the usual butt-to-rear position the carbine would have been constantly beating against the revolver!

The "saddle ring" certainly could be used to secure the gun as to make loss less likely, and this would certainly be in a scabbard. My belief is, however, that just as we in these days have a certain affinity for things military, that people thought in those days when the saddle ring was common that it was more because military carbines had this feature and the consumers just wanted it. Sound familiar? Just like many products we have, gunny and others, if it sells that way the manufacturers will build it, even if it doesn'r really make much sense.
 

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Saddle rings were indeed used to secure carbines in saddle scabbards. I'm not sure exactly how they were tied though.

Saddle rings are historicly correct on Winchester carbines. I had a 1906 vintage 94 with a saddle ring on it. And I have seen other Winchesters such as the 92's, and 73's with saddle rings. The clones having saddle rings really have little to do with CAS, they are just historicly correct reproductions.
And not all clones have them. My Rossi Puma carbine does not have one. :(
They were just not common after the turn of the century. Something about less people riding horses I guess.
I think Henry Ford had something to do with it.

I like the look of a saddle ring, but it's not correct for all vintages of carbines.
 

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Winchester called them "sling rings", especially during the earlier years. They referred to their saddle guns as "carbines". The term "saddle ring carbine" came about much later. I am not sure how the sling was attached to the gun, though. It would seem that the use of a hook on the saddle would cause excessive and unusual wear to the frame and stock when the gun was hung by it's ring. What say you guys?
 

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There is another use for the saddle ring. It still amazes me on how much thought the engineers put into their designs. :D

If you carry the Winchester 94 SRC with cross-bolt safety in the "Fire" position in a saddle scabbard it will not accidentally be put in the "Safe" position. The saddle ring prevents the side of the scabbard from rubbing against the safety. You can leave it in the 'Fire" mode. Therefore you will not miss your shot when you pull it from the scabbard.

I have heard that the safety engages on some Marlins with the cross bolt safety in this manner. Maybe this has happened to some Winchesters?
 

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Just wanted to put in my 2 bits on the saddle ring on some rifles or carbines.
My dad in the early 70s showed me the proper way to use a saddle ring.............

It does not attach to the saddle..............
If you fell off you have no gun and the idea is to keep your gun with the rider......

My dad had all the rigging you needed........

First of all the rider puts on a belt over the shoulder......
It is a belt in most ways but has a movable clasp which would receiver the ring on the gun and slide with ease on the belt......

You can adjust your belt to carry the gun in many ways...........
You can just let it hang and if you adjust the belt the gun always hung off the ground even as you walked............

I used the devise for years and miss it as still have the 30-30 saddle ring carbine......
And as a note a carbine rifle is just a smaller version of the gun and in most cases just shortened to carry on a horse or the Trapper version........

Dad had the oldest registered trap line in northern Alberta and I spent lots of time with him in the bush………….

As a note Dad did have a short type of gun scabbard which could be used to hold the gun as you rode but it was made to easily remove the gun if you did fall off your ride…………….

Dad did say that his Dad and others in the First World War may have been the inventors of the saddle ring and carbine…………
 

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gsteeves is indeed correct. The saddle ring carbine was developed shortly before the Civil War. All cavalry units were issued carbines with this ring. A wide leather sling was slung over the shoulder. a spring loaded snap ring on this strap attached it to the carbine.

Thus the carbine was literally hanging, muzzle down, from the trooper's shoulder. Often issued was a small leather cylindrical boot that attached to a "D" ring on the McClellan saddle. The cavalryman could thrust the muzzle of the carbine through this ring and thus relieve the weight of the carbine from his shoulder as he rode.

In looking at original Civil War carbines I have often seen a semi-curicular wear pattern on the buttstock. The snap ring would wear against the stock, rubbing back and forth as the horse walked, eventually creating a grooved indentation in the wood. This of course is strong indication that the carbine in question had seen saw a lot of "in the saddle" use and has been there and seen action. My great-grandfather, a Union cavalryman, used a carbine sling during the Atlanta campaign - first with a Cosmopolitan carbine, then later with the Burnside, and finally, finishing the war using a Spencer.

Original Carbine slings are expensive. However, reproductions at reasonable cost are available, and can be used with modern carbines that have the ring on the left side of the receiver. The carbine sling was used up until WWI. Later slings were slightly less in width than the C.W. model and had smaller snap rings. The last U.S. Cavalry arm to have a carbine ring was the 1899 Krag Carbine.
 

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The correct Winchester nomenclature for the "saddle ring" is sling ring, and was used the secure a sling to the rifle. It was never referred by them as a saddle ring. That term came much later and was coined by collectors.
 

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Good posts above. On the other hand...for most of us, today, the saddle ring serves two purposes.

1. It makes noise when you want to be silent.

2. It dings up the receiver finish, which is a PITA since Win 94 receivers since the 1970s can't be cold blued to fix finish wear.

I have a couple of Trappers that came with saddle rings. I took them off and put a plug screw in the hole.
 

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1894 Carbine Theads on Muzzel end of Barrel

I have a model 1894 Nickle Steel Barrel Carbine 20" round Barrel marked for smokeless powder it has a saddle ring, but what I want to knw is what are the threads in the muzzel end of the barrel... maybe a Bayonet. I am assuming is was a US calvary piece
 

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I have a model 1894 Nickle Steel Barrel Carbine 20" round Barrel marked for smokeless powder it has a saddle ring, but what I want to knw is what are the threads in the muzzel end of the barrel... maybe a Bayonet. I am assuming is was a US calvary piece
The US Cavalry was not issued 1894 carbines. The threads on the end of your barrel are for a Maxim Suppressor, a factory option during the early years of the 20th Century. Generally speaking, the magazine is shorter by an inch or so to accommodate the device threading on the barrel end. I have seen models 1892, '94 & '95 threaded in this manner.
 

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Shoulder straps for carbine rings are correct for military carbines. If you find a Springfield Trapdoor carbine you will note a raised bar on the side with a ring that attached to a shoulder strap.

The ring on the Winchester lever guns were strictly commercial and served a different purpose. If you recall pictures of the old mountain men you will note how they carried the rifles across the front of the saddle at the pommel. An awkward manner of always having the rifle ready for use. The levergun ring is for a thong which is looped over the saddle horn to carry the firearm while mounted and not have it across the saddle, yet ready for use. A lot of the riders didn't have scabbards to carry the long arm. A shoulder strap would be an unnecessary item for the civilian rider.
 

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.

I've had saddle rings on my lever actions for about 40 years.

If a leather thong is properly tied to the saddle ring, the ring will neither rattle, or sctratch the receiver - AND will not interfere with cyling the lever.




.
 

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kdub has the only correct answer. Loop a thong big enough to go over your saddle horn into the ring. Put the thong over your saddle horn and carry the carbine crossways across the fork. Awkward but if you don't have a scabbard it will work. Ring has nothing to do with preventing wear on the receiver and was not designed for a shoulder sling
 
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