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Discussion Starter #1
First of all, let me say that this is an excellent rifle. Besides being well made, it will feed anything one can get into the clip, including OWC and Xtreme Metplat designs. Many others will not.
There are no constrictions in the barrel except a little at the muzzle and if anything that aids in accuracy. The trigger isn't great, but with a little stoning makes a good field trigger.
Now for problem areas....Out of the box, this rifle would group with any bolt gun for about 10 or 15 shots. Then the groups would start to scatter with a couple cutting each other out then shift, still clustering ang shifting. At first I thought a scope trashed (as a Weaver did yesterday). After trying different scopes and loads I realized it was the rifle. Pulling it down I notice bright spots on the small raised hump in the barrel channel in the extreme front. This pad is supposed to dampen barrel whip (but that is where the problem occurs. The distance between the screws that pull the action down is very long. The recoil lug is behind the clip well. Too much pressure on the screws will flex the action causing too much pressure on the pad in the front of the stock. By removing that pad, floating the barrel, and the addition of a little glass under the front screw stops the problem dead. A small amount of wood should also be remove from the top where the recoil lug is. Do not remove any wood where the back of the recoil lug bears on the stock, only on top. This allows the action to bottom at the front and rear screw without bearing where the reciol lug is. This stops the flexing. All of this work, including sealing the wood, takes about one hour of your time. The results will prove out. Best Regards, James
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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I'll agree, both of my R77s had forend pressure from the factory, and floating the forends and glass bedding the receivers did them a lot of good. No more wandering zero!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Mike...I figued some of the fellows might have found the same problem. Here "Down South" small game hunting is also very popular as we have long seasons. The Ruger 10/22 is the single most used and there are tons of after-market barrels, etc. To make one really shoot...glass bed under the action screw a couple of inches either side so the screw can't flex the action, float the barrel, and watch even a regular one group!
Best Regards, James
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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James, very interesting, I had heard the opposite regarding 10/22s, that the receivers were light and flexible, so one should bed the barrel and float the receiver.

That's what I did, now I'm wondering what else could be done. You can't truely float the 10/22 barrels with the barrel band on the front, can you? Mine is a stainless, standard-weight barrel.

You thoughts are appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Mike, As with other firearms there are various approachs. If it is one of the very heavy bull barrels for a 10/22, I will go along with bedding the barrel and floating the action. However, with the standard barrels I still believe bedding under the takedown screw is best. An inch ahead of the screw and from the screw back to the reciever seems to work best. Yes, the rifles with a front band can be floated. Even without floating the barrel, the inside of the band should be ground out as not to touch the barrel. But again, there are different approachs, James
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Thanks for the suggestion, I will give it a try. Easy enough to mock up with thin strips of cardboard or business cards, etc.
 
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