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Discussion Starter #1
Am having a great deal of fun ringing this little guy out. Mine is a stainless 22 Hornet..410 and I am impressed with it. The 22 Hornet is capable of 2-3MOA groups at 100 yards which is as good as I can do with open sights. I think with a scope this thing might be amazing but I won't scope it. I bought it thinking that I could use 45 grain Barnes X bullets for small game and if need be could rip a caribou through the lungs too. If a bear bothered me the X bullet through the brain pan would be discouraging. I was thrilled to get 1.2 inch 50 yard groups from the X bullet and thought my plan had come together. Unfortunately in testing the bullets in paper media the X bullets are not quite stabalized and tumble in the media, badly limiting penetration. In a sears catalogue penetration test today the X's came in last behind 40 Sierra/Berger and 45 grain Hornady bullets! Well the X's did edge out the 410 slug at 1706 ft/sec which fragmented on the catalogue.

Thinking about buying some 35 grain copper bullets from South Africa which are designed for the Hornet but they are pretty pricey. Seems like the 1-13" twist is good for bullets up to about .715" for accuracy and about .65" on test media. The 50 grain Sierra semipointed at .642 is a good candidate and at 2300ft/sec shouldn't be too explosive. If I was in charge of the company .I would make these with a 1-10" twist and extend the depth of the butt ammo storage to allow 2" rounds. I drilled out the last two 22 Hornet holes to allow for longer cartridges to be stored but as is it maxes out at about 1.8". Using this cartridge in a 1-10 twist with 60 Nosler partitions at 2100ft/sec would be great for small game and emergency bigger game use. This isn't a varmint rig and yet it is only set up to shoot varmint bullets. Maybe cast is the way to go? A blunt nosed 55 -60 grain might just stabalize in 1-13. At least it isn't a 1-16. I just sold an old BRNO that started to lose it with 45 grain Hornady Bullets.

At first I thought the shotgun was god awful but I am a rifle man and was testing it all wrong. Brought out some big paper with a 20" circle and tested at 20 yards. Turns out I have to play with the steps on the front sight to kentucky windage the shot shells on to target. Both 3" #6 and 4 gave usable patterns with 57 of 93 # 4's (61%) in the 20" circle, and 84 of 155 (54%) #6's in the circle. The Win slugs 1/5 oz went into 3 shot groups of 1.4" at 10 yards, 3.5" at 20 yards and 5.3" as 25 yards. A homemade buckshot load of 5 00 bucks go into 1 hole at 5 yards, a 4" vertical string at 10 yards and a remarkable 23" vertical string at 25 yards though 4 were in the 20" circle. The opening is 380 at the end and it is advertised as full choke. I wonder if a little less choke would allow better slug and buckshot accuracy and deform bird shot less making for patterns nearly as good as full.

Thinking about buying some 140 grain Liberty 410 slugs and experimenting. Not sure what these fast stepping frangible 88 grain Win slugs are designed for ? Also I wonder if 2.5" shot shells will pattern better and if 7.5 shot is the way to go.

The new attachement through bolt is hand removable and allows for easy breakdown into an amazingly compact peice. I wish the **** trigger guard was easy to remove as it is too small for mitts and interferes with folding. I almost had it pried out but lost confidence and gave up.

Still..at 4 pounds and 18" taken down this is my new canoe and skidoo take along. fascinating little rig with a lot of potential. I think the stainless 22 Hornet is the best choice for flexibility but seeing how rare they seem to be and how hard to get I am in a minority.
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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One of the blued SA models resides in the gun vault in the .22 Hornet/.410 arrangement. A scope mount was obtained from SA and a cheapo Simmons variable put on it. 100 yd accuracy of the Hornet using 45 gr factory (Win & Rem) improved from 3.5" iron sight groups to about 2.5" groups. Using some 35 gr Hornady V-Max handloads with 13.0 gr of Hodgdon Li'l Gun and a std primer gave slightly better results.

I've had the same thoughts of boring out the full choke on the shotgun to increase the capability of slug accuracy. An Improved Cylinder choke might be the best compromise between slugs and shot.

Intrestingly, I too, bored out the shell holder chambers of the stock to improve the OAL of the handloads.

This firearm wasn't purchased as a survival gun, as I'm not really in any need of one. Its just a handy little utility rifle to toss into the truck when going to the country and popping coyotes and jackrabbits as the opportunity arises.
 

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I too share an affinity for those little M6 combo guns. Great little grouse, snowshoe guns with cabability for as you say, coyotes and other larger vermin. You're right about perhaps going to a lead bullet for the heavier projectiles you want. My experience with them has been that the 60g SPGC sized .225" do wonders in the .22 Hornet barrel. Push them hard with H110, Lil'Gun or AA1680 and they do well out of the 1:13" twist. The lead bullet is significantly shorter than it's jacketed counterparts of comparable weight, and stabilization is thus enhanced.

I like 2.5" #7.5's for just about everything in the .410 bore. Yes, you can get more payload, 1/8 oz. in the 3" hull, but for practical ranges that you'll use the gun, the 2.5's seem to give much better patterns in my guns. Even collected a couple odd pheasants with that load.

I too am intrigued by the stailess offering of these versatile little guns, seems it would be a great plane/truck gun to just tuck away and forget about until such time as you need it. Oh, by the way, take that confounded excuse of a trigger guard off, as you started to do, and the gun folds completely back on itself and makes a very nice compact package! Makes using that trigger much easier as well.

God Bless,

Marshall
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Kdub and Marshall.

Marshall do you have any hints for taking out the trigger guard. I started thinking it was a simple pin arrangement but soon found it was a stepped pin that needs to be removed by prying out the sides. Am I correct? Is there a good technique for prying I was using a screw driver and didn't like the force I was needing to use to spring the sides.

the guard does seem like a monstrosity interfering with a pretty slick design. The only powders I can find in these neck of the woods is 4227, I have been trying for Hodgdon Lil Gun for years, every time (rarely) I am in Yellowknife or Edmonton and haven't found any. I'll keep looking.
 

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I'll have to take a look at mine, and remember exactly how I removed the trigger guard.... it's been quite a while and I'll have to og my memory to be specific enough to be of any help to you.

This weekend is my wife's and mine anniversary, so it'll be probably Monday or Tuesday before I'll have a chance to dig that out of the gunsafe and remember exactly what it took to remove the trigger guard.

I'll get back to you then!

God Bless,

Marshall
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Weather has turned colder and grouse season is in full swing. Know the M-6 pretty well
The barely stable 45 X bullets are now spraying all over the paper in cold weather! Can't get em fast enough with 4227 and the 13" twist.

factory bullets pulverize game and I have gone to 50 grain Sierra Semispitzers at 2100ft/sec. Accurate enough for Grouse head shots to 40 yards if I have a rest, body shots to 100 and at this range still a bit explosive but o.k. #6 shot works to 20 yards maybe 25.

The Sierra bullet doesn't fragment too badly beyond 40 yards and might do in a pinch for a lung shot caribou.

The 60 grain bullet from Bear Tooth seems a bit long.... a 55 grain would be better. In hard cast it would do a nice job at 2000ft/sec on game.

I thgink the 410 could do a lot better but will need to reload to get the benefit.

To take the trigger guard off requires a drill to drill out at least one side of the front stepped pin. You can then easily take off the guard. Much handier but need to be a bit more careful .
 
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