Shooters Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am replacing the missing bullseye on the stock of my 1981, 336, 30-30. I was thinking that I may refinish the factory walnut stock at the same time. My question is: would you use TruOil stain to inhance the color or TruOil stock finish alone?

Thanks in advance
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,685 Posts
Welcome to the forum. Rules are to join in, be polite, and play nicely with the rest of us kids.

I'll move your question to gunsmithing for you.

I have used a staining oil with birch stocks to make them resemble walnut, but walnut, to my eye, looks good on its own and needs only the oil finish. TruOil has a good reputation. I have also used Watco Danish Oil successfully. At the advice of a friend who is a cabinet maker, I make three applications using 320, 400, and 600 grit wet/dry sandpaper as the applicators for each coat, respectively.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
669 Posts
It just so happens that I am in the process of refinishing my old 30-30 stock. It was scratched up a bit years go. I replaced the wood stock with a youth model plastic stock for my son. He did not shoot it because he fell in love with my 25-06.

My plans was to lightly sand and then go back over with Tru Oil only. I have had good experiences in the past with just using true oil by itself.

Darin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,251 Posts
I've been using Johnson's Min-Wax stains for the last several years with excellent results.

When I premix a bit of their Black Walnut with an equal amount of their Red Mahogany, a pleasing (IMO) dark reddish-brown color comes to life under a few coats of Tru-Oil rubbed-in with a fingertip until it "squeaks", then left to dry overnite between coats before buffing with a clean/new pad of OOOO steel wool. & a topping of stock paste wax.

.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,209 Posts
I prefer a lighter-colored stock than most people, perhaps, so I didn't use any stain on either of the guns I refinished last year...I just applied several coats of boiled linseed oil. NOTE: This does not provide nearly as much protection as Tru-Oil or other products and must be reapplied every year or two, to maintain the finish.

http://picasaweb.google.com/jason.broom/22Restore#
 

·
The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
Joined
·
23,956 Posts
Presently finishing up a stock that had the MinWax walnut stain applied, then progressive coats of Minwax exterior clear high gloss spar urathane. Each coat gets hand rubbed, then worked down with the 340, 400 and 600 grit paper with fine and extra fine steel wool to slick it up prior to the next coat. Just finished the 9th coat of probably 12.

One trick you really need to consider for the best finish - always use a tack cloth to remove all fuzz, lint or left over powdered finish before applying the next coat. Tack cloths are available wherever paints and finishers are sold.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,835 Posts
Another vote for Tru-Oil

I use it on most stock refinishing projects. Boiled linseed oil is what I prefer on military and muzzleloader stocks. Just a final note, I never sand a finished stock. All the best...
Gil
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,889 Posts
I too am a fan of a clear finish over real walnut stock, allowing all the grain and coloration to show through. Of the 10 or so stocks I've refinished I've never applied stain to any piece of walnut. If you do choose to go with a clear finish I'd highly suggest a verathane or poly finish (satin). This finish is much tougher than any other type and with no stain underneath, future applications (if ever necessary) are as easy as a light sand and re-coat away.

I have stocks finished in this manner 20 yrs ago that still look excellent (without additional coats). To check for the color you'd get without any stain, final sand the stock to necessary smoothness and wipe with a wet cloth (or one soaked with paint thinner or turpentine) and this will show you what color you'll see with a clear finish.

You can use wipe on, spray on, or even brush on poly and not have to worry at all about over sanding between coats (you won't damage the color or finish by slighty too much sanding). By using a satin finish, rather than gloss or high gloss, you'll have a low luster finish. Gouges or bad scrapes in the finish can be repaired by wiping on some additional finish, or even using a cu-tip or small artists brush for touch up.

Two or three coats of finish, sanded in between, will give you a very durable and weatherproof finish. Remember to finish all areas of inletting as well for a really weatherproof finish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
706 Posts
I am replacing the missing bullseye on the stock of my 1981, 336, 30-30. I was thinking that I may refinish the factory walnut stock at the same time. My question is: would you use TruOil stain to inhance the color or TruOil stock finish alone?

Thanks in advance

If it is walnut , I would not stain it at all . If I used TruOil , it would be the stuff w/o any stain .

If you want it shiny , try urethane ?

Do you live in a wet climate ? Dry ? How much protection does it need ?

Have you ever tried Boiled Linseed Oil ? With turpentine & bees wax ?

Tung oil ?

God bless
Wyr
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
354 Posts
I'm refinishing a walnut stock now using Formby's Tung Oil finish. It's more of a varnish type than pure tung oil, but so far it's looking great. I opted for the low gloss version. I'll be putting the third coat on propably tomorrow as it's taking around three days to properly dry between coats, but I'm in no hurry at all. I want it done right. As others suggested no stain is needed for walnut as it looks great on it's own. I'm sure the Tru-oil would be great as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,209 Posts
I'm refinishing a walnut stock now using Formby's Tung Oil finish. It's more of a varnish type than pure tung oil, but so far it's looking great. I opted for the low gloss version. I'll be putting the third coat on propably tomorrow as it's taking around three days to properly dry between coats, but I'm in no hurry at all. I want it done right. As others suggested no stain is needed for walnut as it looks great on it's own. I'm sure the Tru-oil would be great as well.
Pictures, man...PICTURES! :D
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top