Shooters Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
First.. disclaimer This worked for me.. don't assume it will do the same for you..

I too bought a T/C Compass in .223 a while back. I finally got around to addressing the hard trigger pull, mine was over 6 lbs. I did a lot of reading and looking at videos of folks messing with their triggers. Fixes ranged from cutting coils off the trigger spring, changing the spring to a lighter one, cutting the jam nut to a thinner diameter, and also taking one nut off and putting brass washers back on. Since mine was overly stiff I opted to simply remove one nut completely. Actually I reversed the nuts. One nut was ever so slightly larger than the other so that my 1/4 inch wrench wouldn't fit on. Rather than mess with it I swapped them.. For whatever reason the other nut fit my wrench perfectly. After checking the trigger pull a dozen times I took my wifes nail polish and put a dab on the top and bottom nuts to keep them from moving easily. I must have lucked out because I ended up with a 2 3/4 lb crisp pull with virtually no overtravel. I didn't adjust anything.. zero, just removed one nut and retained the green spring that everyone is changing. I target shoot so dropping it and having an accidental discharge is... well.... I can't see it happening since the rifle is unloaded until its sitting on the bench. I've dropped it a foot or two off the floor and nothing is happening but I'm not saying its safe for hunting applications or anything else for that matter. I put a new scope on and I'm not dropping it on purpose again unless I take the scope off first. Whether retaining the green spring unaltered is making the A/D not happen in my case is just a guess.

This was a half hour job only because I checked, rechecked, lubed and made sure I didn't screw it up. I spent more time finding the wrenches and something small enough to knock out the pin to drop the trigger assembly than I did doing the job. I ended up using an 1 1/2 in long paneling nail. The nail also serves to reinstall the pin. If I do it again it shouldn't be more than 10 minutes..

The result is a trigger that is beyond my expectations. I can't see that an expensive drop in trigger would be any better. That said, its possible the trigger will lighten up some more and an A/D may happen if you try it on purpose. If you don't hunt, well.. you make up your own mind. I'll be trying it whenever the weather in Ne Pa decides to stop raining..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
This is an old article, but I just did the work on my Compass also, and found the same problem and solution. My rifle measured 5.5 lbs stock, and it was adjusted all the way down from the factory. I took out one nut and it measured 2.5 lbs. I put a very thin washer back in and it increased the weight to 3.2 lbs. that is about perfect for me. Wallacem in Ga
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,352 Posts
I've never seen that trigger, but if like the two nuts on the trigger return spring of a M-70, one is for ajustment and the other is a jam nut to make sure the first one doesn't vibrate loose.
A lighter spring would do exactly the same thing and you could retain the safety nut.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top