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Discussion Starter #1
Rainy, boring, couple of days here. Is there anything you would use, besides the 'send away for' stuff, as a substitute for bedding a rifle? Thinking JB Weld or something readily available. By the time a mail order arrives it will be nice enough to want to be outside shooting that gun. Just asking, Mike
 

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The two part epoxies they sell at home depot work as good as the specialized stuff except it's usually runnier, let it set up a little before applying and you won't know the difference, I've used the Lok-tite before and it was fine.
Gorilla glue makes one as well but I dislike their regular glue so have not tried the 2-part from them.
 

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You can add 'flock' or expanded silica to any runny epoxy to make a paste. Micro-beads also work but the epoxy is 'softer'. (MicroBed).
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the returns. I just dug up an old thread from Grumpy.22 2017 that gives me some good info. I'm kinda lazy on research. Forgive me. But what and how with the micro-beads......?
 

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You can mix mico-beads into any epoxy to make 'bondo' filler. They're used in body work because they sand well. Chopped glass fibers leave a fuzz.
the Fused silica 'flock' is also used as a filler/fiber reinforcement. You can also use stainless steel grit or powder. Don't use powdered alumimum just due to the fire hazard of mixing it, but it can be used.

I had a student that trolled a magnet through the surface grinder table and mixed it in with his epoxy. It worked fine but it could be a rusted mess 45 years later..
 
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You can mix mico-beads into any epoxy to make 'bondo' filler. They're used in body work because they sand well. Chopped glass fibers leave a fuzz.
the Fused silica 'flock' is also used as a filler/fiber reinforcement. You can also use stainless steel grit or powder. Don't use powdered alumimum just due to the fire hazard of mixing it, but it can be used.

I had a student that trolled a magnet through the surface grinder table and mixed it in with his epoxy. It worked fine but it could be a rusted mess 45 years later..
What does mixing powdered Aluminum with epoxy have to do with being a fire hazard, I have never heard of that before?
 

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Powdered aluminum (and magnesium)are the 'fuels' in flash (fireworks) powder. It is extremely explosive as airborne dust and always ground wet and handled as a paste.
 

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There are very few things that aren't explosive, when in aerosol powder form.
Just don't work with them over candle light...
Some things aren't worth laying awake at night over.

Cheers
 
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