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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have what may be an odd question, but if anybody can help me find an answer, it's all you crazy gun nuts! :)

When I'm shooting anything except rimfire ammo, I reach a point where my eyes don't focus quite as well and my groups definitely start to open up. The more powerful the gun, the faster this happens, sometimes in less than 20 rounds, unless I am really taking my time and firing only 3-shot groups. Shooting a pistol with LER scopes makes it happen sooner than a long gun, usually.

I'm thinking it's my eyes, which I haven't had checked in over a year, but I'm wondering if any of you have experienced anything similar? Do any of you find that your shooting actually improves the longer you shoot on a given day, or does it slowly get worse, the more rounds you send downrange?

Looking forward to your comments.

Jason
 

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bud,, i can t afford to shoot anymore, much.. but my first shot with any of my guns sighted in correctly..were most times my best shots..jmo ..slim
 

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I'm in my 70s. When I get through shooting an IDPA
match I really feel beat. I think what you are experiencing
is pretty normal, and probably gets worse as you get older.

Zeke
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Do you think it has more to do with the mental concentration, or is it something to do with a man's eyes getting tired? I have found I shoot less than I used to, or take a lot longer time at it.
 

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Do you think it has more to do with the mental concentration, or is it something to do with a man's eyes getting tired? I have found I shoot less than I used to, or take a lot longer time at it.
I think it is a little of both. The older we get, the longer it takes to to everything. I'm not sure to tell you what to do about your parcicular situation, but I just live with it.
 

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Light is an issue with me. A sunny,bright day is hard on my eyes. An overcast day, never a problem. I can't shoot well with glasses on and probably wouldn't if I could, so that rules out sunglasses.
Ditto. I'm bordering on albinism over here, and sun is HUGE for me. Some days I almost can't even keep my eyes open. Now, the problem gets about 10X worse when you're looking through a scope and really trying to choose your spot on paper.

Under ideal (for me) conditions however, I find that if I set out 3 or 4 pop cans at 200 yards, and pick those off first, my first 3 shot group comes in considerably smaller than it does otherwise. I suppose that's just a bit of "getting in the zone".
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
See Mars, that's what I'm trying to get at, I guess. I feel like when I'm "on my game", I can shoot just like I did when I was 22, but it doesn't come easy, anymore. I'm going to schedule an appt. with my eye doctor to see if maybe he has some answers for me...I'm really frustrated because I'm trying to wring out a new cartridge and I feel like I'm the biggest limitation in getting it to group well. :(
 

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Do you shoot with both eyes open? If I don't, I find that my open eye will get a bit strained after a while. That's normal, I think. I asked a competition shooter about it and he said that after a while his eyes often feel strained and his vision gets blurry. So he closes both his eyes often and it seems to help. It also helps him keep his natural point of aim. It's also good to focus on something close to you every few shots.
 

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Get prescription shooting glasses. Get the light sensitive lenses that darken a little if you need that? Be careful when you focus a scope that your eyes are relaxed so you don't bring its image into focus only with them tensed.

In service rifle matches, lousy focus always seems to start when you get to the 600 yard line for your last 20 rounds. You are, however, in prone with your neck keeping your head up. It is fatiguing. A common technique in shooting slow fire prone, so you don't come out of the sling, is to stop and stare at the grass for short time before getting back on the sights. The brightness and color of it seems to let your eyes relax.
 

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whenever i shoot my bow the longer i shoot the worse i get until i stop and start really concentrating on everything i do. i believe the same applies while shooting guns with the exception of drawing back a bow every time you shoot. i have also found that changing up the range can help my groups with a bow, just something to try. i have no idea on what to do about the sun issue.
 

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I've found that the poor optical quality of many scopes magnifies eye strain which equates to poorer groups. After divesting myself of some really poor scopes and purchasing higher quality scopes for replacement this issue doesn't rear its ugly head as often.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm trying to decide if I want a big ol' floppy hat...or grape pie. Haven't had dessert yet...I believe I'll go for the grape pie!
 

