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Discussion Starter #1
Just how do I go about holding my bee-u-t-ful new Redhawk in a standard vice without marring the barrel, frame etc?  What/how do you folks accomplish this task?

Marshall, it's probably in my Technical Guide and I'm just not seeing it.

Blessings,

Alan
 

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Alan,

The best thing to do is to cut some soft wood, pine works well, and place these pieces between the deadly jaws of the vice and your new smokewagon. Snug the vise up tight so the grip frame of your revolver presses into the wood and the vise gets a good grip. Grab the barrel and give it a good shake make certain nothings going to come loose.

Make sure that the wood is generously cut and wider than steel its covering so a slip of the hammer doesn't shift the gun into steel. I've also seen heavy carpet and leather used to cover the jaws as well, but I use the wood. Just go slow and watch that hamer.
 

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Alan,

Go to your local thrift store.... Goodwill, Salvation Army etc.   Buy a well used (read cheap) baseball glove.   It will provide all the padding necessary for protecting your new Redhawk, and at the same time, the leather grips without slipping in your vice.   If it does slip a little, add a little pine pitch to the leather of the ball glove and it will grip like no tomorrow and positively will not slip.

Quick, cheap and versatile!

God Bless,

Marshall
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You guys are the best - thank you!

A "rough" measurement of my cylinder throats show the buggers measuring at .450/.451.  It may take me awhile to build up the nerve to ream the throats by myownself.  If something can go wrong, I'm guaranteed to find that something :biggrin:
 

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Alan, Stillwell Tool and Die lists this service on their website at &#3645. Someone else posted a link on here,IIRC.
<a href="http://rstillwe.home.texas.net/stdprice.htm

(Edited" target="_blank">http://rstillwe.home.texas.net/stdprice.htm

(Edited</a> by RugerNo3 at 8:17 am on Mar. 31, 2001)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Aaaaaarrrrrghhhhhhhh!  I HATE MURPHY!!!!

Sorry but the ol' blood pressure is high.  What could I have possibly done, while slugging my cylinders, to cause the cylinder to bind up when closing the cylinder back into the frame?  On the throat side of the cylinder face, the ejecter rod assembly (fixed piece of metal right in front of the cylinder throat face) now barely touches the the inside of the frame when closing the cylinder - metal to metal contact.  Once it's closed, it seems the cylinder functions normally.  I am afraid to shoot the bugger as is so tomorrow's christening is off  :^(

Suggestions??

Alan - have new gun but can't shoot it - Ransom
 

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Alan, please tell me you removed the cylinder from the gun before you slugged it.

You may just need to remove the cylinder and reinstall it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
"please tell me you removed the cylinder from the gun before you slugged it. "

I guess this is where the fine line between ignorance and stupidity becomes blatantly recognizable.  MT - I didn't remove the cylinder - I didn't think the average Joe ( or the ignorant Alan) could remove the cylinder from a DA without special tools.  If this procedure can be explained at all via this forum, I would desperately like to try it.  
 

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Nobody told the man to remove the cylinder from the frame before he stared pounding lead through the chambers?? Shounds to me like the crane is bent!, James

(Edited by James Gates at 6:44 am on April 1, 2001)


(Edited by James Gates at 6:49 am on April 1, 2001)
 

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####! er Darn.

Alan! You never said in your first post what you wanted to hold the pistol for. I erroneously thought it was for cleaning or some such other task. I've watched this thread develop and didn't think otherwise so didn't jump in because I do exactly what MT does to hold the pistol.

The cylinder itself needed to be clamped and held to do something like slugging the cylinder.

I fear you may have done what Mr. Gates said. Somebody tell me this is an April fools joke.

Oh man, I have to go lie down now.


:cool: (smok'em if ya gott'em)




(Edited by Contender at 12:31 pm on April 1, 2001)
 

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Alan,

Man, I hate it when I assume. The title of the tread said "Slugging the Bore" and I assumed thats what you meant. I should have asked how you were going to slug the cylinders. I doubt my ability to instruct you how to disassemble your Redhawk via computer. Does the owners manual no longer give the instructions? The gun should go back to Ruger if the crane is bent.

This better not be an April Fools joke! Don't make me come over there!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
"This better not be an April Fools joke! Don't make me come over there!"

Gents - I sure wish it was!  Nope, the only fool is yours truly.  I made a poor assumption, per my interpretation of the instructions, that removing the cylinder, for a DA, meant swinging the cylinder out and leaving it on the crane assembly.  I still have a pit in my stomache for being so stupid.  Lesson learned.

MT - the disassembly schematic came with the revolver.  I'll view it carefully today.  On another forum, I read a post from a guy who had a cylinder on a S&W that was not spinning as freely as it should and several responders stated it was best to have a gunsmith remove/clean whatever was causing the cylinder spin problem.  The post emphasized disassembly of cylinder/crane was not for the newbie.

