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Hi,

I am purchasing my first .270 today. I have decided on a Remington 700 XCR .270 Win.

I know that a rifle is only as good as the scope attached to it and honestly have no idea what scope I need.

I am leaning towards Leupold based on the advise I've heard thus far.

My question is which scope? I will be hunting in Kentucky mainly, so a typical shot would be 200 yards max. But I would still like the ability to reach 300 if needed.

Any suggestions? I have been to Leupold's sight and can't make heads or tails of which model would suit my needs.

Thanks!
 

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I like the VX-II better than the VX-I for the simple reason that it has 1/4 minute cliks (1/4 inch @ 100yds) instead of the 1/2 minute cliks of the VX-I .... it's more money, but you may like it a bit better.....
 

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in addition to the click adjustments on the VX-II's the VX-II's also have MC4 coating through out, the VX-I only has MC4 coating on the exterior lens and the older Magnesium floride coatings on the rest. now i'm a big fan of the Leupold's VX-II's and above but since you went out and got this true all weather condition rifle, why not go with a 4200 Elite by bushnell that has the raingard feature. an all weather rifle aint worth much in rainy weather if you can't see that buck when you lift the rifle up to look through the scope. i beleive Sightron's Big Sky series too has some sort of rain sheilding finish to their lens as well.
 

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Hi,

I am purchasing my first .270 today. I have decided on a Remington 700 XCR .270 Win.

I know that a rifle is only as good as the scope attached to it and honestly have no idea what scope I need.

I am leaning towards Leupold based on the advise I've heard thus far.

My question is which scope? I will be hunting in Kentucky mainly, so a typical shot would be 200 yards max. But I would still like the ability to reach 300 if needed.

Any suggestions? I have been to Leupold's sight and can't make heads or tails of which model would suit my needs.

Thanks!
As my eyes have gotten older I find that high quality optics are more important to me. Leupold makes some good optics as do many other companies. Try to decide on some parameters that you want in a riflescope other than magnification. You can hit accurately at 300 yards with a quality low powered scope as well as a higher powered scope. I particularly like a fast adjustable ocular lens as seen on many European scopes and on the Leupold VX7. The other Leupolds have the traditional American fine threaded ocular adjustments which are very slow. The ocular adjustment is more important to those who have had cataract surgery or poor vision. There are many other companies that make a similar quality scope. IOR, Ziess, Swarovski, Meopta to name a few. You do not have to buy their highest cost scope to get good quality. I found the Ziess Conquest works well and is similar cost to lower to midrange Leupolds.
I think that you should go to a store with several to choose from and test them. Try it on an evening when the ambient light is low and during the day under the sun and compare.
You might ask "Jackfish" on this forum for more info. His is quite knowledgeable about optics and has helped me with binoculars in the past.
Hope you find what you are looking for and enjoy the looking.

Phil
 

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As my eyes have gotten older I find that high quality optics are more important to me. Leupold makes some good optics as do many other companies. Try to decide on some parameters that you want in a riflescope other than magnification. You can hit accurately at 300 yards with a quality low powered scope as well as a higher powered scope. I particularly like a fast adjustable ocular lens as seen on many European scopes and on the Leupold VX7. The other Leupolds have the traditional American fine threaded ocular adjustments which are very slow. The ocular adjustment is more important to those who have had cataract surgery or poor vision. There are many other companies that make a similar quality scope. IOR, Ziess, Swarovski, Meopta to name a few. You do not have to buy their highest cost scope to get good quality. I found the Ziess Conquest works well and is similar cost to lower to midrange Leupolds.
I think that you should go to a store with several to choose from and test them. Try it on an evening when the ambient light is low and during the day under the sun and compare.
You might ask "Jackfish" on this forum for more info. His is quite knowledgeable about optics and has helped me with binoculars in the past.
Hope you find what you are looking for and enjoy the looking.

Phil
I've used Leupold Vari X 2 3x9x40 scopes with CPC reticles for years, I'm in my 70's and have had cataract surgery they work fine for me on my sako 30-06 & 300wm.
 

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If you want the ability to go 300 yards and actually see what you are shooting, (Count the points), I'd go with the VX11 4.5-14.
THat extra power really helps on the long shots and the quality is so good now that the light gathering is close to the 3-9.
I've gone to the larger power scopes just because we had a 10 point rule on our hunting lease. It makes it easier to see those 9th ans 10th points if they are only 3-4 inches long at 250 yards, you can still see them.
Also, I'm just plain older now, and can't see as well.
Good luck
 

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3-9 variable is plenty for what you are doing. By the best leupold you can afford. A VX-1 will certainly do the job and you will be happy with it, but if you have the change laying around to get a VX-2 or a VX-3, go for it.
 

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I know this goes against conventional wisdom, but you might want to consider the Leupold FX 6x42mm fixed 6x scope. I am a big fan of fixed power scopes because they are simple, very sturdy, foolproof and bright. They have no moving parts and fewer lenses than a variable and they are lightweight. They also don't tempt you to fiddle with the power adjustment ring when you should be squeezing the trigger, and can't be inadvertently cranked up so high that you have too narrow a field of view if a nice buck appears at 25 yards.

If you research the subject, you will find many experts who confirm that fixed power scopes virtually never give trouble. In my own experience over 45 years of shooting and hunting, ALL of the scope troubles I have seen or heard of have concerned variable scopes.

The 6x42 is a great scope for low light conditions, works fine for any shot you would ever take with a .270, has enough field of view for shorter ranges and running game, and costs less than a variable.

Call me old-fashioned...
 

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Hi,

I am purchasing my first .270 today. I have decided on a Remington 700 XCR .270 Win.

