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well i went back to cabelas today and the fn was gone ( or could not find it cuz i was looking like crazy) but i found another fn like cambered in 30-06 i was oh man i was about to get it but the atm limit is 300 a day :mad: but i was talking to a guy that worked there and he said to look at this website its called backpage.com and its sorta like a craigs list for guns but its local i been looking and i found a browning a bolt for 400 dollars and a i also found this gun http://phoenix.backpage.com/SportsEquipForSale/400-springfield-03-sporter-30-06/11482983
but what do you guys think im not to sure on how much a a bolt cost bit is it to good to be true ?
 

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Well mr-ponce, you just learned a couple gun buying lessons here. First one, if you see something you like thats in good shape in the used rack, you better buy it- especially around hunting season. Next lesson, there will always be another gun that gets you wanting again.

The problem with you asking about prices being in line for these rifles or not is that we cant see them and you're not giving a lot of specifics on condition. The Browning A-bolt is an excellent rifle and depending on its condition $400 is probably a fair price. That said, if its beat **** it might not be worth much of anything, hard to say with no pics and no condition ratings. Kinda like saying I found an F-150 for $2500, is it worth it? Hard to give an answer based on that alone.

I looked at that Springfield sporter. Its a decent rifle but not at $400 (to me anyway). Theres truckloads of sportarized Springfields, Krags, Mausers, etc... floating around out there so its nothing special.
 

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The question I would have about the 1903 is in the details. Is it an 03A3? Is it one of the early 1903's, with the milder steel that wasn't heat-treated? Who made this particular gun? Does it have the original trigger or has that been improved? If it's a Smith-Corona, 03A3, and you can't find anything wrong with it, $400 is still a good price for it, but nowhere near as much of a "sure thing" as the FN you described.

The lessons to be learned from all of this are: When you're in the market for a quality used gun, shop around, cruising the used gun places in your area, but know what you really want, beforehand. Also, it pays to know where your local bank branches are, in case you find another gun like that FN...and trust me, YOU WILL! :D
 

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For a novice gun buyer I would suggest bringing someone experienced with you to look at the Springfield, there are some worn out butchered sporterized 1903's out there. Personally $400.00 seems too high for that gun, but it comes down to what its worth to you.
 

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Hard to improve on the last two posters' advice!!;)
 

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For a novice gun buyer I would suggest bringing someone experienced with you to look at the Springfield but it comes down to what its worth to you.
+1

I recently bought a Browning A-Bolt via gunbroker.com for $425 and it's practically brand new. It was never fired and had been sitting in a gunsafe. The rifle is 20 yrs old but its age didn't matter to me because it looked nice. the bore is clean, the wood finish is immaculate and it feels pretty substantial in my hands. my only complaint is that the hinged floorplate rattles slightly when locked into position and the bolt doesn't seem as stable as it should when pulled back, but then again, this is my first rifle and I know nothing about how these things should be.

so yeah, I would say price is a subjective topic when buying a used gun and it's ultimately what you're willing to pay. $400 does seem like a lot judging from the pics you showed us. try gunbroker.com, you might have better luck
 

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+1

I recently bought a Browning A-Bolt via gunbroker.com for $425 and it's practically brand new. It was never fired and had been sitting in a gunsafe. The rifle is 20 yrs old but its age didn't matter to me because it looked nice. the bore is clean, the wood finish is immaculate and it feels pretty substantial in my hands. my only complaint is that the hinged floorplate rattles slightly when locked into position and the bolt doesn't seem as stable as it should when pulled back, but then again, this is my first rifle and I know nothing about how these things should be.

so yeah, I would say price is a subjective topic when buying a used gun and it's ultimately what you're willing to pay. $400 does seem like a lot judging from the pics you showed us. try gunbroker.com, you might have better luck
Congrats on your new rifle! I'd not be the least bit concerned about the little "issues" with your A-Bolt. The fact that the bolt is not rock solid when pulled rearward is really of no concern IMHO. The M98 action, one of the best (the best?) bolt action designs ever invented has a good bit of "play" when the bolt is fully to the rear and still has it's ardent fans. I'd bet that floorplate (magazine attached?) will not rattle whatsoever when rounds are loaded in it. I'll bet it shoots as well as it looks too!:D
 

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Congrats on your new rifle! I'd not be the least bit concerned about the little "issues" with your A-Bolt. The fact that the bolt is not rock solid when pulled rearward is really of no concern IMHO. The M98 action, one of the best (the best?) bolt action designs ever invented has a good bit of "play" when the bolt is fully to the rear and still has it's ardent fans. I'd bet that floorplate (magazine attached?) will not rattle whatsoever when rounds are loaded in it. I'll bet it shoots as well as it looks too!:D
thanks! I should be getting my Leupold scope in the mail today which is exciting. now all I need to buy are some mounts and scope rings and I should be set. this is becoming expensive :eek:
 

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The question I would have about the 1903 is in the details. Is it an 03A3? Is it one of the early 1903's, with the milder steel that wasn't heat-treated?
I'm unaware of any '03's that were not heat treated. The early ones were given a single heat treatment that proved to be brittle... the "low number" rifles. The later "high number" rifles were double heat treated to provide a hard surface around a milder core. That improved the overall strength of the receivers.
 

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I'm unaware of any '03's that were not heat treated. The early ones were given a single heat treatment that proved to be brittle... the "low number" rifles. The later "high number" rifles were double heat treated to provide a hard surface around a milder core. That improved the overall strength of the receivers.
OK, fine "that weren't heat-treated properly".
 

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I'm unaware of any '03's that were not heat treated. The early ones were given a single heat treatment that proved to be brittle... the "low number" rifles. The later "high number" rifles were double heat treated to provide a hard surface around a milder core. That improved the overall strength of the receivers.
well stated.anyone in the metal foundry trade knows that all metal poured undergoes heat treatment--.45 carbon steel(non alloy) 10-45 ,10-30 and st-10-30 commonly used years ago.7 stage temp ramp downs were not used then but pressure in fire arms was probably a lot lower. a 45 tonne core at around 185 brinell at a guess may have been quite adequate.must stick a piece in the spectrograph if the opportunity ever arises and get a read out.
 

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well stated.anyone in the metal foundry trade knows that all metal poured undergoes heat treatment--.45 carbon steel(non alloy) 10-45 ,10-30 and st-10-30 commonly used years ago.7 stage temp ramp downs were not used then but pressure in fire arms was probably a lot lower. a 45 tonne core at around 185 brinell at a guess may have been quite adequate.must stick a piece in the spectrograph if the opportunity ever arises and get a read out.
For anyone interested in the heat treatment of 1903 rifles, an excellent reference is chapter IX of "Hatcher's Notebook". General Hatcher goes into the history of the heat treatments given to the receivers, the steel compositions and interesting experiments conducted to test the strength of the receivers. In one instance a low number single heat treatment receiver burst when a German 8mm cartridge was fired in the rifle. It's pointed out that the same experiment in a double heat treated "high number" receiver caused no damage. Even a 45 grain charge of Bullseye powder behind a 170 grain proof bullet that reached about 75,000 PSI didn't cause the double heat treated receiver to give way.

"Hatcher's Notebook" is an excellent reference on a wide range of military firearms and well worth having on your bookshelf.
 

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It depends what you prefer

mr-ponce,
A sporterized Springfield brings what the buyer is willing to pay. I bought an excellent low number sporterized Springfield for $125.00. The 1903A3 sporters I bought recently varied from $175.00 to $250.00. So it depends. All the best...
Gil
 
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