As for my Redhawk, I don't see any gaps where the crane and the frame meet once the cylinder is closed.  Long story short, visually, no bend is apparent.
 

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Alan,

While there are no gaps between the frame and crane arm, that's not the way the cylinder was being belted in. It was being impacted to the rear of the pistol.

It's possible the crane tube section that the cylinder rotates on, and that the ejecter rod is in, is bent itself. You mention that the ejector rod hits the frame. This might be what causes it. Just a thought. With the cylinder closed do you have a really big gap between the forcing cone and the cylinder face now?

I shoulda deduced from your thread title what you were doing also. This is what can happen with delayed, text based communication.

It may be a good idea to return it to the factory and let them have a look at it. They can check the timing and function among other things. Even if it functions with any damage, it might not shoot worth a hoot as far as accuracy is concerned. IMHO

Hey, I just made a stupid mistake with my reloading dies  and I've been reloading for 20+ years now. Chaulk it up to experience. We are ALL still learning.

Don't get down on yourself.


Regards


:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Morning all:

Contender -

The crane tube and the ejecter rod are as straight as an arrow, no wobble and no visible bend.  The rod and star assembly snap back easily after being depressed.  The cylinder/fc gap is very tight and uniform for all six cylinders.  I do not see the piece or its part name on the Redhawk parts schematic that is causing the frame to cylinder contact mentioned earlier.  This part is circular in shape and has a small slot cut into the top.  This piece is positioned in the center of the cylinder face; the ejecter rod goes through this piece and then it (ejecter rod) immediately goes into/through the center of the cylinder.  When the cylincer is closed, it is this circular piece that barely catches the corner of the frame (a tad bit lower where the upper right hand corner of the crane meets the frame - low and left of the forcing cone).

I slugged 3 of the six cylinders (.4502, grrrrr!) by placing the cylinder face on a firm wood surface with the cylinder hole in use not blocked by the wood surface.  I used a 3/8" hickory shaft and a standard framing hammer to push through a lubed #8 soft weight through well oiled (WD40) cylinders.  Only 1 of the three gave any indication of wanting to stick in the cylinder.  I thought life was good until I went to close the cylinder and ya'll know the rest of the story.

(Edited by Alan at 9:12 am on April 2, 2001)
 

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Alan...Just for the heck of it...Open the cylinder, push the ejector rod all the way in, with a toothbrush clean under the star that lifts the hulls out of the cylinder real good. Sometimes a little trash under the star btween the cylinder and causes the cylinder to bind when you shut the gun up. As far as the circular piece you mention, I dont know that much about Redhawks to answer.
Best Regards, James
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Howdy James -

This Redhawk is about as spit-shined as she'll ever be!

I did not describe the "binding" as cleary as I should have.  The cylinder free spins without a hitch.  Once the cylinder is closed (it catches in the spot described above), the cylinder gap looks perfect for all six chambers and the cylinder shows no signs of binding - it's that little round piece that is causing the headaches.

I called a local gunsmith, told him what I did (his response, "oh man, whad'ya do that for?"!) and he feels, for about &#3640, he can get it back in shape no problem (he'll look at it tomorrow).  Am I better off doing this or sending the gun back to Ruger?  With shipping costs and FFL fees, it'll run me &#3670 (without repair cost).
 

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Alan, you do not have to pay FFL fees.  The law allows you to ship the gun directly to the factory, and the factory back to you without a FFL transfer.  (Unless you live in a communist state!)  It should only cost you &#3630 to ship.  I'd personally rather have Ruger look it over.  It will take several weeks though.  I would also bet you that they will fix it for nothing.  Bill Ruger takes care of his customers.  

Don't feel like the lone ranger pal, I did a bad one to my new Ruger too.  I drove a wood dowel through a stuck bullet during a bore lapping project, right into the cylinder, locking it tighter than heck.  I took my chances and sheared off the dowel to open the cylinder.  It had more lapping rounds through it than real bullets, brand new.  Now it shoots 3 to 5 inch groups at 25 yards.  Our guns may cross in the Mail!!

Oh well, you may have a good gun for a lifetime, whats a coupla more weeks.....

Matt-
 
 

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Alan,

Send her back to Ruger. End of story. They'll make it right and it won't cost a dime except shipping. Although you may want to leave out the cause of the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
FYI -

My brand new, unfired and meticulously cleaned  :biggrin:  Redhawk has been shipped over night to the good folks at Sturm, Ruger & Co.  Back to the waiting game.

Now, when this bugger comes back from Ruger, I still need to finish slugging the other cylinders to get the complete picture.  How do I accomplish this without any harm or foul to the crane assembly?  For the life of me, I can't see/figure out how the cylinder can be removed from the crane assembly without special tools and/or experience??

(Edited by Alan at 4:21 pm on April 3, 2001)
 
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