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broom_jm; Dont feel bad, my eyes are always blurry and my groups are always big! I went out and shot around 100 rounds today with the 44 Mag Redhawk...working up loads. I could barely see to drive the hour and 15 minutes back to the house, and I am plain tuckered out. I think to one degree or another it happens to all of us. I was a competitive shooter and after a National Match Course or Benchrest event, I had nothing left!!! As much fun as shooting is, its too bad it has to be so strenuous.
 

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I've had this issue as well. Both Eye strain and physical fatigue while shooting. after a big bore pistol match sometimes the hands are down right shaky and I'm not even 30 yet, (until March that is). tired shakey hands do not make for good groups scope or no scope. An appointment with an optometrist would be a good start. Consider soft contact lenses if you need corrective lenses. I've found that I shoot much much better with them than with my glasses of the same perscription. also try keeping both eyes open while shooting. If your scope eye is not your dominant eye this can be challenging :eek: I'm reading Ultimate Sniper and the author suggests several techniques for dealing with eye strain. keeping both eyes open is number one. (I'll try to think of some of the others too) This has to do with pupil dilation. Since unless you have a head injury both your eyes should respond to the light hitting one eye and react evenly even if the light is not even between the two, they try to seek a balance. The closed eye will cause the pupils to want to dilate more than the open one wants to be since it is in the dark esentially. The pupil that is exposed to more light is more suseptible to strain since it is taking in more light than it should have to for its balanced diameter. I would bet that keeping your perscription up to date will actually help more than the both eyes open technique but these issues are cumulative. I think one of the other techniques is trying not to focus on the one little spot in the bulls eye you want to hit until the exact moment of breaking the shot. This will keep you from straining as much as your eye can drift just a bit instead of trying to lock on to the tiniest of points. Making sure you have a good piece of glass on top of your rifles and that they are in focus is also a good idea.

I really thought my eyes were screwed up this spring after mounting a vortex scope on one of my rifles. my shots kept spreading as the session went on. after a few minutes of twisting knobs on the scope and head scratching I just shot 10 or 12 rounds without trying to figure it out keeping the same point of aim. turns out the scope was not holding a zero. DOH! started to see a 1 MOA clime with every shot real regular like.. it drew a virtical line up the paper and into the dirt. swopped out that $400 scope for a $35 North American hunter special and got the groups back down where they should be. Sending the Vortex back to be fixed or replaced. :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Helix,

I have used that trick of not focusing intently until I'm "ready" to send one downrange and I've also had that feeling I was really losing it, only to find out my scope was bouncing back n' forth between two positions, due to something being broken, internally.

I've never worn contacts but after the severe fogging my glasses suffered in cold weather hunts this last fall, I had already planned to talk to the doctor about them...this gives me another reason to do so.

I have always closed my left eye when using any kind of sight but shoot a shotgun with both eyes open. Sounds like I may want to try doing both that way.

Man, it sucks getting old...
 

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Get prescription shooting glasses. Get the light sensitive lenses that darken a little if you need that? Be careful when you focus a scope that your eyes are relaxed so you don't bring its image into focus only with them tensed.
Ditto. If you get prescription lenses, make sure they focus at the same distance as your front sight; something closer to reading glasses than driving glasses.
 

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for fogged glasses try Cat Crap... No don't raid the litter box. it is a product you can find at a ski shop it is a waxy substance that comes in a small red plastic container. spread it on both inside and out of your glasses and they won't fog near as bad but will still look clear. it isn't perminent so you may have to reapply especially if it is wet out.
 

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what about that lazor surgery on the eyes.. ive heard great things an a few real dissappointed results from aquaintances..
they even say it works on a stigmatism,now.. thats what i have.. nearly burned the left eye out once ,,with brick mason motor mix...slim
 

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laser surgery, I've been thinking about that for a while too. the main draw backs the last time I looked into it were if you go to high altitudes you can have a problem but normally it should work fine you may also have an issue with halos around lights at night but not so bad you can't deal with it. I did hear about one guy who was blinded but that was likely malpractice. As with anything research the doc you plan to have do the cutting.
 
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