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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Henry Golden Boy .22 lever action that someone had drilled and tapped for a scope. I don't want the scope but can't seem to remove the screws on the scope base. I asked the previous owner about it and he said the gunsmith he had do the work "glassed the scope base onto the gun. Does that mean he put fiber glass in the screw holes? If so how do I get the screws out without damaging the gun?
 

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It likely means he reinforced the screw-mounting by gluing the base to the receiver with something like AcraGlas. Heat will be needed to release it. A judiciously-applied propane torch should do it .
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, I'll try that...I thought about heating the screws with a sodering iron but that would probably take quite a while!
 

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Make sure you use a bit that fits the screw as tightly as possible. Secure the gun in a cradle or gun vise and try it. By using a proper bit you can get better torque on the screw and less chance of spinning off the screw and damaging any other parts. If that doesn't work, try some Kroil or WD-40. I would be careful to try and not get it on the brass. I don't know if it will do anything but best not to take a chance. Hopefully when you get it off they didn't grind into the brass. If all else fails I guess try as little amount of heat as possible to get them off. If you get the screws loose or out, you may need to carefully tap on the base with a wooden dowel or brass rod and be careful not to nick or scratch the receiver.

Good luck.
 

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Actually the soldering iron trick is the best way to get Loc-Tite to release. That's what was probably used to lock the threads. I have fits in the shop because people use the red kind on scope screws instead of the blue kind which will turn loose. Above all, use a screwdriver that is parallel ground and FITS the screw slot. If you don't you will more than likely twist out the slot in the screw and life has only begun to get interesting then. Here endeth the lesson. Goatwhiskers the Elder
 

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Folks, if that sucker is AcrasGlassed on there, it is going to take heat -- period. WD40 and so forth won't affect it at all. And it will be more than just the screws -- the entire underside of the mount will be glued in place.

Actually, this is a good idea when you're dealing with a brass receiver that screws might pull out of -- sort of reinforces everything, turns it all in to a single unit. But it is a bugger to remove. By all means, go slow and easy with the heat. Using a tight-fitting screwdriver, try the screws all along the way until they begin to turn. Once they are out, if the base is still stuck in place give it heat, and at each stage of the heating give it a light but sharp rap with a hammer handle or wooden mallet. Eventually it will reach the temp where the AcraGals will release. Know this -- very likely a thin layer of AcrasGlass will still adhere to the top of the receiver. Even with heat, you will likely have to use a very soft scraper -- I use flattened copper tubing -- to scrape it off. If heat scares you after getting the screws out, try putting the whole thing in a freezer for a few hours, take it out, and give the mount a rap or three. Sometimes the uneven shrinkage of the metal surfaces will break the bond. But heat is about the only way the screws are going to give.

I have a good deal of experience at dealing with this situation. Gluing the base on place can be a very good technique -- IF you never want to take it off again. Otherwise, it is a major, time-consuming, but not impossible, job.
 

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Pisgah, you're right on all counts. I will say (can't remember exactly) that the release temp of Acraglass is much less than any temp that will have any effect on the metal, but one must still be careful. I once repaired a stock and the acraglass oozed out of the crack and got into the checkering. Stuff is kinda hard to cut out of the lines, but got inspired and waved my propane torch at the stuff and the instant it liquified hit it with a brass wire brush. Perfectly clean, and sealed too! Goat
 

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I'd like to know whether a heat gun would work too, I'd rather work and extra 5 min with a heat gun than go too long with a propane torch
 

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You will see AcraGlas bubbling and smoking out of every crack long before the heat will be enough to harm the metal. A heat gun might work, but the advantage to a propane torch is that you can direct the tip of the flame much more precisely and put the heat right to where it needs to go.
 

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Yes a hot air gun will work provided its produces a hot enough temperature. Used my Milwaukee heat gun to remove some Stud and Bearing Mount LockTite'd base screws in a T/C Contender barrel. Believe the Milwaukee reaches over 1200 degrees F on the highest temperature setting. When I bought it years ago its selling point was you could solder with it which is handy not having a flame in some enviroments.
 

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I know a good heatgun will work on the "blue" stuff if you have enough gun. Trouble happens when the piece you are working can "sink" the heat away faster than you can provide it.
Big alluminum pieces are good at that.

Sometimes a combination of heat and cold can "break" the bond.

A "hot" or "cold" penetrant applyed to the opposite sometimes works. Try to freeze the metal and apply warm oil.

Cheezywan
 
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