Shooters Forum banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
i recently purchased a reminton 7600 nib 180th anniversary edition 30-o6 with full intention of using this beautiful rifle at the range and hunting. now my dillema is that maybe it should stay nib. one side of me thinks this rifle would have more value left to my kids as a beautiful rifle that i used on a regular basis , the other side says not too touch. any thoughts , as this dilema is ruining sleep ,
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,404 Posts
Only way it will be a collectable is if production numbers are extremely limited. You won't see it in your lifetime nor will your children. Lucky if your grandchildren will benifit from it being collectable.

Shoot it and enjoy it while you can then pass it down to one of your children. I have rifles and shotguns that my grand father and father owned. Although I don't use them much they are still as accurate as the day I learned too shoot. Two were under water for two months back in '97 during a flood. Didn't have time to clean up after flood water receided so had a local gunsmith take them apart and clean. After getting them back decided too re-zero the rifles. Pleasently supprised when they shot to point of aim. Brought back many priceless memories of gopher hunting with my grandfather.
 

·
Piney Woods Moderator
Joined
·
6,267 Posts
Shoot it and enjoy it. You wouldn't buy a fancy sports car and not drive it would you? Enjoy the finer things in life while you can. I hope it shoots as well as it looks.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,439 Posts
Go through the auction forums and see if you can find others like it that have sold, and if so, for how much. Gun values have always varied locally, but the Internet now equalizes that some. Otherwise, get a Blue Book of Gun Values that is current. Here in Ohio I figure to knock about 20% off whatever the Blue Book says about a gun to come up with what I might get for it here.

Either method should give you some sense of whether or not it has risen in value appreciably. If so, I would sell it so I could buy something new to shoot and pocket the difference.

I would guess that in a slow economy collectors are going to be bargain hunting for desperation sales, and that may tend to hold prices down. But I don't know that for a fact, and whether that's true or not, if things pick back up again in the next ten years or so, collectibles will likely appreciate more. If you find there were few enough produced that it really is a collectible, then it may be worth hanging onto it for that kind of time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
978 Posts
> this rifle would have more value left to my kids

There is not that much time left, shoot and enjoy it now.

Besides, buying commodities and hoping they hold their value over the long term is a risky investment. You never know what the future will bring. Including death, thief, fire, floods, tornados, air planes falling from the sky, it being banned, or the falling out of the commodity itself or the brand with the public.

If it is not worth $3000 now, 2 oz. of gold, it is unlikely to increase in value in the future to beyond what 2oz. of gold will be in the future. Unless it was personally signed by Mr. Heston or has a very unusual feature or Remington went out of business the year it was issued and didn't issue a 200th anniversary rifle twenty years later. It is steel and wood.

A new undriven 1976 Corvette pace car is worth just about what it was worth brand new in 1976, when you factor in inflation. You see this a lot at the Barrett Jackson auctions on the "investments".

I would hunt and shoot it knowing you have a really nice rifle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,783 Posts
I think buying stuff to not use, so someone else might one day have something that may be valuable, is a waste of today's money.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
605 Posts
In 1966 I bought a Winchester Commerative rifle ... the '66 Centennial. Cost me $125 1966dollars. It was a M94 Winchester, .30-30 with a 24" octagon barrel, gold plated receiver (inside as well as outside) and a gold plated buttplate. I bought it as a collectable and stored the rifle away. It was one of the very first commeratives.

Fast forward to 2009. I investigated the worth of my Centennial '66. New In Box, Unfired, with Papers, value was just under $500. So, in 43 years it had increased in value by $375, and that's without inflation. What a waste. So I promptly bought a Williams Gunsight Receiver Sight and hunted with the rifle. What a joy to carry and shoot and look at. It was finally in it's element ... in the woods, deer hunting.

Shoot the rifle, hunt with it. Collect game with it. Your kids will relate more to that than to any collector value it might or might not have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,650 Posts
Sinbad,
I'm glad I'm not the only one that feel for those things, I did the same thing. While it is a pretty rifle and I wouldn't get rid of it, I could have put that money in bank savings account and have a much greater return on it as an investment. I like the looks of the lever actions, I even bought one of the brass, Henry 30-30's when they came out, just because of what it was and will probably never shoot it, and knowing it will never have any collectors value.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,280 Posts
Firearms are typically a good investment if you use them, as collector items the most valuable have been used by somebody else that was famous. Nobody know what will be scarce in the future. I recently purchased a Ruger No. 1 that only 250 were made in that chambering. Its uncatalogued, an odd cartridge, and has exceptional figure to the stock. I'm gonna hunt with it and enjoy it, sitting in my safe waiting to make a dollar is pointless.

