Shooters Forum banner
1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Soooo.... I got my first stuck case. I was decapping and resizing a bunch of 223. I saw one that I saw might need another run through as I wasn't happy with the shoulder. ( I should have just tossed it to recycle), So after inspection I put it back in the press, ( I had already wiped it off). BOOM!!!!!
STUCK.
I looked at the case remover kit, and I have a complete tap and die set.
looks like I just need an oversized nut and an allen bolt that will match the Tap.
Or am I delirious and just the rcbs kit?
:D
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,233 Posts
All you need is a #7 drill and 1/4-20 tap and cap screw and a couple washers. Its easy to screw the die into the press from BELOW. Leave a gap between the stuck case and the top of the threads. Lay the washers on top and run the cap screw through and when its tightened, the case will pop out.

Don't forget to back off on the de-capping pin so the drill doesn't hit it. :eek:
 

·
The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
Joined
·
37,698 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,135 Posts
Lucky

The last one I had stuck tore in half inside the die.:eek:
Old 44 brass Norma head stamp and harder than woodpecker lips.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,233 Posts
With broken cases in a die or rifle chamber, simply pour a sulfur cast and the part come out with the cast.

At one time, I had about thirty ruined dies. One with a screwdriver driven in from the top but the blade was wider than the hole...bigger hammer!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,255 Posts
Makers should just l sell new dies with a case pre-stuck in them. Get that lesson learned right out of the box.
I guess the reloading god has had his hand on me, I've never stuck one. But early on during my learning curve many moons ago I had a piece of .270 win. chatter really bad on the way into the die, so rather than stop in mid stroke I ran it all the way home. I didn't dare try to back the ram down until thinking about how I might avoid the obvious, as I was pretty certain I was staring at a stuck case. After several minutes of thinking about things, I removed the die from the press, then heated it up a tad, not enough to damage the temper, but enough that it was too hot to hold for more than a few seconds. I then gave the die an oil bath while it was still hot, I think I used Kroil. I threaded it back into the press, slid the shell holder on and went for it. It gave me a little bit of chatter at the very start, but as soon as it had moved a discernible distance the oil must have done it's job, cause it slid out slicker than snot at that point.

In my defense though, I was pretty much brand new to reloading bottle and was trying to come up the with a way to avoid having to lube every single piece of brass, there ain't no short cuts to lubing brass. That was all it took for me to learn my lesson and have never had another close call since. I have experienced my share of lube dents after that experience.

SMOA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,347 Posts
But early on during my learning curve many moons ago I had a piece of .270 win. chatter really bad on the way into the die, so rather than stop in mid stroke I ran it all the way home.
I find that feeding a batch of cases into a sizing die has a unique feel for each operation. Especially the process that has me squeezing down 50-250 cases at a stretch. (I'm still using a single stage press).
It's not unusual for me to miss a lube step, and I've learned that if it feels even a tiny bit different, I stop and back out.
Sometimes the pad needs a dose of lube. Sometimes that case is an outlier, and just needs some extra force, after I give it another pass at the pad. Pushing harder until I know what the problem is is asking for a round of annoying stuck case removal.

Then again, I have two sets of dies for all of my "in house" rounds, in case I get caught NOT paying attention. Poo happens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,648 Posts
Imperial...not good but great!

I had a few stuck cases and then discovered "IMPERIAL" sizing wax.

Randy
Right, this is the best stuff since sliced bread! The old Imperial would last forever. Recently finished up a large can purchased in the early 1980's The Imperial stuff works great also but, does not last as long. Way less likely to dent shoulders. No more sticky STP like stuff.

I have stuck a couple of cases since buying that first can. Strictly operator error. My lawyer friend called me at 9:00 PM recently with a stuck case. Talked him through the trauma. Spoke to him again and was the happy owner of two cans on Imperial. Wonder what would have happened if I had called him at that hour for legal advise?:)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,233 Posts
As a gunsmith, stuck cases usually come after ruination. Some folks just don't THINK right!!

About three years ago, a had a friend that I was teaching to reload and a batch of nickled, FC .222 brass was to be loaded. He stuck a case within ten minutes. I showed him enough about the lathe and phase converters and secret combinations so he could pull the next one. It was THE NEXT one! THAT is when I found out that Hornaday One Shot hardens in the can so the wax that is actually the active ingrediant was petrified in a lump stuck in the bottom of the can. No amount of shaking made it work. Imperial solved the problem, of course.

When you hear a squeak going in the die, go buy a case remover.

Submoa---All that work did nothing. You still haven't had a sho-nuff stuck case, because heating, oil, witchcraft and wishing will NOT pull one that's stuck. Brass jammed in steel is an oil SEAL. There is no penetration.

There is an alternate method that works but is a LOT of work--- Cut the head off the case so the expander and rod can be removed, pour a sulfur cast in the case and then knock it out just as it cools.

BTW, using the threads in the press as a die holder and spacer means you don't have to have a vise or pliers to hold anything. Drill, tap, washer and bolt is the complete kit.
 

·
Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
Joined
·
11,665 Posts
As much as I hate to admit it . . . . . . I find RCBS's water soluble case lube to be as effective as Imperial for day to day use, but for reforming or wildcat work there's no substitute for Imperial.

RJ
 
  • Like
Reactions: TMan

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,418 Posts
Whatever FN uses As a Polymer Coating on their FNB 5.7x28mm Brass Does Work as Case Lube in my Reforming that .314" diameter Brass down to .276" Diameter Body and Head.
By going multiple Steps the Coating lasts all the way to the Last Swaging step.
By the way, I am using Lee Precision Carbide Ring sizing dies "Opened" by Lee to the various step size diameterss I use.
Chev. William
 

·
The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
Joined
·
37,698 Posts
If you can get the case and die really cold, that may help with removal. Brass expands/shrinks faster than steel. Heating it up, would only make the brass swell up worse and be harder to remove.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
I have stuck several cases over the years(35). I've however learned the feel of a stuck case as I'm going in the die w/the case. As soon as I feel the least resistance...I back out and re-lube. Imperial will save a man's bacon regularly. I don't trust or use the spray lubes. powdr
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
897 Posts
I own a stuck case kit, but in forty years reloading, have never used it. Probably because I just stop at the first sign of trouble and investigate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,403 Posts
I think that Hornady should include a stuck case remover with their "One Shot" lube!, after switching over to ISDW it sits in the goody box at the back of the bench gathering dust.
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top