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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I was wondering if I could carry a Ruger Security Six in the woods with Buffalo Bore 180 grain 1,400 FPS. I don't plan on shooting much of it, to be sure, but I was curious if shooting a couple of cylinders of the really heavy stuff could potentially damage a Security Six. My SP101 seems to handle the heavy stuff just fine, but the Security Six is older and has a different design. The top strap does seem fairly strong, however. Below, see pic of the gun that I'm thinking of buying.

On a separate topic, I've heard that Ruger "corrected" some weaknesses in the Security Six design when the company switched over to making GP100's instead. Is that true? The GP100 is just so dang heavy for a .357. I like the weight of a Security Six better. Is the added weight of a GP100 worth it if a guy is walking around all day with the gun on his belt?

If a Security Six could handle a few practice rounds of heavy 357 mag and the potential for needing to unload a full cylinder in a hurry out in the woods if a bear comes along, then I think I will favor getting the Security Six over the GP100. I know that 357 caliber is very light for bear anyhow, but I would not be taking the Security Six into the deep woods, just down by the river about an hour outside of town where I like to fish.
 

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The Security Six and its family, are capable of standing up to about anything a K Frame S&W would take.

When they were first available, a law enforcenment buddy, and his fellow officers put a set of Rugers through the wringer to determine if it was a suitable option for the force.

They fed a pair of them, in stainless and blued finish, a continuous diet of factory ammo for over a year. A fair pile of it was Speer Lawman stuff. Anybody who wanted to practice used them, they were cleaned only once in a while. Between both guns, they logged something like 30K rounds, and aside from a bit of wear at the forcing cone, they were still going strong.

I doubt if you could even afford to shoot one out at the cost of todays factory stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Interesting

Thank you for the response! Wow, quick response time, very cool. If anyone out there has experience to share about their experience or grapevine stories about HEAVY LOADS being shot through the Security Six 357 model that would also be interesting. I wonder if the year the SS was made would have any bearing? That picture in my above post looks like a late model SS to me, and it might be better equipped to handle HEAVY 357 MAG.

I've heard the Security Six's are good guns that stand up to heavy use and the ravages of time and the elements. But I have never heard a thing about how they handle heavy loads. Back in the time they were made, I don't think very many folks were shooting factory made 180 grain 357 ammo.

I know that I would not shoot 180 grain through an S&W 357 in any model. It would make me too nervous. I know that a K FRAME S&W would handle it, at least in a pinch situation, but things could go wrong. I have heard horror stories. At the very least, a fellow could ruin a very expensive gun that way.

Modern Rugers are made for heavy ammo. I've got a 454 Alaskan that eats heavy ammo for breakfast, lunch and dinner. I tend to carry 45 Colt 325 grain 1325 FPS ammo in that gun, and for target practice I shoot regular factory standard grain 45 Colt.

I could carry the Alaskan to go fishing in the foothills, but it's pretty darn heavy on my hip. Maybe a shoulder holster for that gun would do the trick instead of buying a Security Six. There's a stainless security six down at the local gun store here in Portland selling for $375. Not a bad price, and about half the price of an expensive shoulder holster rig for my 454 (in leather).

Eventually, I plan on loading my own bullets. I need to buy the equipment, and probably will do so by summer time.
 

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Kirk,

The GP100 frame is a little heavier, I think. This is about long-term wear. 30,000 rounds vs. 50,000 rounds of normal life, and about withstanding being dropped. I wouldn't worry about it. If you go to 180 grain Beartooth bullets handloaded for practice with H110/296, you'll find the bullet's length prevents using enough powder for pressure to be excessive. That also means a lower total gas volume affecting erosion.

I'm not sure how BB is getting to 1400 fps at that bullet weight in 4" barrels. Perhaps they're using the new Alliant 300MP powder or its equivalent? Whatever the means, they guarantee the loads safe in any .357 steel revolver, so it shouldn't be an issue for you with whatever revolver you choose.

Did you think about the .41 Rem Mag as a compromise for bear defense?
 

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Back in the time they were made, I don't think very many folks were shooting factory made 180 grain 357 ammo.
I think the Security Six came into the Market before SAAMI dropped the working pressures for the .357/44M's. Speer Lawman and Super Vel were pretty hot stuff.

Bullet weight isn't the problem, working pressures are.

My No.1 load for my .357 BH is a Penn Bullets 180gr TC, over a no longer acceptable charge of 2400. It's snappy. But it hasn't wrecked anyone's M60 J Frame, or M19 K frame either. But it's not a load that you'd shoot all the time, unless you're a MS competitor. And for that the Security Six isn't the tool.
 

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yes the security six will handle 180gr. buffalo bore etc. I find in my two sec. 6's I don't get the accuracy out of them that I want. Pretty stout recoil so get some good grips that fit you. I much prefer a 158-160 gr flat nose hard cast met-plat. If you want a bigger boom get a bigger gun. some nice .44's can be had for decent prices. The cor-bons and buffalo bores shoot fine out of my S&W highway patrolman.
 

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Load it, hang on tight and shoot away. You' will be worn out before the gun is unless you do some serious shooting every day with it.
 

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:):)I owned a 6" blued security six and know it handled heavy loads with no problems. Like an idiot, I sold it! I bought a GP to replace it and it is a lot heavier. I would'nt mind having another security six----getting harder to find though. You better buy it!
 

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I have a GP100 six inch with the half lug and I bought my wife a Security Six four inch stainless steel and then myself another four inch Security Six but mine is blued.
They all handle 180 grain Cast Performance over H-110 loads without a hitch and shoot very accurately. It will be fine for all but the biggest biters you might possibly encounter.
 

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Yes the GP is a more robust, but the security six wasn't dropped due to weakness. The GP was easier to manufacture, hence a better profit margin. If you have a Security Six they are fine guns and are my preference as they are quite durable and are the "right" size.
 

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I have a four inch stailess sec six I bought way back in 1976,it is as tight today as in the day I purchased it, it is tank strong and a joy to carry because of the weight,if you are going to use 180 grains go ahead and do so with confidence, but I recommend to use good grips that fit your hands well because it really kicks with hot loads with heavy bullets.
Enjoy it
 

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I have shot the Buff bore you speak of[two rounds actually] out of my Ruger Security six. Mine is stainless, with a 2 3/4" barrel. It was an experience.............

When you squeeze, hang on, and ya better wear welding goggles, because the flash from my shorty was unbelievable :eek:

I tend to shoot more of the 'factory' range loads from the security six, and leave the hot stuff to the GP100.
The Sec.-six will handle all you need to do, have the abilities of the K-frames, and actually be a bit stronger.

Buy it, and don't regret it.

 

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Chris, that's a really nice looking revolver there!

My local guy has a 6 inch stainless Security Six for sale and wants $500 for it I think. It's been hard not to make him an offer. He is where I got both my 4 inch Sixes.
 

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While the collectability and multi-purpose of a 6 incher is a great thing, $500 seems a bit high...at least to me anyhoo.

The one pictured I bought from a retired cop for $150.00;)
 

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The K frames are not that strong. The L frames are stronger and still not on a par w/the Security (SS). I would assume that the N frames are on a par w/the SS. The SS is stronger that a Colt. My basis for this is similar to what Tman had to say.

I do not know how strong the SA revolvers are to it by comparison.

I suppose that the GP-100 is stronger, but I don't know if you can prove it...notice what Tman said about 50K rounds.

I'm a thinking, that I read that Ruger switched to the 100 in order to make them easier (cheaper) to produce as production time is money.
 
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