Shooters Forum banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,862 Posts
I would leave it alone. That's bayonet practice damage caused by flexing the fore-end. It doesn't affect accuracy or strength, only looks. It can look like a crack or look like glue in a crack, but its never going to look whole unless you take the rifle apart so you can clamp the entire fore-end at right angles to the crack. Get the clamping arranged for a quick application, squirt in thin super glue like found in a hobby shop and clamp it an leave it an hour or two. The crack is clean enough to look really good.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ghale01

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I would leave it alone. That's bayonet practice damage caused by flexing the fore-end. It doesn't affect accuracy or strength, only looks. It can look like a crack or look like glue in a crack, but its never going to look whole unless you take the rifle apart so you can clamp the entire fore-end at right angles to the crack. Get the clamping arranged for a quick application, squirt in thin super glue like found in a hobby shop and clamp it an leave it an hour or two. The crack is clean enough to look really good.
You think me shooting it wouldn’t cause the crack to become worse? That’s the thing that worries me.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
540 Posts
How’d you do it?
This 722 I bought for this 12 year old Grandson(1st gun show for him) had a crack that followed the grain from the rear of the forearm spiraling through the wrist into the Butt stock. I didn't find it but Logans Parental Grandpa did so I twisted the stock opening the crack and he applied the Super glue.
I opened and closed the crack a couple times, a quick whipe with a moist cloth and let it sit overnight.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,862 Posts
That particular crack is in a place not affected by recoil....If I'm seeing the rear sight in the picture. It takes no stress unless you're practicing butt strokes.
There seems to be a moving part just behind the crack. Take it apart and be sure that part didn't cause the crack. If it did, relieve it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That particular crack is in a place not affected by recoil....If I'm seeing the rear sight in the picture. It takes no stress unless you're practicing butt strokes.
That is the rear sight. I do not practice butt strokes. Seems to me that it’ll be fine and shouldn’t have to necessarily be repaired
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,405 Posts
Use some stretchy Self Adherent Tape or those blue rubber bands they take your blood with. Surgical tubing is harder to find these days. Use either of those to pull the stock together once glued. I like carpenters wood glue for most wood jobs.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ghale01

·
The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
Joined
·
24,196 Posts
Please find the most appropriate forum to place your thread rather than just dumping everything into the General Discussion forum. We grow weary moving things for the proper format. Thank you.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Darkker

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,862 Posts
I'll explain my 'clamp' instead of elastic bands--- The crack is on one side of a barrel channel. The only way to apply pressure against the crack is by applying pressure straight down. Elastic will bend it inward.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Im2Tall2Play2!

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,405 Posts
I'll explain my 'clamp' instead of elastic bands--- The crack is on one side of a barrel channel. The only way to apply pressure against the crack is by applying pressure straight down. Elastic will bend it inward.
I would think that stretchy stuff might work better as the pressure is evenly applied. I have had to use clamps in certain circumstances though. I will defer to your experience.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,862 Posts
The pressure is applied evenly towards the middle of the encirclement. That bends the limber part at the top towards the middle instead of straight down against the part it split from. :)
I used a modified vise grip in the Army for cracked M-14 stocks but no glue. The stock was clamped closed then drilled through the crack and a small threaded brass repair rod was screwed in by a Yankee drill. Since all military stocks are quarter sawn, the pins always came in from top or bottom and did a good job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Just my 2 cents....

Titebond III glue using an injector to fill the crack with as much glue as you can. Warm, wet sponge to wipe away excess. Leave alone for 24 hours to be certain. This will stop the crack from spreading further under recoil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Just my 2 cents....

Titebond III glue using an injector to fill the crack with as much glue as you can. Warm, wet sponge to wipe away excess. Leave alone for 24 hours to be certain. This will stop the crack from spreading further under recoil.
I think the crack may have previously been repaired by using a epoxy. Whenever I try to lift up the piece of wood above the split, the wood barely budges. Do you think it’ll be fine?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,862 Posts
It will be fine. There is no recoil absorption in that area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: Pudfark

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
Titebond or any good carpenters PVA glue will glue it stronger than the wood around it. Cracks are one of my favorite repairs as long as it's not oil soaked it will never crack in the same spot again. Don't ever use metal pins or screws or anything like that. Modern glues are incredibly strong. Just wipe off any excess before it dries. Once it dries it's very hard to get the excess off without sanding. You don't want to change the appearance of it. If done carefully it's almost impossible to see the glue crack.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top