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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Well, I had a couple of rain free cool days in which to check out my new Ruger Ultra Light Hawkeye rifle in .308 Caliber. I have an opportunity earlier to sight it in @ 50 yards, but now wanted to see how it shot (Group wise) @ 100 yards. I use Winchester Factory 150 grain power points and yesterday morning and shot several 5-shot groups to see how it performed. Also shot some handloads that were accurate in my Browning A-Bolt. To my disappointment; I was only able to obtain 2 ½” groups with BOTH factory & handloaded ammo. I stopped and returned to the house and cleaned the bore and decided to check out everything. The scope & rings were fine, as well as the eye relief and I know the ammo was fine too. I then checked the stock screws but when I examined them I found that the middle “action” screw was WAY too tight as well as the other two screws. I took a proper sized screw driver and tried to loosen the three Screws to re install them. Well, I couldn’t even budge them as it was like they were glued in!! So I called Ruger’s Tech. Dept. and told them of the problem and also what size groups I was receiving. The nice person told me that the screws should not be so tight that one couldn’t remove them, and he suggested that I take the rifle to a Gunsmith to have the screws removed & reinstalled. I also asked him about this new type “LC6” trigger which I told him seemed to be a little creepy & had a very heavy pull. He told me that the LC6 trigger is not adjustable. To be honest, I couldn’t see very much difference in their old Model 77 MKII trigger compared to their new LC6 trigger. So I took my Rifle to a local Gunshop and even the guy there had trouble removing the screws!! He had to tap them with a hammer to remove them. We found that they had some sort of sealant or glue on the threads!! Also the trigger had almost an 7 pound trigger pull & the rifle only weighs something like 7 ¾ pounds!! So I am having them to install a Timney Trigger adjusted to 3 pounds. I have a regular Ruger Model 77 MKII in .270, which I had a Timney Trigger installed, years ago, and it shoots almost one hole groups @ 100 yards with good handloads. Don’t know why Ruger doesn’t place better triggers on their rifles.
 

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I've always been a Ruger fan but they have not had a good trigger since they did away with their adjustable one. As far as accuracy I've been lucky with their guns. I purchased a Stevens .243 and a Savage 7mm-08 youth rifle for my boys to hunt with and they are a dream to shoot. The accu trigger on the Savage is sweet. Rugers are well made but would not be my first choice if I wanted consistant out of the box accuracy. Their customer service is great. If I had to own just one rifle for all conditions it would be an allweather MKII in a .338 Win.
 

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We have a Mark 2 in 06 . the trigger was polished up by our gunsmith when we got the rifle . You really do not have to replace it .
As far as grouping , a lot of new rifles take a hundred rounds or so to show what they are going to do. I have had a few that have done just that .
 

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The triggers on the MKII and Hawkeye M77s are of different design, with the new LC6 trigger being in the Hawkeye as already mentioned. I own Rugers from all phases, original tang safety, MKII and Hawkeye and the triggers do vary a good bit in performance. The best one I have is a NIB older tang safety model in .284 Win I bought about a year ago (1984 gun), very nice trigger. Second best is one of my two Hawkeyes, a .338 Fed. The other Hawkeye in .358Win has a terrible (LC6) trigger, so go figure. Sure sounds odd about those sticky stock screws. :confused::confused:
 

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Sorry to hear of your Ruger troubles. The half dozen or so in my vaults are all tuned and good shooters. As above, it may take some shooting to lap the bore. A lapping kit might improve things more quickly.

A tight middle screw will cause receiver binding. It should only be tight enough to hole the trigger guard/floor plate in proper alignment to permit correct functioning of the floor plate release button.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
We have a Mark 2 in 06 . the trigger was polished up by our gunsmith when we got the rifle . You really do not have to replace it .
As far as grouping , a lot of new rifles take a hundred rounds or so to show what they are going to do. I have had a few that have done just that .
Yep, that is what the gunshop owner told me. He said they could polish it up, but I decided to go ahead and install a Timney trigger instead. As far as the grouping is concerned, it does take a number of rounds to "smooth out" the barrel and condition it. As soon as I have the trigger replacement I believe the accuracy will also improve. A 7 pound trigger pull is WAY too much for a 7 3/4 pound rifle.:) At 50 yards the Ruger made close groups of < than .50", so I am sure the Ruger will be okay.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The triggers on the MKII and Hawkeye M77s are of different design, with the new LC6 trigger being in the Hawkeye as already mentioned. I own Rugers from all phases, original tang safety, MKII and Hawkeye and the triggers do vary a good bit in performance. The best one I have is a NIB older tang safety model in .284 Win I bought about a year ago (1984 gun), very nice trigger. Second best is one of my two Hawkeyes, a .338 Fed. The other Hawkeye in .358Win has a terrible (LC6) trigger, so go figure. Sure sounds odd about those sticky stock screws. :confused::confused:
YES, I don't think their LC6 trigger is the best trigger around. I am also still puzzled about the three screws being like they were "glued" to where they were impossible for me to remove.:confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Sorry to hear of your Ruger troubles. The half dozen or so in my vaults are all tuned and good shooters. As above, it may take some shooting to lap the bore. A lapping kit might improve things more quickly.

