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Discussion Starter #1
I'd like to get your guys thoughts on something. I'm full length resizing my 30-06 brass. However, I'm holding the shoulder setback to a measured .003 from the fired case. That seems To guarantee easy feeding and minimal case stretching.

However.... I'm not so sure this is the best way. I don't want to go to neck sizing yet so that's not on the table. Mostly I'm asking about moving the shoulder. Do you think I'm good to go or should I not set the shoulder back at all? It makes the bolt a bit harder to close but that's all so far. I'm trying to end up with minimimal case stretch and maximum reliability (for practice ammo). Your thoughts?

Thanks.
 

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Remember, rimless cases like the .30-06 headspace on the shoulder area. Movinng the shoulder back can cause your primers to back out slightly, on firing, or the cartridge might slip too far into the chamber and misfire.
 

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You don't mention what type of action your '06 is chambered in, but .003" is more than you want, if it's a bolt-action. It's a bit excessive even for a semi-auto, unless you know rounds won't cycle well unless your case shoulders are pushed back that much.

In a nutshell: You want to resize the case as little as possible and still have it chamber freely. For best accuracy in a bolt-action, a lot of guys like the bolt to close just a little bit hard, resulting in a crush-fit of the case in the chamber. Your goals may be different but you really don't want to move the shoulder back at all, if you can get away with it..
 

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In a nutshell: You want to resize the case as little as possible and still have it chamber freely. For best accuracy in a bolt-action, a lot of guys like the bolt to close just a little bit hard, resulting in a crush-fit of the case in the chamber. Your goals may be different but you really don't want to move the shoulder back at all, if you can get away with it..
CORRECT!! I once had a Ruger Model 77 bolt action chambered for the 7.62 X 39 m/m and "neck sized" all my cases for this rifle, especally when I used .308" dia. bullets. Results were better accuracy & NO misfires, or backed-out primers. I could use .310" which were factory loads but always just neck sized only.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You don't mention what type of action your '06 is chambered in, but .003" is more than you want, if it's a bolt-action. It's a bit excessive even for a semi-auto, unless you know rounds won't cycle well unless your case shoulders are pushed back that much.

In a nutshell: You want to resize the case as little as possible and still have it chamber freely. For best accuracy in a bolt-action, a lot of guys like the bolt to close just a little bit hard, resulting in a crush-fit of the case in the chamber. Your goals may be different but you really don't want to move the shoulder back at all, if you can get away with it..

It is a bolt action. Ruger Hawkeye to be specific.
 

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Bill I set mine back 0.002" and don't have any trouble. Gave up neck sizing when I discovered that the f/l sizing left the cases much more concentric.

Winchester model 70, by the way. Same process works in an old mauser with a JC Higgins barrel.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks guys. I use an RCBS Precision Mike to measure the shoulder so this is not a guess or estimate. Mike, it sounds like you are doing something similar. Thanks to you and everybody for your imput. I'll try to refine down to .002 and go with that.

BTW... Brand new WW brass has about .008 headspace for the first firing. And yes, most most case stretch is in the first firing.
 

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Something I learned back in the 60s or early 70s was to NOT, I REPEAT, NOT!!!!!!!!!!!!
follow the manufactures directions for setting up a "full length" sizing die.

Do not bring the die down to touch the shell holder or allow the ram to pop over center as indicated by some of the printed directions.

Always set the die down only enough to assure relyable chambering and closing of the action.

After a few firings, you may need to tweak the die down just enough to again assure relyable chambering, and possibly do this process again if the rounds show a bit of resistance to closing the action.

However, you will soon arrive at the optimum setting for your full length die in combination with your firearms chamber and in doing so will maximize brass life and reload consistancy.

Following the manufactures directions for die set up, can put brass life in the pits due to over sizing/working.

All chambers and dies, should be reamed within "manufacturing tolerences," which means there is a possible and likely slight veration from die to die and chamber to chamber.

Therefore, if you happen to have a chamber on the large side of the allowed tolerences and a die on the small side, following manufactures die setup directions causes rapid over working of brass and short life.

If everything was perfect, this would not be an issue, but with the normal state of things this problem is a real possibility. Been there and done that.

Keep em coming!

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I was just reading in the Speer reloading book that they suggest using the RCBS Precision Mike and setting the shoulder back .002 just as Mike G is doing. This may not be real clear unless you use one of their precision mike's. They do give a great and repeatable control over the case shoulder. Speer also points out that for hunting grade ammo the cases should be full length resized (shoulder clearance around .006 or so) to allow for dirt, ice or whatever might block the cartridge in the chamber. Same as the way factory ammo is spec'd.

It's been an interesting thread guys. Thanks!
 

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Yes, the techs will recommend full length sizing, but the facts remain that sizing the minimum amount which allows for consistant and smooth chambering is optimum.

Now, if you were to take some of my 300win mag ammo, loaded for my 300win mag., it may not chamber or function in your 300win mag.

BUT the point is, in this case the ammo WAS loaded for MY 300 and not yours and is therefore NOT optimum in your rifle.

Remember, as smart and well educated as the Speer techs are, they are also part of the RCBS etc. family and as such must follow the guidelines which do not counter anything said by the brother companies.

However, experience as a reloader comes into play here and as long as safety guidelines remain in place and adheard to, part of this great pass time is learning when or if to take a road not found in the "official" publications or official company position.

The official word will produce usable/safe ammo in almost all firearms, but it may or may not be optimum in all firearms when it comes to consistancy and proformance.

Keep em coming!

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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+1 on that

Yes, the techs will recommend full length sizing, but the facts remain that sizing the minimum amount which allows for consistant and smooth chambering is optimum.

Now, if you were to take some of my 300win mag ammo, loaded for my 300win mag., it may not chamber or function in your 300win mag.

BUT the point is, in this case the ammo WAS loaded for MY 300 and not yours and is therefore NOT optimum in your rifle.

Remember, as smart and well educated as the Speer techs are, they are also part of the RCBS etc. family and as such must follow the guidelines which do not counter anything said by the brother companies.

However, experience as a reloader comes into play here and as long as safety guidelines remain in place and adheard to, part of this great pass time is learning when or if to take a road not found in the "official" publications or official company position.

The official word will produce usable/safe ammo in almost all firearms, but it may or may not be optimum in all firearms when it comes to consistancy and proformance.

Keep em coming!

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
I agree 100% . Forget the measurement , size to your chamber and it's done.
 
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