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If I'm not mistaken, and please correct me if I'm wrong, Shiloh Sharps is currently building rifles in Big Timber Montana, but was located in Farmington New York for awhile.  Are there any quality or value differences in the rifles that were made in Farmington vs. Big Timber?  Any company differences, besides location?
 

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Last I heard they currently have a 4-year waiting list on rifles, so apparantly a lot of people think their rifles are pretty good.
Mark
 

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I haven't heard an ill word said about them, but... I recently saw a Shiloh for sale, and while it was used, it barely looked so.  It could've been mistaken for NIB.  Apparently it was made by Shiloh when they were still in Farmington, before the move to Montana.  I was just wondering if the ownership had changed and if the move was for the better or worse as far as quality and collector value is concerned.  While the rifle is still a pretty penny, the price seems a little on the low side for the cost of new considering the long waiting period for a new one and the cost of new one.  Like I said this one could very well pass for NIB, no wear or tear is visible and bore and rifling are clean and crisp.  No handling markets, dents or dings.  I guess Alaska is not a great market for these rifles, though.
 

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Alyeska, Just had an eye opener experience. Ive heard Shilo was a customer oriented business yet when I made final changes to my order prior to product I was taken back by rudness and sarcasim. I had also just bought a $550.00 sight and as I was leaveing I said to myself this was not a pleasent experience.
This was not a cheap rifle!
I own several Sharps rifles and carbines some are orginals.
The C. Sharps are of equal quality. They're parts are cnc mechined opposed to cast. They do not require a none refundable deposit. they do not require prepayment in full prior to completion.
I have been treated with courtsy and respect at C. Sharps as well as they have provided a wealth of information.
I will not do any business with Shilo in the future.
I can be treated that way at any fast food resturants by an adolesent.
 

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i just recieved my second rifle from shilo sharps in montana.the first one took 4 years this one 19 months.the workmanship is excellent and worth the wait and the money.
 

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I think both the Sharps are excellent rifles. I have considered the "Farmington", if it's the same one, and it is a deal. I just wanted a different caliber as I have a little trouble with the recoil on the big bores. There are really quite a few of these fine rifles in Alaska, and I think that the Alaska Rifle Club still holds several long range matches each year. Contact their web site for more info.
 

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T-Bird,
This was an old topic that was recently revived. My last post in this thread, before this one, was 5 years ago...
 

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Sorry bout that. Guess I should pay more attention to the dates.
Fact is the Farmington is for sale at "new Gun Traders" on Muldoon. VERY nice specimen.
I will try to pay more attention, if I have to.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
T-BIRD said:
Sorry bout that. Guess I should pay more attention to the dates.
Fact is the Farmington is for sale at "new Gun Traders" on Muldoon. VERY nice specimen.
I will try to pay more attention, if I have to.
No, you don't have too. Just didn't want to give you the wrong impression. Figured we were talking about 2 different rifles... That's all. ;)

No problem here.

I think someone brought this thread back to the top because they have a beef with Shiloh and wanted to vent. We've all been there before, at one time or the other with different manufacturers/shops.

Just thought our wires were crossed.
 

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alyeska338....I got my 74 from them when they were in
Farmington. Shiloh and C.Sharps were somehow connected back then,I believe.That was 1985.
Never got it to shoot to my likeing so 3 or 4 years ago I called both companies and expressed my concerns and it
was Shiloh that corrected the problem with apologizies
for the inconvenience.No charge! I wouldn't hesitate to buy another rifle from Shiloh.
 