A tight middle screw will cause receiver binding. It should only be tight enough to hole the trigger guard/floor plate in proper alignment to permit correct functioning of the floor plate release button.
Thanks! :) I am 100% certain my Ultra Light Ruger will be a good shooter, so I am not worried about it. I have fired it over 70 time since I bought it and there is no copper fouling at all!! The bore is very smooth and the bedding is fine too & the bolt is smooth in operation. Like I mentioned, in the above post that the screws being difficult to remove or loosen is a mystery & I am puzzled as to why they were "Glued" in. Also a 7 pound trigger pull is a bit too heavy for a rifle that weighs 7 3/4 pounds. I once had the older Ruger Model 77 in .30-06, with the tang safety, and the trigger was adjustable they should have kept the adjustable trigger in their current Model 77's. IMHO.
 

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when the first of the LC6 Triggers hit the market on the later model Mark II's and the new Hawkeyes they were advertiesed as a step up in performance and to be around a 4lb pull. i wonder what happened that they are coming out so heavy now?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
when the first of the LC6 Triggers hit the market on the later model Mark II's and the new Hawkeyes they were advertiesed as a step up in performance and to be around a 4lb pull. i wonder what happened that they are coming out so heavy now?
Good Question. :confused:
 

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I've got the same problem with my Hawkeye SS in 308. The LC6 feels like you're breaking limbs off a redwood tree with your little finger. I just received a new lighter trigger spring from ErnieTheGunsmith to be installed tomorrow. Lots of shooting and some slimy oil on the sear may help. When you get your Timney installed would you please post the model number? I haven't found one listed for the LC6.

As far as accuracy is concerned, mine was a loser out of the box. I tried NATO surplus from DAG 93 and some Winchester overrun from last year. They shot in the 4MOA area. Some handloads with 130gr Hornady are now approaching 1.5MOA with more improvement expected.

My mounting screws were also extremely tight. I got a Husky straight/tee handle from Home Depot and some large bits to break it loose. Now the front and back are tight and the middle snug. I'm also going to try some brass shims, 0.020", under the front and back mounts to float the barrel a bit.

It's been way too hot here in FL to do much shooting so I don't know if my improvements will work yet.
 

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I sure hope things will improve. Generally reports have been good about the Hawkeye. I don't own one yet, but my Creedmoor has the LC6 trigger. All I could think of what a dumb thing to name a trigger, but whatever. Ruger's are super easy to tune with a clicky pen spring and a light buffing on the sear if you desire.
 

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When you get your Timney installed would you please post the model number? I haven't found one listed for the LC6.
i was under the impression that the LC6 trigger was just a refined mark II trigger with a better finish on the bearing surfaces and a bit wider trigger but used the same sear set up. basicly doing at the factory what most have a smith do but make the trigger a tad wider for better/easier pull. am i wrong here??
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
i was under the impression that the LC6 trigger was just a refined mark II trigger with a better finish on the bearing surfaces and a bit wider trigger but used the same sear set up. basicly doing at the factory what most have a smith do but make the trigger a tad wider for better/easier pull. am i wrong here??
I believe LC6 Trigger works okay with the heavier Ruger M-77 Hawkeye's. On their Ultra Light Rifles the LC6 is too heavy, regarding trigger pull.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I've got the same problem with my Hawkeye SS in 308. The LC6 feels like you're breaking limbs off a redwood tree with your little finger. I just received a new lighter trigger spring from ErnieTheGunsmith to be installed tomorrow. Lots of shooting and some slimy oil on the sear may help. When you get your Timney installed would you please post the model number? I haven't found one listed for the LC6.

I'll let you know what model number the Timney is..

