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Any thoughts on this? I would like a scope that is very good, even in low light. I would like the scope to function well in daylight, even if the batteries have failed. I am looking for an adjustable scope that will work well up to 350 or so yards.

My rifle has a 20 inch barrel, but it is free floating and I am told that it can be quite accurate with the proper scope.
 

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With advanced age eyesight has become a major problem for me. Used too get by with good medium priced scopes in what ever power range. After six decades I find myself paying double the rifle price on quality glass. That means the Nikon Monarchs, Bushnell Elites, Leupold VX-3 and Zeiss Conguests are filling my eyesight requirements. I also have older scopes that are lesser quality and lower priced but they don't get much usage. Bought several Bushnell top of the line scopes in 1972 and now wish had bought more. I still use those scopes on my hunting rifles and they compare easily to todays scopes costing ten times as much. Added bonus is they have a lifetime warrenty and I will be sending a gun show buy in for service. I have several illuminated recticle scopes some by batteries and others by available light gathering. Had no troubles with either system but I do buy premium lithium batteries for scopes requiring batteries. In the past I've always carried spare battery for emergencies but never had occassion for use provided I change batteries on a yearly basis.

Don't know what you mean by "adjustable scope" but I would keep them too bare minimum i.e. parrelaxe adjustment on higher power scopes. You don't have time fiddling around even at the ranges your talking. You need to be able estimate yardages correctly and know trajectory of your chambering for proper hold over/under from your zero point.

Be very careful of the game laws in your state. Shooting varmits before/after certain times constitutes poaching in my state if I'm interputing them correctly myself. You may want meeting with your local conservation official for clearification.
 

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Commenting on Hailstone's observation, I don't think you will find any of the decent scopes out there to be a problem, when it comes to pulling the trigger during legal shooting hours, anywhere.

I'm also working with 60 year old eyes, and I've found that the Nikon, Weaver, and Leupold scopes, the working guy versions, to all be very good for clarity and light transmission, even after shooting hours here in the east. Usually that runs about 30 minmutes after sunset, or before sunrise.

Some of the Walmart class of scopes would be a problem, but even some of those would be OK most of the day.
 
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