I know that a rifle is only as good as the scope attached to it and honestly have no idea what scope I need.

I am leaning towards Leupold based on the advise I've heard thus far.

My question is which scope? I will be hunting in Kentucky mainly, so a typical shot would be 200 yards max. But I would still like the ability to reach 300 if needed.

Any suggestions? I have been to Leupold's sight and can't make heads or tails of which model would suit my needs.

Thanks!
here's a source I've used www.cameralandny.com for scopes,binocs,cameras ,etc. check www.shootersproshop.com
 

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.270 scope

I bought my .270 XL7 Marlin bolt rifle 4 weeks ago and I then purchased a Nikon ProStaff 3x9-50MM which I got for $198. I went shooting for the first time a week ago, and I'm very happy with the Nikon scope. In fact I purchase another Nikon ProStaff 3x9-40mm for my .35 Rem 336 Marlin.
 

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I've liked my VX 1's, 2's and 3's as well as Zeiss conquest and burris fullfields but I have excellent vision. I'd consider 2-7x if most shots less than 200 yds cuz smaller, lighter and plenty good for 300 yds as well. Else just find one you like.
 

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I'm kinda partial to the Nikon Monarch 2.5-10 x 42. Clear, takes adjustment, and holds zero. Cost is in the Leupold VX-II and VX-III range. Picked mine up at a local gun shop for $370. Find one you like and buy it, but don't scrimp. If you have to save a little longer to get a better scope then do it. You will not regret it. Weigh your options and read reviews on the ones you've narrowed it down to.
 

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Another option to add to the "mix" is a 2X7 Leupold. It has a wide field of view at the "low" end and plenty of magnification at the "high" end for those 300 yard shots. It's weight is listed at 10.9oz, about the same as most maker's 4 power, and it can be mounted over the bore with "low rings" in most cases.
 

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I use a variety of scopes including Bushnell 3200 & 4200, Nikon Monarchs, a Zeiss Conquest, Weaver Grand Slams & K Series, Sightron Big Skys, Leupold FX-III, Vari-XIII, VX-II, & VX-III, and others. Most of those scopes are used for hunting in coastal or interior Alaska and from point blank range in the brush to 300+ yds. in the tundra.

For your purpose, many of those scopes would do the job, but I'll suggest either the Leupold VX-III 2.5-8x36, the Nikon Monarch 2.5-10x40 long range riflescope, or the Leupold FX-III 6x42 w/ long range duplex reticle. If you can, check those scopes out alongside some high quality scopes by Schmidt & Bender, IQR, or Swarovski.

The first real riflescope I bought was a VariX-II 2-7x33 that still sits on the Wards Western Field M720 in .308 Win. that it was first mounted on. I'm a Leupold fan and also have an M8 3x20, a 1.5-5x20 VariX-III, a VX-II 3-9x40, and my favorites - 2.5-8x36 scopes in both VariX-III & VX-III models and finally a 6x42 FX-III. In the 40 yrs. I've been using Leupolds only one has gone for repair and that one was back within 7 days - which must be some kind of record for Alaska. :D What I really like about the 2.5-8 are its durability, compact size for low mounting, and great eye relief. I've used and abused a VariX-III model of that scope in standard Leupy base and rings on a Rem. 700 in '06 for nearly 30 years and with zero problems. The low mount with the BDL stock brings that scope quickly to eye. I'm also certain that this scope as well as the 2-7 and even 3.5-10 Leupolds have saved me from bloody brows on several occassions.

The Nikon has slightly better optics and low light performance than the Leupy variable at the cost of some eye relief, trim mounting, and Leupold service. This is the scope I put on my long range (300+ yds) rifles, like the 7mm RM 264 WM, and 358 STA. The combination of fine optics and 10x power makes a good long range combination and the higher mounting is not problematic with the slower shots taken at long range. Eye relief is supposed to be 4", but mine measures about 3.78", and I have been dinged at least once by that scope while shooting caribou off a makeshift rest.

Finally, I'll disagree with wildhobbybobby. The FX-III 6x42 Leupold is not an old fashioned scope at all. It is thoroughly modern in design, manufacture, and capability. I think the reliability problems with variables were overcome years ago, but people (at least me) haven't caught up. As much as I try to keep my variable scopes set on low power while hunting, invariabaly (no pun intended) I find them set on high power when I bring them to eye. That isn't a problem with a fixed power scope and along with dusk & dawn optics better than the Nikon, top-of-the-line lens coatings, and the Leupold warrantee makes the 6x42 Leupold my favorite scope for morning and evening spot & stalks for bear. The problems with this scope are its average mounting height and the lack of parallax adjustment. Mounting this scope to line up right requires either a high cheekpiece on the stock or in some cases extension rings. Otherwise it's almost impossible to have a good cheekweld on the stock while looking through this scope. That's OK on a light kicker (maybe your .270), but will beat you up on a heavy kicker like a Wetherby or STA. Another drawback is that the 150 yd. parallax setting from the factory gives you a parallax free reticle from about 25 yds. to infinity, meaning you lose parallax inside about 25 yds. Unfortunately, no adjustable objective ring or third turret parallax adjustment that would solve the problem are available on this scope.
 

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Leupold makes a very good scope i own 2 of them. i have a VX III 3.5-10x50 on a .270 browning bar markII safari and a VX I 2-7x33 on a remington 870 slug gun. both good scopes but i dont like the magnetic adjustments of the VX I. I have heard good things about the nikon prostaff and the buckmaster if you do not want to spend that kind of money. or i also have a zeiss conquest 3-9x50 on a .300 browning BAR. i have to say i do prefer my zeiss over my VX III for the larger field of view but like the reticle on my leupold better.
 
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