As far as accuracy is concerned, mine was a loser out of the box. I tried NATO surplus from DAG 93 and some Winchester overrun from last year. They shot in the 4MOA area. Some handloads with 130gr Hornady are now approaching 1.5MOA with more improvement expected.

The Ruger Hawkeye's in .308 all have a twist rate of 1-in-10" which should be fine for the 150 grainer. The lack of reasonable accuracy I feel is in the trigger pull, at least for me.


My mounting screws were also extremely tight. I got a Husky straight/tee handle from Home Depot and some large bits to break it loose. Now the front and back are tight and the middle snug. I'm also going to try some brass shims, 0.020", under the front and back mounts to float the barrel a bit.

Instead of using the brass shims to float your barrel (assuming it their 22" regular barrel) you might want to try and use a piece of coarse sandpaper wrapped around a proper size wood dowel and remove just a little of the wood in the barrel channel. You may have to glassbed your rifle too. I had to glassbed my Ruger M-77 MKII in .270 which resulted in excellent accuracy.

It's been way too hot here in FL to do much shooting so I don't know if my improvements will work yet.

Been too rainy here in KY for any good testing also.:)
 

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i have a late production MK II in 300 win mag and when i was tuning it i found that it shot best with the front action screw as tight as i could possibly get it. i still have the targets around here somewhere that show the progress as the tourque was increased. i have the middle screw just tight enough that it'll do its job but not fall out and then the rear screw fairly tight but not as tight as the front one. shoots great! 1" groups with 180gr speers and 1/2" groups with 165gr barnes tsx bullets... i should also add that i made no moifications to the barrel channel or bedding area...
 

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Discussion Starter #18
i have a late production MK II in 300 win mag and when i was tuning it i found that it shot best with the front action screw as tight as i could possibly get it. i still have the targets around here somewhere that show the progress as the tourque was increased. i have the middle screw just tight enough that it'll do its job but not fall out and then the rear screw fairly tight but not as tight as the front one. shoots great! 1" groups with 180gr speers and 1/2" groups with 165gr barnes tsx bullets... i should also add that i made no moifications to the barrel channel or bedding area...
I agree with you on the middle screw inthat it should be snug and not overly tighten. Ruger says this in their instruction manual. The front and rear screws should be tight with the front being the tightest. Usually no stocks need no modifications if the action is properly bedded. HOWEVER I am still "Puzzled" as to why my rifle's three screws were like they were "glued" in.:confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Found This on the LC6 Trigger

Ruger LC6 Trigger

The Ruger trigger supplied in the M77 Mark II was a big step backward from the very good trigger mechanism used in the original M77. The Mark II trigger is creepy, heavy and not user adjustable. (It can be lightened by removing the trigger return spring and clipping off one link, but that is hardly "user adjustable" by normal standards and the excessive creep remains.) The Ruger M77 is a very popular hunting rifle, and generally deserves to be, but its trigger has been widely and justifiably criticized. The usual solution for M77 Mark II owners is to replace the stock trigger assembly with an aftermarket trigger.


Ruger LC6 Trigger. Illustration courtesy of Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc.
For years, Ruger refused to budge on the trigger issue, despite all the criticism the Mark II trigger received from practically everyone who owned one, including the reviewers at Guns and Shooting Online. However, the pressure from the AccuTrigger and other "improved" triggers made some improvement of the Mark II trigger necessary if the M77 rifle was to remain competitive in the marketplace.

This was accomplished with the introduction of the M77 Hawkeye rifle, which incorporates the LC6 trigger mechanism. The LC6 is derived from the Mark II trigger with some internal and manufacturing improvements. Ruger advertises "smooth, crisp performance right out of the box." Guns and Shooting Online reviewed an early Hawkeye rifle and found the trigger to be even worse than the last M77 Mark II we had reviewed, creepy, gritty and heavy. The LC6 triggers that I tried at the 2008 SHOT Show were considerably better than the example in our test rifle. Either they were specially tuned for the SHOT Show or Ruger has improved their quality control. However, the LC6 is not user adjustable, is set for a (too heavy) nominal five pound pull at the factory and remains clearly inferior to the original M77 trigger as well as the Savage AccuTrigger and the new triggers from Browning, Marlin and Winchester. This is a shame, as anyone who has owned an original M77 knows that Ruger is perfectly capable of producing a good, adjustable trigger should they choose to do so.

http://www.chuckhawks.com/hunting_rifle_triggers.htm
 

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yes the adhesive does seem odd! as for the trigger i have found that it is sooo super simple to stone and lighten that it's not a big issue to me.
 
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