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Two weeks ago I got a Bel & Carlson Medalist Tactical/Varmint stock for my Remington 700 SPS-V in .223. Yesterday the afternoon temperature on the range was 78 after a rain so I took advantage of the break is our horribly hot weather and shot the rifle for the first time after the stock change.

Of 39 previously recorded 3-shot groups at 104 yards, 10 of them were sub-.500" and the smallest was .310". They were all shot with the factory stock in place.

Yesterday, I shot three consecutive 3-shot groups of .356", .334" and .284". I have no doubt that the B&C stock gets a large share of the credit for the consistency.

My load, for anyone interested, is 25.5 grains of H-4895 in an LC-08 or 09 case and a 63 grain Sierra semi-point bullet seated to an OAL of 2.250". A standard primer is used.

I'm very pleased with the B&C stock and have plans to replace the stock on my .308 SPS-V rifle when I can afford it.
 

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I have a Sako Varmint 223 that shoots (or has) consistent sub 1 MOA including some loads that are consistent 1/2" or less. Once you get used to accurate rifles there is no turning back!

Anyway, I had it put away for a number of years, took it out to re-zero and the gun shot so high that the only solution was to shim the scope mounts and even with that, I couldn't crank the scope any lower than about 3" high at 100 yards.

Now it is at the gunsmith getting pillar bedded and the bbl free floated. We'll see how it shoots and perhaps put a adjustable dampener under the last 1" of the forearm.

I made a note of your loads. I've had decent results with Winchester 748 and 55 grn Noslers.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have a Sako Varmint 223 that shoots (or has) consistent sub 1 MOA including some loads that are consistent 1/2" or less. Once you get used to accurate rifles there is no turning back!

Anyway, I had it put away for a number of years, took it out to re-zero and the gun shot so high that the only solution was to shim the scope mounts and even with that, I couldn't crank the scope any lower than about 3" high at 100 yards.
I'm guessing that the stock has warped over the years and is putting a lot of upward pressure on the barrel. Hopefully your gunsmith can get the problem corrected as the SAKO rifles have an excellent reputation for consistent accuracy.

My problem with the factory stock was a tendency to move the POI right as the barrel heated. I suspect that the pressure point in the tip of the factory stock was placing more pressure on the left side of the barrel than on the right. The pressure point is actually two separate contact points bearing on the barrel at about 170 and 190 degrees. Any discrepancy in pressure between the two as the barrel heats up would show as a shift in POI. That's my theory anyway. The B&C stock free floats the barrel and the POI remains much more constant.
 

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I'm guessing that the stock has warped over the years and is putting a lot of upward pressure on the barrel. Hopefully your gunsmith can get the problem corrected as the SAKO rifles have an excellent reputation for consistent accuracy.

My problem with the factory stock was a tendency to move the POI right as the barrel heated. I suspect that the pressure point in the tip of the factory stock was placing more pressure on the left side of the barrel than on the right. The pressure point is actually two separate contact points bearing on the barrel at about 170 and 190 degrees. Any discrepancy in pressure between the two as the barrel heats up would show as a shift in POI. That's my theory anyway. The B&C stock free floats the barrel and the POI remains much more constant.
I had a Model 70 Featherweight in 25-'06 that was set up exactly as you describe. The dowel rod from a toilet paper dispenser and coarse-then-fine sandpaper alleviated that mess, resulting in groups cut down from 3" to 1.5", at 100 yards.
 

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and not only the forearm either guys....with the action in the stock and tightened down, slide a dollar bill underneath the bbl, down the bbl channel....if it won't slide easily all the way to the recoil lug, sand it out til it does, then seal it with varathane. home made floated bbl, no problemmo.

and when you set the action back into the wood, tighten the front screw first, good and snug, THEN finish tighten the rear screw. this "rocks" the recoil lug back into the wood, and is more accurate.
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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I've had great luck with the B&C thumbhole stock with the full aluminum bedding block for a customized Ruger M77 tang safety model with a Douglas premium SS barrel chambered in 7mm Dakota. Put the stock on with minor inletting adjustments and it shoots to point-of-aim at 300 yds, just as it did when installed almost 10 years ago.
 
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