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Discussion Starter #1
I religiously used small pistol primers when reloading for my win 94 for both 38 special and 357 mag loads.
Has anyone tried small rifle primers for rifle use only in the above calibers?
Is there anything to suggest that it's a no-no?
 

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Pistol calibers, call for pistol primers,... at least that is the way I go about it.

Never tried what you suggest, so I can't comment on that, sorry.
 

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I've not tried that in .38 or .357, but I have a .256 Maximum (which is the .357 Maximum case necked down to .256) I have used both small pistol and small rifle for it. Started both at starting loads and worked up. See no reason why you couldn't. I'd just start at a beginning load and work up very slowly. Use a Chrono if you have one available
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for that BH355, just what I needed. I've just about run out of small pistol primers but have nearly 3000 sr primers for my 223 so it makes sense to use what's available to me.
 

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Have done it, doubt you’d have trouble.



Times are tough on reloaders…..if you have more rifle primers and keep those loads to rifle use (separate from revolver use), might conserve the pistol primers.


Would not want to swap to rifle primers on a load worked up to the ragged edge of safety with pistol primers. Not so much for the small amount of pressure increase just the primer could cause, but some powders are kind of picky about over ignition/the grain shattering effect of primers.


Certainly have enough striker “oomph” to ignite the thicker cups constantly.


The primer does ‘set back’ first...to whatever the limit of headspace..before the powder actually ignites and sets the case back. Not unusual to find a bit of a depression around the firing pin in old rifles or much used revolvers (seems was common with Win. ‘95’s in 30-06 and many old well used revolvers).


Stronger primer would accelerate that , but most current firearms are made of tougher stuff.
 

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I know this is talking about use in a 9mm but the test results speak for them self. In a pinch I'd do it starting with a reduced load.

 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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I'd use them if I had to. Your rifle is plenty strong.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
7mmRLC, great vid, thanks for sharing.
FWIW I was just looking back thru an old edition of lymans manual and for 357 rifle only loads they recommend small pistol magnum, looking at that vid it seems like that's a healthy dose of snake oil.
 

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I shoot many of what is thought to be pistol cartridges in rifles and some rifle cartridges in long barreled pistols, so the question, is it a rifle or is it a pistol often enters into the equation. I have used both types of primers in them all and the key is always the same. Start with the lightest powder charge possible and work up slowly. After working up, I don't think that I've been able to notice a bit of difference by just changing out the primer. Though back in my silhouette shooting days, components were plentiful and once I found the load that worked the best................. That load NEVER changed one bit.
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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But the video was on the internet so it must be true.

🤔🙄

RJ
 

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Havatit.... I made the mistake of mixing 250 large rifle primers in a batch of 45 acp once and they wouldn't function in my 1911 .. they stuck out to far ..
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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Because LR primers are "longer/deeper" than LP primers.

Small rifle and small pistol are the same length/depth.

RJ
 

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I'll just abstain from posting anything from the internet even if it is true. Seems like trying to be helpful can sometimes lead to counter productive. I'll just leave it to the experts.
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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There's even rumors that SR and SP primers are the same, just different boxes, but I'm not sold on that.

I have used SR 's in loads for my KGP161 as a lark and all six went bang.

RJ
 
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Discussion Starter #17
7MM I wasn't having a go at the vid, I was having a go at the lymans 49th.
 

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I got it. My other reply wasn't aimed at you.
7MM I wasn't having a go at the vid, I was having a go at the lymans 49th.
It was more for those who practice contempt prior to investigation.
 

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Years ago, when CCI still belonged to itself, I called to ask the difference between their magnum small pistol primers and their standard small rifle primers. The nice lady on the phone replied that they were identical and that CCI's own employees bought only the SR primers for both purposes because they were priced slightly lower. She even took the time to double-check on her computer to confirm they used the same cups and anvils and had the same quantity of priming composition in them. Today, if you call the multi-company switchboard and they shift you over to CCI, you get a tech who says interchanging them is "playing with Dynamite" and never to do it. And no, that person doesn't stop to look them up on his computer to see if the parts are the same. He had a company line to recite, possibly for some perceived liability issue and probably so the higher-priced magnum pistol primers continue to sell at their higher price.

Anyway, have they really changed these primers since I spoke to the nice lady? I suspect, that what the nice lady told me fifteen or twenty years ago is still true for CCI, based on the video results. Just don't assume the same will be true for Federal or Winchester or any other brand than CCI. In those cases, you are advised to start with the lowest starting load you can find in your manuals if you change from pistol to the rifle version of their primers, and work up slowly. Since you are using the same case, bullet, and powder, a chronograph should pretty accurately tell you if the changed primer is changing your pressure because then the velocity will be higher for a given load than it was with the milder primer.
 
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