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Hey guys, I am new to guns and recently got a pump action twelve gauge. I read that it's a good idea to clean it prior to shooting it for the first time. While cleaning it I accidentally spilled a generous amount of Hoppe's 9 onto the gun and it got all over the receiver, trigger area, and stock. I wiped it off as best as I could but it still smells really strong. Did I damage my new gun or gum up the action by doing this? Will the smell ever go away? Thanks a lot, John.
 

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Welcome John Smith. No, you didn't hurt anything. Hoppe's #9 has a lot of smell but won't hurt anything. Just wipe as much up as you can. Even if you hadn't spilled any, it smells strong for quite a while from just using it. My wife hates it when I clean a gun with it without the windows open in the house. I actually find the smell quite pleasant in moderate quantities. As long as it's wiped off reasonably well it won't hurt anything. By todays standards, it's quite a mild cleaner.
 

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Welcome to the shooters forum.

The only thing I'd be concerned about is the solvent damaging the grips. If they are removable take them off and dry underneath.
 

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welcome John.

dunking in Hoppe's will not harm any steel or other metals. BUT if a wooden stock on the shotgun, I'd pull it of and wipe it down and let air dry before putting it back on.
 

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I got a little sloppy at the range once with a new rifle that had a camo synthetic stock. Hoppes 9 got on the camo stock and it took a little of the finish off when I wiped it off. It is now a little shiny on the stock where it laid for a few minutes. So... while the solvent won't hurt metal, it doesn't do your synthetic stock any good. Just sayin'.
 

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There are a handful of cleaners on the market that match or best Hoppes #9, without the smell / toxicity.

I won't let Hoppes #9 inside my house or garage. I feel sorry for wives, kids and pets that have to smell/breathe that stuff.
 

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welcome John.

dunking in Hoppe's will not harm any steel or other metals. BUT if a wooden stock on the shotgun, I'd pull it of and wipe it down and let air dry before putting it back on.
The exception being not to soak anything nickel plated in Hoppe's #9. It states so right on the bottle as it will attack nickel.
 

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Hoppe's #9 and Rangoon Oil are the only true colognes for a shooter. I LOVE the stuff!!
 

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Check out the Hoppe's Elite line of cleaners and lubes, I know the gun oil is very low odor and not offensive.
Smell everything before you buy it. A buddy who owned a gun shop sold me this large bottle of Clenzoil , he touted it as the best stuff since sliced bread, good for everything metal, leather, wood.....and it may be but the truth is it has an odor I just don't like. It reeks...I've tried to get used to it but just can't. Any gun cleaned with the stuff can't be brought into the house for a month...it's just a sick smell. I'll never buy anything like that again unless I smell it.
Now the old #9 formula, I've learned to love because I got some with my first gun when I was twelve. And for decades it was the only cleaner used. But my wife hasn't learned to like it and if I want to sleep with her the guns in the bedroom have to not smell bad.
It will dissipate in time and it definitely is a smell you have to acquire a liking for.
Gary
 

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Hey guys, I am new to guns and recently got a pump action twelve gauge. I read that it's a good idea to clean it prior to shooting it for the first time. While cleaning it I accidentally spilled a generous amount of Hoppe's 9 onto the gun and it got all over the receiver, trigger area, and stock. I wiped it off as best as I could but it still smells really strong. Did I damage my new gun or gum up the action by doing this? Will the smell ever go away? Thanks a lot, John.

Depending on the shotgun and how it's made, if you cleared off the Hoppes right after the spill, shouldn't hurt it including the stock or pistol grip depending on what it is.

BUT... if it got into the shotgun, you probably would be wise to take it down and clean it. Lube as needed when finished.
 

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gwpercel--- Somebody steered you way wrong. Clenzoil is one part linseed oil and nine part turpentine. It's used to seal rust blue and is wonderful at that job but has no cleaning ability at all. It is a 'hard' oil to gun and forms a very tough 'in the metal' seal with rust blue which is semi-porous on a micro scale.
 

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gwpercel--- Somebody steered you way wrong. Clenzoil is one part linseed oil and nine part turpentine. It's used to seal rust blue and is wonderful at that job but has no cleaning ability at all. It is a 'hard' oil to gun and forms a very tough 'in the metal' seal with rust blue which is semi-porous on a micro scale.
Hoppes has kerosene in it, not turpentine. Same way Ed's Red does, depending on how you buy or mix it.
 

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Just about every 'solvent' on the market will have kerosene, naptha or Stoddards in it.
The best solvent I've ever tried, and still use, is US Military "Cleaning Compound Solvent". You can sometimes find it surplus. The last I bought was a gallon can dated 1965 for $8. Its got almost no smell and is 'thick' like dry cleaning solvent, but it removes powder fouling like pure magic. It has a very low evap rate so there's always a bread pan with a quarter inch in the bottom with a couple brushes sitting on the bench. A cloth damp with CCS takes the Bullseye smut off a SS revolver so fast you wonder how it can work so good but its hard to start on fire!
 

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I keep a bottle of Hoppes #9 on my cologne shelf and a couple of pints of Butches in my cleaning room!

Allen
 

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Just about every 'solvent' on the market will have kerosene, naptha or Stoddards in it.
The best solvent I've ever tried, and still use, is US Military "Cleaning Compound Solvent". You can sometimes find it surplus. The last I bought was a gallon can dated 1965 for $8. Its got almost no smell and is 'thick' like dry cleaning solvent, but it removes powder fouling like pure magic. It has a very low evap rate so there's always a bread pan with a quarter inch in the bottom with a couple brushes sitting on the bench. A cloth damp with CCS takes the Bullseye smut off a SS revolver so fast you wonder how it can work so good but its hard to start on fire!
You can mix up Ed's Red without kerosene, Turpentine, naptha or Stoddards in it and it still works nicely. I keep a can of it in the shop without any of the mentioned ones so I don't have to worry about ventilation. Cleared several pistols that had been put away uncleaned and sat for varying amounts of time by soaking in in Ed's Red.

Works nicely, just have to mix it up. I can post the formula and the USMC uses it all the time.
 

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My favorite gun bore cleaner is hot soapy water, but its just too much trouble these days, so I use whatevers handy. I like Wipe OUt to remove copper and about any other commercial gun stuff for cleaning smudge and crud...Mostly once again I like a boresnake with a little shot of something on the wire brush part.
 
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