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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I plan on buying myself a carry weapon and one that I can have fun with shooting off some rounds and the range. I was considering the Kimber Grand Raptor or Warrior but im reading alot of goods and bads on these pistols.

Im new here and im pretty new to pistols (never personally owned one before and only shot a few rounds off in my life) so not sure what to get first. I was also thinking of getting a Glock 17 to start out with because i've heard it is hard to beat durabilty and functionality wise. Plus its cost is like $500 less.

There is a outdoor shooting range 10 min drive from my house so being able to practice with it shouldnt be a problem. I also plan to carry the pistol. I already turned in the application for a license a couple days ago.

I love the way the Grand Raptor looks but im scared ill get stuck with a lemon and since I have very little knowledge of pistols and how they work I wouldnt know how to fix the problem or know if I just have a plan ol dud.

Anyway id love to hear any suggestions or ideas on this.

Thanks Larry
 

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Welcome to the forum.

You might take a look at Para-ordance's light double action in a carry sized gun. I was really impressed by the trigger on this gun and they seem to have a good reputation for keeping working.

If you havn't much experience with a pistol you might want to think about getting an accurate 22 lr. To become accurate with a pistol you need to practice and any of the big bore's cost a bunch to do that with and the noise and recoil do not aid in learning to shoot.

Ruger makes a nice accurate semi-auto with the same grip angle as most of the 45 cal pistols. You can shoot 500 rounds for around ten bucks. Carry this on to shooting the big bore and you end up with the capability to really control most situations you need a handgun for.

Lots of folks I know like the glocks, our state prison system just turned over to them a couple of years ago. I just am to old for the plastic and polygon riflling though.

You can't beat a 45 for interrupting a bad guys day.
 

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A carry pistol and a fun shooting pistol may be two different things.Do you plan to carry on body or some type of pack? Hot weather or cold? The way you carry should determine what you buy. I learned the hard way,by loosing money trading until I found one right for me.If you know anyone that carrys every day concealed ask their advise.Then ask to see their weapon ,if it is in the car or house forget their advise.Tell me more about your intended carry method and I will try to be of some help.
 

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Gents,

I am the proud owner of one glock (19) and two Kimber 1911s, (one 45, one 10mm). I reckon that if there are any extremes in the auto pistol range, these two are pretty much on opposite ends.

The glock is a fine, serviceable gun whose true strength has to do with its durability. It will shoot straight enough, is easy to learn, and you will be hard pressed to wear it out. I admit that I have little pride in ownership in mine, it is a tool, pure and simple, and spends most of its time in the glovebox of my truck. I do carry it now and again, because it is so light, and it is always handy.

THe Kimbers are beautifully made, and match accurate. They have incorporated all of the custom attachments of a 1911, and are relatively affordable for what they provide. I have found mine to be quite reliable, but it does like some loads better than others. 1911s are easy to shoot straight, but are more demanding in terms of safe gun handling, and require allot of practice, and I would recommend some professional instruction if this is the way you decided to go.

If I knew I was going to a contentious AO, and had to pick one or the other, I would take the Kimber, for no other reason that I shoot that one much straighter than the Glock.

I would look real hard at what you wanted a pistol to do, and then one of these fine guns will be more suited to your circumstances. I am sure that either will serve you well.

Good shooting, friend.

Steve
 

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For a new guy The Glock 17 would be a better starting out gun. Less recoil to contend with and it is less fussy about ammo than the 45. There is also a difference in ammo cost. You can find 9mm cheap. If you are going to use it for a carry gun then I would recommend the Glock 19. Its a little smaller and about the right size for an effective carry gun. I use a Glock 26 for a daily carry gun but would rather have the 19. I used the 26 as a backup for my duty 17 many years ago.
The 26 or 27 Glock is probably the best carry gun because of its size and performance. I have carried the 26 since they came out and sometimes I have to check to see if its still there. The McDanial II holster fro Andrews Custom Leather will make a 26 or 19 just about dissapear under a tshirt. One other thing: You should probably get some training before you start shooting. Just my .02.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Bogart said:
.Tell me more about your intended carry method and I will try to be of some help.

I plan to carry all the time that I am able. With the way I work I can't keep it on me (Cable Installer) going in and out of peoples homes. So i'll have to leave it in the glove box or under my seat. Having a pistol where you cant get to it doesnt server alot of purpose IMO. I would love to have an accurate pistol because IF the time ever came up that I had to use it on someone I wouldnt want it to not work ya know.

And honestly I do want a gun that is nice looking. Which is another reason i liked the Grand Raptor.

More than likely though, i'll probably end up with 2 guns. A 9mm to practice with and a .45 to carry.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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You got it half right. There is no point in buying a 9mm to practice with, however. If you want an accurate pistol, no offense, you need to be an accurate shooter first. That means practice, practice, and more practice! Did I mention lots of practice????

You would really do yourself a disservice if you start with anything but a .22 rimfire.

Buy one used if necessary, put a couple of bricks of ammo through it and you can probably get 90% of your money back, if you decide to sell it when you move up to centerfire. But odds are you'll end up keeping it.

For a gun that will be left in a vehicle, you need rust resistance, and to not be too terribly attached to it, if it gets stolen.

Good luck and welcome to the forum.
 

