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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of my "over winter" things to do involves the restoration of some of the Stevens boy's rifles that I'll pick up at gun shows , when the price is below reasonable. Most all of these rifles have rotted away rifling from the use of Lesmok powder in the .22 rimfire ammunition back it the day and then neglect of bore cleaning.

BEFORE:



AFTER:



Both sides of the receiver were surface ground so they became flat, which only required removal of around 0.0080 to 0.0090 thousandths of metal on each side and then hand polished using a hardwood block and #220 grit emery paper, progressing to #600.

BEFORE:



AFTER:



Barrel flats were also progressively cleaned up starting with #220 to #600 wet-or-dry paper backed by the wood block. The front sight blade was gingerly flattened back to where it became straight once again.

The barrel was drilled out and a 1:16 liner was installed and then chambered for .22 LR. All the metal was rust blued and the boogered up screw slots were TIG welded and then the slots re-cut.

The butt stock was missing, so another was fit and finished, but the original forearm was still used.

 

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Nicely done!

Liked the part about TIG welding the screws and recutting the slots. Did you go to the trouble of aligning the slots?
 

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That's a mighty fine job. Congratulations!

A surface grinder sure makes things easy! I ground a a Gd-1 Superposed yesterday in prep for engraving. Its hard to believe how 'out of flat' even the best of factory guns are.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Wow...that is really wonderful. Way to save a little piece of history.

Great job.
Thanks. The clientele for resurrection jobs like these are normally grandads who want one of these neat little rifles restored for a grandson.
When you consider what these rifles cost back in the day, many times the cost involved out weighs the nostalgia. When I do put finished rifles on my tables at gunshows, I really do enjoy the conversations involved with folks that had one of these when they were boys and how they took pigeons off corn cribs, or even put down a hog for family bacon. Working on these keeps me focused during some of the long winters up here. Can't figure out why "global warming" forgot about us in these parts. :D
 

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Great job! I have one hanging on the wall that has been redone. It was my grandfather’s and I was told back in the day he saved up the $7.50 it cost! Im proud to have that one in my possession. It shoots great still and besides refinishing all its had done is the ejector needed bushed to take out the slop.

Mind me asking what it would cost to have someone like yourself reline the barrel and refinish one like you did there? Im always looking for them and have passed on some since I didnt have anyone handy to do the work on it.
 

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great job!!!!!!!!

i liked the 25 and the 32 stevens rimfire. its a shame that they have to shoot very collectible ammo.
 

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Please be cautious with Stevens Favorites and Crack Shots. The rim can catch between the front of the extractor and the barrel and fire when the lever is closed. The fan of hot brass coming out the top has been known to blind both eyes.
We were advised in Gunsmith school to not work on them due to that liability.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Great job! I have one hanging on the wall that has been redone. It was my grandfather’s and I was told back in the day he saved up the $7.50 it cost! Im proud to have that one in my possession. It shoots great still and besides refinishing all its had done is the ejector needed bushed to take out the slop.

Mind me asking what it would cost to have someone like yourself reline the barrel and refinish one like you did there? Im always looking for them and have passed on some since I didnt have anyone handy to do the work on it.
I've experienced what you describe.

Here's an extractor I replaced in a Stevens Model 44, the bigger brother to the 1915 Favorite:




If the allegation that "things were done much better in the old days" were completely true, it only makes me even more appreciative of my time spent as an apprentice toolmaker. If any of the old toolmakers, who were refugees fleeing Europe when Hitler was being a major problem, would see the sort of work as done above, I sure wouldn't have wanted to have been involved with that abomination. :eek:

I prefer to do bluing using the "rust blue" process, and pretty much all of my polishing preparation is done by hand. That all takes a bunch of time as involved, depending on the condition of the metal before beginning.
Drilling out a rotted barrel is also a time consuming task to prepare it for the installation of a replacement liner. Then the muzzle needs to be crowned and the breech end chambered.

Walk-in gun repair work keeps me busy most of the year and when winter rolls around, I have enough of these old rifles waiting for attention, so I'm reluctant to commit time to another project.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Interesting! Those instructors never mentioned the need to wear "eye and ear protection" when shooting?
 

