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I have a Win. Model 94, made in the 1940's, it shoots quite low. Should the rear sight be RAISED to make POI higher? I understand the FORS thing (front opposite rear same) but does that apply to rear sight windage & not elevation? Anyway, tell me what/how to move rear sight elevation, thanks.
 

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Yes. Raise the rear sight to raise the bullet POI.
But no need to trust me - draw a little picture of the relationship of the front sight, rear sight, and target, and it'll make perfect sense and you can answer it for yourself!

Enjoy that nice old rifle,
Rex
 

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Always move the rear sight in the direction you want the POI to go. Opposite for the front sight.
 

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He's shooting an 80 year-old M94 with iron sights. That video is pretty irrelevant. Not that a similar procedure can't help "get on paper" with iron sights as well, but he's already "on paper."

But if he was to try to use that procedure, once he got the rifle fixed in the vise, and somehow figured out how to use a mirror, or remove the bolt so he could sight through the barrel and center it on the spot on the wall, the rear sight would need to be RAISED to make the sights line up.
 

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I have a Win. Model 94, made in the 1940's, it shoots quite low. Should the rear sight be RAISED to make POI higher? I understand the FORS thing (front opposite rear same) but does that apply to rear sight windage & not elevation? Anyway, tell me what/how to move rear sight elevation, thanks.
Mr. Chili Powder,
If you will post the distance between your front and rear sight, the range to your target, and how far low the rifle is hitting, I (or anyone - you too) can calculate exactly how much you rear sight needs to be raised to put your rounds right on target. It's just simple math.

Brownells has an online calculator to do it as well.
https://www.brownells.com/aspx/learn/learndetail.aspx?lid=13093
That ought to do it.
Rex
 

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Back in the 1960's a gunsmith showed me how to sight in an rifle like the Win 94. He did it with a 22RF out his back door. He shot at a target about ten feet away. He said something like at 10' it would be pretty bad if you couldn't hit the paper. Adjust it there then move out farther. Trick to zeroing at 100yds is to hit the target to know what you need the do. With a scope on the rifle, I fire the first round then with the scope set on the original aiming point, I move the cross wires to the bullet hole. You'll be on the paper but low then at 100yds. Re-establish the hold again and move the cross wires to the bullet hole. Zeroed in two shots!
 

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Yes, raise the rear sight to get POI up. Think about it: after you raise the rear sight you will have to raise the muzzle to align front/rear sights and bulls eye- hence
POI will be higher.
 

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Brownells makes or used to make plastic front sights that you could attack and it had section that you cut/clip off until your POI came to chosen zero. Measure them and order a proper front sight..They came in packages of 12..I used them a lot and saved them for future use btw..It is more accurate than calculation.

If they don't have them anymore and I don't see them in my new catalog your could ure a match stick or tooth pick. what ever, glued in the dovetail and do the same thing.
 

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There are a number of ways to zero a rifle. The easiest way I have found is to put a can out at the 100 yard berm. Have a spotter watch and tell me where I am hitting. When I adjust and get close, I switch to paper.
 

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I have a 30-30 that shoots so far low and right I think the barrel must be bent. It'll take a little bit of fidlin' to confirm that, but I'm looking at a 7-30 Waters or 25-35 barrel for it anyway.
 

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Set up a large target at 20 yards.

A sheet of computer paper on a safe backing, with a sharpie bullseye in center is ok.

Fire your 94 Winchester at the center of the target. find the bullet hole and make it the new target by making it large with your sharpie. Adjust your rear sight up or down until your sights are pointed directly at the second target you marked (the one with the bullet hole in it).

Fire another round to at the original marked target to confirm where you are hitting.

Note, for the 94, at very close range, you should be hitting about an inch low in order to be dead on at 100 yards.

For the 30-30, I would prefer to be dead on at about 150 yards, and the 94 will be able to shoot accrately at deer sized targets out to 225 yards without hold over.

Often, hunters attempting to do "Kentucky windage hold overs" at longer range targets will outsmart themselves and miss. I've done it. I recommend keeping the sights on the animal when shooting.
 

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A sheet of computer paper on a safe backing, with a sharpie bullseye in center is ok.

Fire your 94 Winchester at the center of the target. find the bullet hole and make it the new target by making it large with your sharpie. Adjust your rear sight up or down until your sights are pointed directly at the second target you marked (the one with the bullet hole in it).

Fire another round to at the original marked target to confirm where you are hitting.

Note, for the 94, at very close range, you should be hitting about an inch low in order to be dead on at 100 yards.

For the 30-30, I would prefer to be dead on at about 150 yards, and the 94 will be able to shoot accrately at deer sized targets out to 225 yards without hold over.

Often, hunters attempting to do "Kentucky windage hold overs" at longer range targets will outsmart themselves and miss. I've done it. I recommend keeping the sights on the animal when shooting.
Dave, did you leave out a step where you somehow fix the rifle in a vise before making the sight adjustment to the "new" target established by the impact of your first shot? How exactly would one do what you're describing?
Thanks,
Rex
 

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Back in the 1960's a gunsmith showed me how to sight in an rifle like the Win 94. He did it with a 22RF out his back door. He shot at a target about ten feet away. He said something like at 10' it would be pretty bad if you couldn't hit the paper. Adjust it there then move out farther. Trick to zeroing at 100yds is to hit the target to know what you need the do. With a scope on the rifle, I fire the first round then with the scope set on the original aiming point, I move the cross wires to the bullet hole. You'll be on the paper but low then at 100yds. Re-establish the hold again and move the cross wires to the bullet hole. Zeroed in two shots!
Learned this from Jack O’Connor’s “THE RIFLE BOOK” or “THE COMPLETE BOOK OF RIFLES AND SHOTGUNS” back in the 60s.
 

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Yes, some sort of vise or steady rest will help.

Dave, did you leave out a step where you somehow fix the rifle in a vise before making the sight adjustment to the "new" target established by the impact of your first shot? How exactly would one do what you're describing?
Thanks,
Rex
When sighting-in, I use an adjustable Caldwell bench rest, and I have a wooden wedge wrapped in duct tape to hold the rifle steady. A vise, or maybe a Lead Sled or some kind of rest to hold the rifle in place.

Good point. It would be difficult to do this without some sort of rest to hold the rifle in place.
 

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When sighting-in, I use an adjustable Caldwell bench rest, and I have a wooden wedge wrapped in duct tape to hold the rifle steady. A vise, or maybe a Lead Sled or some kind of rest to hold the rifle in place.

Good point. It would be difficult to do this without some sort of rest to hold the rifle in place.
Yes, it's far easier to measure the amount the POI needs to change, do the very simple math to determine how much the sights need to be moved, then you can just clamp the rifle in a fixed vise and move the sights by the amount needed.
Cheers,
Rex
 
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