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To fling a case over any shoulder will take a spring. Flicking the finger lever can't be enough.
A great illustration of extractor-ejector is the Ruger Number One. One part can be both by simply taking out the spring component by backing off on the tension screw. Without the 'snap' of the over-center spring, it's an extractor and no matter how hard you operate the lever, it stays an extractor. Add in the spring and it flings cases (into the front of the safety) free of the chamber.
 

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Incorrect gun parts can be just a difference of opinion. The trend in the last 20 years is to arbitrarily re-name a common part to something else.
My very first day of work in my brand new job, an old guy came in with a wired together Hopkins and Allen single barrel and said 'De splunge don't reject'.
"The what?"
The nail he used as a firing pin (splunge) didn't have a return spring so it stuck in the primer and locked the gun up. The splunge don't reject. Of course it don't.
Dummy me!
 

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Incorrect gun parts can be just a difference of opinion. The trend in the last 20 years is to arbitrarily re-name a common part to something else.
My very first day of work in my brand new job, an old guy came in with a wired together Hopkins and Allen single barrel and said 'De splunge don't reject'.
"The what?"
The nail he used as a firing pin (splunge) didn't have a return spring so it stuck in the primer and locked the gun up. The splunge don't reject. Of course it don't.
Dummy me!
I have one of those old H-A's and it's firing pin is broken.
It was given to me by a Gun Smith for use in Firearms Safety classes for warning about loading the old timers with Modern ammunition.
The old barrel has stress cracks up and down it that will cut skin just by picking it up by the barrel. I knocked the firing pin off to De-Mil it.
I loaded a primed case and dropped the hammer several times and the primer wasn't touched.
In a pinch, i will remember the 8 penny "splunge" Lol
 

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AH-- That's the weld line. The barrels were made by folding 'pipe'. That's the seam. It could be silver solder (more than likely) gas welded or forge welded.
Never count on a gun to fail when you're trying to teach safety. I had a nasty old Crown double with twist steel barrels and pits that nearly went all the way through. I was going to demonstrate to a bunch of Scouts the danger of shooting modern ammo in twist/laminated/Damascus barrels. To be SURE of something memorable, I packed the bore with wet newspapers ahead of a 20 ga shell and then a 3 inch 12 ga. buckshot. The gun was hidden by sandbags and a string pulled the trigger. Newpapers flew 50 yards! The barrel was bulged but did not fail!
 

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AH-- That's the weld line. The barrels were made by folding 'pipe'. That's the seam. It could be silver solder (more than likely) gas welded or forge welded.
Never count on a gun to fail when you're trying to teach safety. I had a nasty old Crown double with twist steel barrels and pits that nearly went all the way through. I was going to demonstrate to a bunch of Scouts the danger of shooting modern ammo in twist/laminated/Damascus barrels. To be SURE of something memorable, I packed the bore with wet newspapers ahead of a 20 ga shell and then a 3 inch 12 ga. buckshot. The gun was hidden by sandbags and a string pulled the trigger. Newpapers flew 50 yards! The barrel was bulged but did not fail!
Weld Line, well that is the longest line and not the sharpest, i do believe their are stress cracks on the barrel but i will digress, as i certainly don't have any prior knowledge of old shotgun barrels.
I also have another old Jack-handle or as some would say, a tomato stake
H&R single with the top of the chamber blown away and was told by the owner that it was loaded with a 3" shell and when it blew it also De-Mil'ed itself by shearing off the firing pin.
The old Ranger{Catalog Brand) SXS .410 that was my Dad's only firearm was abused by me and 7 brothers when we would load it with 3" shells and have to close it over the knee cramming the shell into the chamber. There were no shell length marking and even with the full crimp 2 1/2" shell hulls would stick in the chambers making it hard to break open,
 

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If you have some good magnification, scratch that line with a scribe. I'll bet its brass.
 

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Nice...does count as a restoration rather than a rebuild.

Only a few restorations….several “rebuilds”..and only one Favorite. Like the Favorite, but in my location kept coming up with good H&A candidates. Tipping block vs falling block doesn’t make much difference in a .22RF.

Like to work with hand tools...might even be better when time doesn’t matter and are looking for a winter project. Draw filing/flat polishing goes so much easier with octagon barrels and slab-sided receivers.

Guess the object was to make them as solid as they were at birth...eventually they get out in the world for another couple of generations of use.
 

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Inexpensive guns of that period were made from low carbon steel we would associate with carriage bolts. If you make all replacement parts from O-1 tool steel, you have the option of heat-treating but the steel in the annealed state is MUCH stronger and long lasting than low carbon stock. Drill rod or StresPruf for round parts and O-1 for flats and all the bases are covered.
If you have the ability to forge parts, start with Grade 5 bolts (surplus @$.50/lb). They forge well, finish well and wear well.
 
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