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I'm new and just feeling my way around this site. I plan to slug the barrels to several revolvers I have. I know it's probably best to drive the slug from the forcing cone to the muzzel. Anyone have any tips on how to drive the slug down to the muzzel?
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Dennis, nearly any sort of rod will do.  Wooden dowel rods are OK, brass is really good, even a smooth steel rod will work OK if you don't let it bang against the rifling.

Best way is to pad the jaws of a vise, secure the gun in the vise, spritz a little WD-40 or similar down the barrel, and go from there.  Use the heaviest hammer you can find and tap gently.  A 4 lb. hammer works pretty good.  Light hammers don't work worth beans.

I think you'll find that it is really pretty easy.  Let us know how it goes.
 

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It's Christmas and I could not pass this by.
When I slug a barrel I like a right upper cut.
Jim
 

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Dennis,

Mike has excellent suggestions for tools of the trade in slugging a barrel, but make sure you drive the slug from the muzzle first then out through the forcing cone!  It makes the job MUCH more practical. :smile:

Too, as you shove the slug through the barrel from the muzzle, you will find the constriction we all talk about, where your barrel shank is screwed into the frame... usually .0015"-.003" in most Ruger revolvers over .357 caliber.  When you find this, you'll immediately see the need for lapping the barrel of your six-shooter.

God Bless,

Marshall
 

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thinking about getting into loading.  how about suggestions for equipment.  want to start loading for the 444.   speaking of lapping a barrel.....do you lap from the muzzle???   don't have marsall's book yet.   where on the beartooth site can I find 444 bullets?   I don't see them listed.  How about used loading equipment?  where to look for used equipment?   any help appreciated.    really enjoying this forum site.  harpo
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Lotsa good questions and I think that you'll get some good advice here.

Equipment - if you're just starting out I think that it makes good sense to buy a complete "kit" from one of the major manufacturers.  That way you get a good complete set of stuff, plus a good loading manual.

I have a lot of different brands of stuff and like it all but if you want me to go out on a limb I'd recommend the RCBS or Hornady kit for the beginner.  Usually the starter kit comes with your choice of dies, of course you'd need .444 dies (and a shellholder).

Lapping.... do it with bullets loaded with lapping compound.  You fire them at reduced velocities, so it's from the breech to the muzzle.  DON'T worry about this yet - I highly recommend you start reloading with jacketed first, to get the hang of it.  You can use any .429-.430" jacketed pistol bullets.  Some of them would even be good game bullets in your rifle, generally those heavier than 240 grains (265 Hornady, 270 Speer, 300 Speer/Sierra/Nosler?, etc.).

When you get ready to do some cast bullets, check back in and report how it's going.  Use .44 bullets, they are common between the .44 Mag and .444 rifle.

Used equipment - probably not a good idea for the beginner.  The only used 'equipment' I would recommend would be different reloading manuals, and you should start looking for one or two that are different from the one that comes with your reloading kit.  Can't have too much reference information.  Can sometimes find used books for sale at gunshops and gun shows.

OK now the rest of you chime in....
 

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Cochran,

Look at the Midway USA brand single stage reloading press and their powder measure. I have found them to be of very high quality and a very good value.

I purchased mine in their "Ultimate reloaders Kit". I do not know if they still sell it that way.

I like the Hornady Reloading books. It comes as a 2 book set one book has all the reloading info and the second has all the charts and graphs. I personally find them useful. I would also check out the powder companys websites. Often times they have reloading manuals pertaining to their powders, that you can download or mail away for.

If you really want to find decent used stuff, try to get involved in a local shooting organization. I have found that the guys who shoot alot will often have "extras" and are willing to help out a new reloader, both in equipment and advice.

Hope this helps,

Ray C.
 

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I really appreciate the input ...keep it coming!   Start with jacketed bullets first....why is that?   Are they easier to load, more "forgiving or what???   Why does one use a cast bullet over a jacketed one or visa versa?   Hope you guys can put up with a greenhorn lioke me.   jws
 
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