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Well, my Experience in 1960-1965 Navy was that I was REFUSED ear or hearing protection as a Loader because "I might not hear the Gun Captain's Orders', which resulted in 'Service Connected" hearing damage in both ears.

It seems many may have the same problems.

Chev. William
 

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The Favorite was made about 60 years before safety glasses were invented. Well made guns won't blind you. The Favorite has a defect that has been well known for a hundred years. I simply asked if you fixed it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The Favorite was made about 60 years before safety glasses were invented. Well made guns won't blind you. The Favorite has a defect that has been well known for a hundred years. I simply asked if you fixed it.
Didn't realise you were talking about shooting these rifles sixty years ago. I mistakenly thought your instructor was referring to shooting these "faulty" rifles, as is, in a more modern era, like when you were in his class and when safety glasses and ear protection were certainly available.
In many instances the original extractor does need to have the working end built up by "TIG" welding and then recutting along with when the chamber is cut. Common sense should dictate the situation, if anyone doing the work is work their salt.
 

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Please be cautious with Stevens Favorites and Crack Shots. The rim can catch between the front of the extractor and the barrel and fire when the lever is closed.
That was the reason for having the linkage reworked and bushed. The extractor drops when the action is opened and when loading you can mistakenly load the round too far and as you stated , be forward of the extractor , and it can fire when closing the action.

Once my action was corrected , you have to purposely try to recreate that situation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
That was the reason for having the linkage reworked and bushed. The extractor drops when the action is opened and when loading you can mistakenly load the round too far and as you stated , be forward of the extractor , and it can fire when closing the action.

Once my action was corrected , you have to purposely try to recreate that situation.
Once again, I'm kinda late for rehearsal, but that's the idea involved with a "restoration" as I see it. Back in the day when many of these old Stevens rifles were manufactured and "hand-fit assembled" the hourly wage was in the neighborhood of $0.50 per hour using machines that ran from an over-head belt, or line shaft, set-up. Looking at the original hand-fit extractor on the left and then a modern machined replacement on the right, we can see why the gentleman above needed to have his extractor pivot pin hole "bushed", because no doubt the dang thing wobbled quite a bit and could most likely easily find its way underneath a case rim:



With restoration care and a knowledgeable, "hard fitting" of parts procedure, and patience, using a good file with a steady hand, the newly fit extractor will fling spent cases over whichever shoulder the shooter uses.
Projects like these are normally not grand "money makers", unless the owner just can't be talked out of what's involved with the restoration process. In many cases a calendar is used much more often that a clock.
 

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Please be cautious with Stevens Favorites and Crack Shots. The rim can catch between the front of the extractor and the barrel and fire when the lever is closed. The fan of hot brass coming out the top has been known to blind both eyes.
We were advised in Gunsmith school to not work on them due to that liability.
I see "Extractor" is used in place of "Ejector" or was the term used interchangeably back in its day?
The Ejector Model from my experience is; 1 open action(spent case or cartridge it tossed from action). 2. Close action fully to reset the Extractor,
open action far enough to load.
Video Extractor Model:
Video Ejector Model:

Now i am only asking because of the two distinct actions and the terminology begged the question.
 

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IF there is an extra spring, sear and trigger, it is an ejector that throws fired cases clear. An extractor lifts the cartridge out of the chamber.
Some single shots can be operated fast enough to throw a case clear but that's not a true ejector.
Both have the same problem of too much space exposed that can catch the rim on closing.
That's a Favorite not a Crackshot, BTW. The Crackshot was riveted together and less expensive.
If there's a strong spring behind the extractor, its most like an ejector. Pure extractors lift by cam action.
 

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With restoration care and a knowledgeable, "hard fitting" of parts procedure, and patience, using a good file with a steady hand, the newly fit extractor will fling spent cases over whichever shoulder the shooter uses.
Projects like ............
Thanks for the response Jack.
I should have included this quote in my other post along with yours because this quote is describing an extractor IMO.
 
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