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I guess I'll jump in here and add my 2 cents. My other job (part time fun job) is serving as a range officer at the local indoor shooting range. I also shoot IDPA competition and have noticed the majority of the people who carry concealed are either 1911 die-hards or Glock die-hards. A few of us use both. I've always been a 1911 guy and carry a Les Baer Stinger Stainless because the commander size slide and officer size grip conceals better for me. I do carry a Glock 36 (slim-line .45 ACP) if air travel is involved. I figure if someone is going to steal a handgun out of my suitcase, it will be less of a loss if it is the Glock. However, I think it is best to practice with, plink with, and carry the same weapon. Familiarity is a good thing. When drawing from concealment in a timed situation using the Glock, I find my thumb going for the thumb safety that is so familiar on my Stinger. That being said, in competition when stress levels are a little high, I see very few malfunctions with well tuned 1911s and Glocks. My wife carries a Glock 27 and is very happy (and proficient)with it and it has been 100% reliable. The Glock may be your best choice because you will be carrying it in your glove box and leaving it in the vehicle. I wouldn't want to lose or beat up a nice Kimber. However, if you decide on the Glock, you might consider getting it in .45 ACP. Just my opinion. :)
 

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Opiy said:
I love the way the Grand Raptor looks but im scared ill get stuck with a lemon and since I have very little knowledge of pistols and how they work I wouldnt know how to fix the problem or know if I just have a plan ol dud./QUOTE]Larry, it is HIGHLY unlikely that a Kimber will turn out to be a lemon. In the event that something did happen, Kimber will be there to fix it. I just love the look of machined, polished steel and beautifully checkered hardwoods. I respect the Glocks as they shoot straight and keep working under any conditions. They just don't have the same look as a Kimber but it does everything that you ask of it. Since you're relatively new to handguns, the guys have given you some excellent advice. Start off with a .22 and practice, practice, practice. When you get proficient, move up to the centerfires. A lot of bad habits are picked up such as flinching when a new shooter starts off with too much gun. You'll learn faster and shoot much better with less cost if you start off with the .22. Some people don't think much of the .22 because of it's size but it is a highly accurate bullet out to 50 yards and beyond and it's been known to kill some very large animals when placed correctly. The only thing it lacks is the recoil, something a newer shooter can do without. :)
 

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I think the 22 pistol first is a must to learn with and then move up to a bigger centrfire. There are some nice 22 pistols on the market now Ruger, Walther, S&W just to name a few.The ammo is very cheap and you you can shoot till the cows come home. As for the Kimber and Glock hands down the Kimber it will be money well spent.

Hoeram :D
 

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ironhead7544 said:
You can also get a 22 kit for the Glock or Kimber.
Sounds like the best of both worlds!! I personaly would go Kimber and the 22 conversion. You would be learnig with with the 22 kit . That way as you learn you would be totaly proficent with the function of the pistol before moving to the 45
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I like the idea of the conversion kit also. Anyone ever use one though? Do they work good? I think they are around $280 for the Kimbers.
 

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I've got one of the Kimber-branded .22 uppers for my, well, Kimber (surprise) !

They are fun to shoot but in all honesty it actually will cost more than a used Ruger Mark II .22.

Pay your money and take your chances.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I think i'll end up having more than one pistol now after doing some research and asking your help : )

Get a glock for practice shooting since they seem to be very durable and pretty low cost and a Nice 1911 .45 to carry.
 

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Opiy I am sorry I took so long to reply. For myself the full size 1911 is too large and heavy to carry concealed on my body during an Alabama summer. Under a jacket or in a proper pack I love it. I carry a Glock 36 every day where legal,in an inside waist band holster.The sub compact and midsize Glocks are comfortable and concealible. I would recomend something with a longer double action triger or safety for someone new to concealing a weapon on their body.If you really want the Kimber buy it I think a 1911 is the most fun to shoot and show your friends. For carrying on the body and safety it is hard to beat a S&W Airweight J-frame .38.
 

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Another thing to consider is, if you wear your pistol every day, or at least leave it in a holster every day, it will wear the finish. If you want a pretty gun, it usually won't stay pretty long. Granted the finish wear won't affect the frunctionality of the gun. Also, I think a Glock would be lighter to carry than a full size Kimber.

Of course, if you look at my collection, you won't see a Glock, you'd see a couple Sigs, a browning buckmark, a S&W, and a Kimber, all of which are good guns, but I, myself, do not carry concealed and that has a factor on my collection. If I did conceal carry I might consider a Glock, or another Sig.

Of course, the price of a Kimber Warrior, you can get a Glock or Sig ( ;) ) and a quality .22lr, I would suggest a Buckmark.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Im pretty sure ive made up my mind so far : )

Im just going to get the Glock 19 to start out with. While I practice and play with it i'll keep researching the 1911s and see what I want to do. It will also give me time to save.

Im now checking out some of the Wilson Pistols now. Looking at the cost on their website thought $3000+ i dunno. I do want to get a good one that will be there for me and last a long time without being a problem in maintenance and also pretty accurate.
 

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Kimber makes a good 1911. The problems you mostly hear about the Kimbers deal with the external extractor and the firing pin safety. The Kimber II series utilize the firing pin safety and since 2004(?) use the external extractor.

The Warrior, is Kimber going back to the original Kimber design, before they started adding safety features and external extractor and what not. From what I've read this is a very good pistol. I would suggest going to 1911forum.com and reading in the gun manufacturer sections you are interested in. ***disregard, I just noticed your post in the Kimber section of 1911forum***

I have a Kimber TLE II with an internal extractor and it has worked perfectly every time...so far.
 

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I have the Kimber 1911 45acp with the Kimber made 22 upper ( they do make their own 22 conversion) it is the best of both worlds you can practice and carry the same piece.
 
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