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Shiloh Sharps: I stopped by their factory in Big Timber, Montana last week, on my way back from the Bucking Horse Sale in Miles City, Montana. Spoke with Phyliss Bryant and Heather while there, the ladies at the front desk. As usual, they were cordial and polite and answered several questions I had about doing some 'tweaking' with the layout on their military rifle configuration. I've been through their factory, spoken with the owners/employees, and visited with them at the Quigley Match in Forsyth, Montana on several occassions, and have found them to be good people. Now none of us are perfect people out there, and we all have our not so good days. But I'd not hesitate one bit to purchase another Shiloh Sharps from them. They make a very fine and quality product, and their help/support has always been first rate, in my experiences.
The 4-5 year waiting period is long history, and they can usually finish a custom rifle in about 10 months, but call the factory and double check on this. A few years ago they cleaned up the long waiting list, for it is no more. They even stock 10-20 finished cataloged rifles behind the counter. So Shiloh Sharps are not that long in coming, once the order is placed.
It was in Farmingdale, New York, where Shiloh's were first made, before moving to Big Timber, Montana. I've used my older 1977 vintage Farmindale Shiloh military carbine in .45-70 for 'hunting' caribou out around Naknek/King Salmon, Alaska for several years, back in the early 1990's. They maek meat, that's for certain.
Personally, the rifles Shiloh produces today are a more refined rifle than the oldeer Farmingdale made ones.

C.Sharps: Just a block down the street from Shiloh Sharps factory! John Schoffstall is a fine gentleman, and a pleasure to visit with. C.Sharps GNC machines, whereas Shiloh does more castings of their components. I've used C.Sharps in the past, and they are one finely made quality rifle indeed...with one of their models coming up on the horizon for me this next year.

Both factories produce quality and highly refined products. You'd not be disappointed with having either one make a rifle of your choosing. They're more accurate than most people can hold n' shoot 'em...
 

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Well I guess I'll revive this thread again......
The Sharps rifle I have is labeled Shiloh Rifle Mfg Co on the reciever.
It is marked "Old Reliable" on the top of the barrel and also says C. Sharps Arms Co. Inc on the top of the barrel.
If you look on the bottom of the barrel under the forearm, it is marked Shiloh Rifle Mfg Inc.
I am told by those who know more than me, that this was one of the Farmingdale rifles, but am not so sure. The reciever serial # 70xx and the number on the bottom of the barrel match. Possibly mid 80's?
So whatever I have, there seems to be some affiliation at some point between the two companies. Or maybe they got their barrels from a common source at one time.
What I do know, is that it shoots well and has an extremely tight chamber. No room for sloppy loading with this one!
Any comments, suggestions or information on this one, would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
Larry
 

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I believe that the gentleman at C. Sharps has the rights to the term "Old Reliable". He was apparently associated with the original Shiloh Sharps company, but somewhere along the way he parted with them. It is my impression that strained feelings still exist between the two companies, even though they are in the same small town.

That being said, there is a third small company, Axtell, about 150 miles West of Big Timber, in Sheridan Montana ,that makes the 1877 model Sharps rifle.This is an improvement on the 1874 rifle, developed by the original Sharps company after feedback and suggestions from target shooters of that era. I have two of these 1877 rifles, one in 40-70 Sharps Straight and another in 45-90. They are great people to deal with and make a high quality rifle. www.riflesmith.com My last rifle was delivered in exactly 10 months.
 

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8iowa,
I see you shoot the 40-70 Sharps straight and the 45-90. I am looking for a set of dies for each of those calibers.
Thanks
Larry
 

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Bestboss:

I have Lyman dies in both 40-70SS and 45-90. These are three die sets. I have added three more dies for each caliber, a neck sizing die, a compression die, and a taper crimp die. That makes a total of six, which fills up the turret on my Lyman Mag II press.

I had to make a compression die by ordering the compression plug from Buffalo Arms, and screwing it into a Lyman universal decapping die body.

The 45-90 is easy, the 40-70SS not so. The original 40-70's had a bore size of .403. Because this cartridge was never standardized by SAAMI, 40-70SS chambers will vary from one modern manufacturer to the next. The Shiloh Sharps uses a modified 405 Winchester case and the 1877 Axtell uses a "stretched" 30-40 Krag case. The .408 bore is now pretty standard among modern manufacturers.

Thus, my cartridges may not chamber in your rifle and vice versa. None of the 40-70SS rifles made today have the same chamber, headspace, and bore of the 19th century rifles. This does not make any of them wrong, for there are no standards.

Before investing in 40-70SS dies you need to make sure that the dies that you purchase are right for your particular rifle.

There is no problem with the 45-90, thanks to it's powerful and influential parent, the 45-70.
 
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