If you're gonna make investments, make eternal investments, money is not eternal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
well the issue is settled , the bases and rings are going on , it will be used and enjoyed . thanks for the insight
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,872 Posts
Well, according to some (and the way this country's been going the last couple of three years, I'm starting to believe them) the world will end in 2012, so I would sight it in and hunt with it. (:)D))
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,106 Posts
I'm as guilty of "collecting" as anyone. :eek:

Actually............... I'm more of an "accumulator". I don't have any real collector guns. But I do have some '94 leverguns in oddball calibers and configurations that I have no need to hunt with and cannot bring myself to do so. I just like to look at them.

Call me goofy. You won't be the first. ;) :D :rolleyes: :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,280 Posts
You're just goofy! :D

I guess you can't hunt with them all at the same time, just don't have enough trigger fingers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,280 Posts
It wasn't as satisfying as I hoped it would be.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
199 Posts
In 1966 I bought a Winchester Commerative rifle ... the '66 Centennial. Cost me $125 1966dollars. It was a M94 Winchester, .30-30 with a 24" octagon barrel, gold plated receiver (inside as well as outside) and a gold plated buttplate. I bought it as a collectable and stored the rifle away. It was one of the very first commeratives.

Fast forward to 2009. I investigated the worth of my Centennial '66. New In Box, Unfired, with Papers, value was just under $500. So, in 43 years it had increased in value by $375, and that's without inflation. What a waste. So I promptly bought a Williams Gunsight Receiver Sight and hunted with the rifle. What a joy to carry and shoot and look at. It was finally in it's element ... in the woods, deer hunting.

Shoot the rifle, hunt with it. Collect game with it. Your kids will relate more to that than to any collector value it might or might not have.
Hey there Sinbad!

I think your story here is absolutely hilarious! I must have cracked up for a whole 2-3 minutes! :D

PS.

Reminds me of my T/C .50 cal., Hawken Silver Anniversary. I called up Thompson Center about a year ago and asked them about its current value. They were incorrect in thinking that I wanted to sell it. They just laughed and told me to sell it for whatever I could get for it! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,106 Posts
It wasn't as satisfying as I hoped it would be.
Sorry, man. I can't set myself up much better for you than that. :p

Anyways.............. you should see my babies. Bet you'd have a hard time shooting them, too. ;)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
199 Posts
I'm as guilty of "collecting" as anyone. :eek:

Actually............... I'm more of an "accumulator". I don't have any real collector guns. But I do have some '94 leverguns in oddball calibers and configurations that I have no need to hunt with and cannot bring myself to do so. I just like to look at them.

Call me goofy. You won't be the first. ;) :D :rolleyes: :D
Hey there Magnumitis!

Don't worry about it, you're in good company my friend! I think most of us here are crazy enough about guns to just sit, look, and admire them...

However, I believe your problem is just a tad bit different. Not only are you crazy about guns, but you also seem to be inordinately given to voluminous bores and propellants. Now, I think that this peculiarity is just plain _ ole _ "goofy"!

It's like some kind of disease or something....

Now, what should we call this disease?

Hey! I know! We'll call it...MAGNUMITIS! :D

PS.

I'm sorry! I just found the invitation too irresistable! :)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
199 Posts
i recently purchased a reminton 7600 nib 180th anniversary edition 30-o6 with full intention of using this beautiful rifle at the range and hunting. now my dillema is that maybe it should stay nib. one side of me thinks this rifle would have more value left to my kids as a beautiful rifle that i used on a regular basis , the other side says not too touch. any thoughts , as this dilema is ruining sleep ,
Hi there Canuk!

I was debating your situation...I currently own serveral firearms that sometime ago, I felt were investments. Personally, deep down inside, I still feel as though they will eventually be worth possibly 1000% more than what I paid for them. As time goes by, I am certain that they will continue to acrue in value. However, the only manner in which they can gain value is if, they are in good-excellent condition. They therefore, either can't be used or they have to be used sparingly and carefully. I have therefore, decided that I will keep those few guns in storage (hoping that they don't get pawned by some wayward relative) and to treat them delicately. I will have fun with the remainder of my collection.

If I can have a field gun, and a gun of admiration, both in the same caliber and simliar make, then I'd go that way. Otherwise, I'd just have fun and not worry about it! :)

You only live once! What the heck?
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top