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Discussion Starter #1
Do any of you use the Saeco lubrisizer? I picked one up in a reloading deal but it did not come with directions on how to use it. How hard should the adjustments be to turn? I can't get the cap off to add lube with my hands, Should this need pliers or is this one to tight? Which direction does the lube pressure lever go to add pressure to the lube and how much is enough? I understand it is spring loaded, so I am wondering if it needs just a little pressure or much more than a RCBS or Lyman?
 

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DJK,

While I'm sure someone here can explain things to you regarding SAECO Lubrisizers, a better course of action would be to shoot and e-mail to Redding and ask for an instruction manual on this unit.

You'll then have a manual in hand for all future reference and will be less likely to get into problems and possibly damaging the unit.


Regards
 

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Saeco machines are great.

Regarding the problem... the lube reservoir cap unscrews w/usual CCW motion. Applying pressure to the lube reservoir is done by turning the handle clockwise.

Usually the cap can be removed without undue force by hand once you back off on the lube pressure rod a bit. However if lube has gotten onto the threads it may make it considerably more difficult to get it off.

Try backing the lube pressure adjustment all the way off and when it comes up tight against the cap - it can be used like a small cheater bar to help unscrew the lube reservoir cap. You might also do well to run a hair dryer on high on the cap/reservoir to soften any lube that may be on the threads. If the threads aren't boogered up or rusted - this should be sufficient to get the cap off.

Before reassembly - be sure the threads are cleaned of any lube and apply a little choke tube lube or other anti-sieze greas to the threads to prevent future occurances. Also - it is not necessary to screw the cap on "tight". Run it down until the cap stops and then back off a quarter or half turn. there's plenty of thread bite to keep the cap in place.

Good luck!

Sky C.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
skyc
Thanks for the info, I finally got it apart, it apperantly had been tightened to much as there was almost a 1/2 stick of what appears to be RCBS rifle lube on top of the plunger and spring. Sure made it hard to get apart.:rolleyes:
 

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If you've got an old one of these, the pressure seal is made of leather. If you crank down too tight on them, some of the lube will bypass the seal. I would call Saeco/Redding and get a new one.
 

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Problem luber

It probably sat for a long time before you bought it. All the original Luber designs from before and just after world war two were based on soft automotive, railroad greases, beeswax and candle wax and possibly someone stuch one of the new very hard lubes in it tthat it was not designed for and neither are all the rest of them until the magma star copy came along with heaters.

So you need to heat it up with a hair dryer or placed in a metal bucket with a hundred watt light bulb to soften the lube so it can be unwisted in the normal screw thread manner and the lube melted out.

I answered a couple of questions that appeared when I came on line and once the thread shows up my answer was late.
 

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Saeco Tools By JP Jones

DOUBLEJK said:
Do any of you use the Saeco lubrisizer? I picked one up in a reloading deal but it did not come with directions on how to use it. How hard should the adjustments be to turn? I can't get the cap off to add lube with my hands, Should this need pliers or is this one to tight? Which direction does the lube pressure lever go to add pressure to the lube and how much is enough? I understand it is spring loaded, so I am wondering if it needs just a little pressure or much more than a RCBS or Lyman?
If your Saeco luber is green ask Redding/Saeco

If it is black I may have first sold it and could dig for some original instructions in my files. It sounds like you need to heat it up with a hair dryer or set it in a steel bucket with a spotlight or hundred watt light for a time with a non flammable bucket cover. The lid should go on clockwise and the lube handle the same. number of turns depends on the lube used so count your well lubed bullets. I sold more Star lubers than Saeco to my police and civilian bullseye competitors who wanted the best high volume equipment to win matches. I sold H&G molds only for volume output for gun clubs and police departments for general training but Saeco's for men who wanted the winning.

I really loved Saeco and spent a lot of time there studying every machining proceedure, working and looking over the Cramer bullet mold cherry cutter inventory to see what I wanted modified for my own sales. I was a lifetime competitor and wanted to provide the best available tools for competitors no matter the brand. I made all of my bullet designs for my Star customer bevel base then convinced Star to make me flat punches for nose first sizing over their objections of loss of cutting nose punch income. With them 2 years behind in their orders? So that really simplified my inventory and drastically speeded up lubesizing.

I had package deals of Seaco lead hardness testers, 1,000 watt bottom pour lead pots, 4 cavity Molds with handles, Star Lubers, Star Reloaders or more affordable C-H Auto Champs and the original Saeco green bullet lube.

I have some California Saeco Original instructions that I soon plan to copy if desired.

I sold lower volume Saeco lubers too and have about a hundred original new sizing dies .2240 to .5875, a few top punches of original Saeco designs still used by Redding and I will sell individually or all. Plus two new Saeco double C clamps for the Luber to sell. 2 #24 bottom pour pots good used.

Just a thought. Bob made 45/70 molds in one, two and rarely three cavities. I convinced him that I wanted to sell nothing but 4 cavity molds and really enjoyed selling 4 cav 45/70 300 gr, 344 gr and 405 gr molds to happy customers as the Meehanite metal did not overheat. I felt the 500 grain bullets were to punishing to shoot accurately in matches.

JP Jones Saeco retired
 

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kciH said:
If you've got an old one of these, the pressure seal is made of leather. If you crank down too tight on them, some of the lube will bypass the seal. I would call Saeco/Redding and get a new one.
I bought a black saeco lubrisizer, and it was old enuf to have the leather seal. When I retracted the pressure screw from some very hard lube that came in the used sizer, it pulled right out of the leather.

I called saeco, and asked about the seal. They sent me a free replacement stiff rubber seal.

Found the leather embedded in the lube when I melted it to get it out of the sizer. It was really torn up.

Now, the sizer works fine.

Always retract the pressure screw to relieve lube pressure when you're done using the sizer! Don't store it under pressure!
 

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Use heat on the Saeco to take it apart. I have a commercial heat gun but many hair dryers placed in a bucket with a luber will soften the hardest lube as it was beeswax or candle wax with additives basically.

All lubers when invented used soft lubes that were not very shippable in the heat of summer and I feel the current hard lubes do not coat the barrel as well to prevent leading as the old tried and true ones did..
 
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