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Discussion Starter #1
Just bought a 338-06 buolt on a ruger.Problem is when i checkthe lands and go according to the lands the bullet does not seat very deep inb the case- actaully just barely past where it boat-tails. I heard it is ruger are sort of like weatherby in ther freebore- is that the case.
and then wher eis a good start for seating the bullet.
im shooting 200 grain nosler ballistinc tips thanks .
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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If this is a magazine type rifle and is used for hunting, I have two parameters that establish seating depth on any given cartridge.

1) The loaded ammo must clear the magazine well and have at least 3/64ths clearance, no matter what type of nose configuration the bullet has.

2) To try and assure enough neck tension and alignment of the bullet with the cartridge case, allow at least one bullet diameter for depth of seating. When measuring boattails, the boattail amount is not included.

This means there is usually a bit of a jump for the bullet to reach the leades but remember, this is a hunting rifle, not a target rifle. The proper feeding from the magazine is paramount.
 

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Re: Seating depth

NAP: I would try starting at a COL of 3.340" and work out from there by groups of three cartridges until I saw the groups at the range begin to change, either for better or worse. You may run into a problem with crimps if you're using a bullet with a cannelure, as you may end up seating the bullet out at a point where you can't crimp into the groove. I have an old 8mm Mauser that has a long throat and end up making my cartridges a bit longer than SAAMI spec, however crimps are not a problem since I'm using a bullet that has a "softer" jacket and the case mouth "bites" it a little.

Best of luck!!
Dave S
 

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Beartooth Regular
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Hi, NAP:
As the other gents said, except that, as Al Miller says in Nosler #3 in his article on the 8mm Mauser, the bullet doesn't need to be more than .25" into the case, not counting the boattail. The BT doesn't have a crimping cannelure, so don't try to crimp it. If the bullets are too loose, sand a thousanth (.001") off the expander plug of your resizing die, at a time, until they are tight.

That bullet has quite a taper. If all else fails, you may have to go to a blunter bullet, like a Speer.

Do a search for seating depth and another for .338-06 in the Handloading and the Rifle Forums. There's several good threads.

Bye
Jack
 

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Gentlemen,

Sizing just off the lands is a good idea, but I think enough neck tension is much more important. I try to make sure that I have at least have one caliber's worth of bullet to neck contact, as any less a fellow runs the risk of ignition difficulties.

As the primer pops, it can push a bullet forward and out of the case mouth, which will drastically influence how efficiently the powder is burned.

I have a few rifles that are free-bored, and a few others that only permit max c.o.l. because of magazine limitations. These rifles still are acceptably accuratte, some remarkably so. Sizing just off the lands is a good idea, if available, but when I can't do that, I am really not terribly bothered.

Good shooting fellows,

Steve
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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My Ruger .338 has an enormous throat. Looks like it's chambered for a beer bottle instead of a .338 Win Mag.

But.... it still shoots great. So, before you get too carried away, just try a few random seating depths that give you enough case neck tension. You might be surprised. I agree with Jack, a quarter inch or so ought to do it.

Speer used to make some really long blunt .338 bullets, 275 or 300 grains. I'd guess that the Rugers were throated for that bullet.

On the other hand, with my old 6.5x55 Swede, I seat 120gr. BTs just barely in the case. If there's much more than 0.100" of case neck gripping the bullets, I'd be surprised. This lets the bullet reach the throat. I've never had a problem with them, and they're fantastically accurate, but I don't take that rifle hunting much either. The 125gr. Partitions and 140gr. Partitions have no such problems in that gun, they're plenty long.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
ok thanks for the info another question will the seating depth affect pressure. I know it will if close to the lands but how aboutif it is seeted deeper yet farther from the lands thansk once again
 

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Anytime the seating depth is altered, in or out, it affects the case capacity. This leads to differences in pressure if you are comparing a round with the same amount of propellant but different seating depths. The severity of the pressure increase would depend on many variables of the actual rifle and components being used. It sounds like your best bet would be load your rounds to magazine length, since you won't have any problems chambering them and start from there. It isn't a very good idea to work a load up to the maximum and then decrease the OAL to any signifigant degree without lowering the powder charge somewhat and working back up.
 
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